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Broody or sick? - Page 3

post #21 of 26

I had one in a broody-buster for FIVE days this spring. Like you, early in that week, I kept thinking she was back to normal, but I think letting her out (and having her eventually end up back in the nesting box when I turned my back!!) prolonged the ordeal. As long as she has food, water, and something covering her from the elements, she'll be fine isolated from her buddies. I kept mine in a cage in the chicken yard where the hens could all see each other, but there was still some pecking order readjustment when she was finally freed. 

And we'll collect the moments one by one
I guess that's how the future's done 
~ Feist
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And we'll collect the moments one by one
I guess that's how the future's done 
~ Feist
Reply
post #22 of 26
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by applefalls View Post
 

I had one in a broody-buster for FIVE days this spring. Like you, early in that week, I kept thinking she was back to normal, but I think letting her out (and having her eventually end up back in the nesting box when I turned my back!!) prolonged the ordeal. As long as she has food, water, and something covering her from the elements, she'll be fine isolated from her buddies. I kept mine in a cage in the chicken yard where the hens could all see each other, but there was still some pecking order readjustment when she was finally freed. 


She is protected from the elements and predators and has food and water and I give her a few treats now and then.  I have her in the shed, which is about ten feet from the run, so if the chickens are in the run, everyone can see one another.  However, most days my girls free range, so she spends lots of time by herself.  If they're up at the coop/run area, they will visit her in the shed.  I feel badly for her, but I'm sure she's fine.  I can tell she's still broody because when I go anywhere near her she puffs up like a balloon.  So I'm resigned to leave her confined until she quits doing that and then I'll give her another chance to go free. 

post #23 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stephanie R View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by donrae View Post
 

Lots of birds flirt with being broody. They'll practice for several days, sometimes acting like the classic broody, sometimes they could not care less about those eggs. That's why I always wait and make sure they're dedicated before I set eggs under them. To me, dedicated is at least two nights in a row on the nest, plus all day. 

 

If you're wanting her to be broody, you can bait the nest and see if that helps. I mark eggs and place a decent sized clutch in the nest (usually 6 or so). You can use fake eggs, real eggs, whatever floats your boat. My personal feeling is having that clutch under them helps trigger the hormones. 

 

If you don't want a broody, continue to collect eggs frequently. Take the fake egg from the nest. You may need to resort to a broody buster if she's truly dedicated. 


I've resorted to a broody buster, but I have a question.  Should I not let her out of it at all for a couple of days?  My kennel is pretty big.  Big enough that she can stand up tall and walk around, but she is a wing flapper and it doesn't really allow that much room. 

 

I did let her out for a few minutes while I was sitting there and she seemed fine, although a bit flustered, but after about 10 minutes she headed straight for the nest box, so back in the kennel she went.

You can if you have time ...best to keep close eye so when she does go back to the nest you can crate her again asap.

I think it helps if they wander around even a bit before back to the nest.

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #24 of 26
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by aart View Post
 

You can if you have time ...best to keep close eye so when she does go back to the nest you can crate her again asap.

I think it helps if they wander around even a bit before back to the nest.


I don't go anywhere if I let her out.  I think what I've decided to do is about half an hour before I close up the coop, I'll let her out, but just inside the shed so she can stretch her legs and flap around for a while.  While she's in there I can freshen food and water, and clean the hardware cloth on the bottom of her kennel while I keep her company.  I'm enjoying the chicken balloon that she becomes when she puffs up.

post #25 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stephanie R View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by aart View Post
 

You can if you have time ...best to keep close eye so when she does go back to the nest you can crate her again asap.

I think it helps if they wander around even a bit before back to the nest.


I don't go anywhere if I let her out.  I think what I've decided to do is about half an hour before I close up the coop, I'll let her out, but just inside the shed so she can stretch her legs and flap around for a while.  While she's in there I can freshen food and water, and clean the hardware cloth on the bottom of her kennel while I keep her company.  I'm enjoying the chicken balloon that she becomes when she puffs up.

Even if she does get back into the nest for an hour or two, I don't think it would cause some great set-back in the process.

When I let mine have their walkabouts, I didn't always stay and watch them.

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #26 of 26
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by aart View Post
 

Even if she does get back into the nest for an hour or two, I don't think it would cause some great set-back in the process.

When I let mine have their walkabouts, I didn't always stay and watch them.


Well I thought we had this licked.  Last night when the other girls went to roost, I let her out and she ran right for the coop.  I thought, what the heck, let's see what happens.  And she got on the roost in her usual position and she was there this morning.  Yay?  Not so much.  She ran around the run for an hour and then she was right back in the nest box.  Little bugger.  So back to the broody buster it is.

 

Dang.

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