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post #11 of 18

Guineas need game bird starter.  They require a lot more protein then the chicks or ducks.  I think it's like 27 percent protein in their food. 

post #12 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by pattyhen View Post

Guineas need game bird starter.  They require a lot more protein then the chicks or ducks.  I think it's like 27 percent protein in their food. 

They do require a higher protein feed, but using a lower protein feed won't cause them to just drop dead at night, it mostly just retards their growth rate... Don't take that as being a suggestion to use lower protein feed and not expect other health issues beyond retarded growth, down the line, but the chances of it causing them to simply drop dead overnight is slim to nil...

I still would lean heavily on coccidiosis as the cause as the transition from the more controlled 'brooder' on the patio to the shed could have very well exposed them to a gut load of coccidiosis...

Sadly many people misuse medicated feed... In a clean brooder inside where the chicks/keets are not exposed to the outdoors or other birds, medicated feed has little benefit as the risk of exposure to high amounts of coccidiosis is low.. Medicated feeds true benefit is fully realized when the birds are introduced to an area where other domestic birds are or have been, or where other wild birds are or have been... Many people stop using medicated feed when they move the birds outside or introduce them to the flock, ironically this is when the medication is needed most in the new birds...

If you can't find medicated turkey or game bird starter, you can use medicated chick starter and add additional protein, or use the non-medicated turkey/game bird starter and treat the water with a preventative dose of Amprolium...
Edited by MeepBeep - 5/28/16 at 3:32pm
post #13 of 18
Thread Starter 

these were the first bids we've owned in years(we had a chicken but did not own the shed at that point) so there is no "other bird contamination".

how is this coccidiosis spread, so i can prevent it in my new keets?

 

also i read that a good way to sanitize the shed is a 10 part water to 1 part bleach mix is this true?

 

i found this online as the symtoms of coccidiosis in guineas. i marked the ones i noticed in my birds with  *.

 

Ruffled feathers.
*Unthriftiness.
Head drawn back into shoulders.(it is possible that this also happened but cant remember)
*A chilled appearance.
Thirsty.
Milky white diarrhea which may have blood in it.
*Die at night.

 

also my new ones are on chick starter (because we also got some chickens at the same time)not sure if medicated. i have to go out and look.


Edited by KidsandGuineas - 5/28/16 at 5:17pm
post #14 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by KidsandGuineas View Post

these were the first bids we've owned in years(we had a chicken but did not own the shed at that point) so there is no "other bird contamination".

I'm guessing it's a safe bet to assume you have some wild birds in your area that would be considered 'other bird contamination"? For example a little sparrow that visits another local chicken keeper and steps in a poop why stealing some chicken feed then lands in your yard, or a duck or goose flying overhead? The oocysts (kinda similar to eggs) are small and can even be transmitted by insects or carried in the air by the wind, and can survive for almost 2 years in that stage... It's best to assume it's everywhere unless you have a highly controlled and isolated sterile environment...
Quote:
how is this coccidiosis spread, so i can prevent it in my new keets?

It's spread via poop, but essentially you can assume it's everywhere, as wild birds have a tendency to just poop anywhere and don't obey property lines or fences, as said above the oocysts in the poop are small and easily carried and spread... In the end you don't prevent it you control it and allow you keets to build up an resistance so their body can keep it at bay naturally, this is what the medicated feed does, it allows the keets/chicks to get a mild dose of the cocci when exposed so that their body builds up an immunity... There is a lower risk if you keep your coop and run very clean, but you will never eliminate the risk as it's essentially everywhere in the environment... Consider it like any human germ, living in a clean environment, washing your hands regularly, bathing and what not all lower your risk of getting sick but they don't eliminate the risk as germs are everywhere...
Quote:
also i read that a good way to sanitize the shed is a 10 part water to 1 part bleach mix is this true?

Sure, but that isn't going to make it go away... If you have a contamination problem that would knock down the risk but not eliminate it...

If it is cocci the birds should be medicated with Amprolium so that their bodies have time to build up a natural immunity, then as long as you practice good husbandry in the coop and run the birds should be able to fend off cocci on their own...
Edited by MeepBeep - 5/28/16 at 6:15pm
post #15 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MeepBeep View Post


If it is cocci the birds should be medicated with Amprolium so that their bodies have time to build up a natural immunity, then as long as you practice good husbandry in the coop and run the birds should be able to fend off cocci on their own...

were can i find Amprolium? how much will i need per bird. how long will they need to take it

post #16 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by KidsandGuineas View Post
 

were can i find Amprolium? how much will i need per bird. how long will they need to take it


Also known by the name Corid and is available at places such as Tractor Supply or Amazon.

Welsummers, mixed breed chickens, Blue Slate turkeys, Sweetgrass turkeys and guineas.

In wonderful Wyoming.

Bob

 

My photo album

Reply

Welsummers, mixed breed chickens, Blue Slate turkeys, Sweetgrass turkeys and guineas.

In wonderful Wyoming.

Bob

 

My photo album

Reply
post #17 of 18
I generally order my Amprolium on Ebay because generics are cheaper, but I always have some on hand so I never need it fast, you would probably have better luck at a local farm store or feed store so you can get it ASAP...

As for dosage it depends on what you get, cross reference the concentration you get with this post...

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/818879/updated-corid-and-amprol-amprolium-dosing
Edited by MeepBeep - 5/28/16 at 10:18pm
post #18 of 18
Thread Starter 

thanks!!!:)

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