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Scissor Beak??

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 

Meet Greta! I got her a couple months ago from my dad who raised her from a chick. His flock had beat up on her pretty bad for some reason and wouldn't accept her back. We took her in and she pulled through and is now top hen here! She is about a year old, laying an egg a day, and is our only green egg layer. Today I noticed something that I hadn't before, which is odd because I'm with the chickens multiple times a day. But then I noticed that you can't see it when she has her beak shut or when she's facing straight towards you. But it looks like she might be developing scissor beak. 

 

When she turns her head a bit it's more noticeable. 

I've seen scissor beak in chicks but is it often that they start to develop in a hen her age? Or is it possible that when she was jumped on by her old flock something happened to her beak and if so will it continue to get worse? 

post #2 of 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by mahan4428 View Post
 

 

Meet Greta! I got her a couple months ago from my dad who raised her from a chick. His flock had beat up on her pretty bad for some reason and wouldn't accept her back. We took her in and she pulled through and is now top hen here! She is about a year old, laying an egg a day, and is our only green egg layer. Today I noticed something that I hadn't before, which is odd because I'm with the chickens multiple times a day. But then I noticed that you can't see it when she has her beak shut or when she's facing straight towards you. But it looks like she might be developing scissor beak. 

 

When she turns her head a bit it's more noticeable. 

 

I've seen scissor beak in chicks but is it often that they start to develop in a hen her age? Or is it possible that when she was jumped on by her old flock something happened to her beak and if so will it continue to get worse? 

This is scissor beak, but a mild case. I do not think it will worsen as such but will look worse as the beak grows longer. You will need to trim her beak as necessary. This is something she was hatched/born with.  Should be easy to care for.

post #3 of 6
Thread Starter 

We've only been raising chickens a little over a year. I'll have to do some research on how to care for her properly. Thank you! 

post #4 of 6

Some trimming may help, especially if it's getting worse.  She may have a harder time with eating, and need a deep dish of crumble, rather than pelleted feed, and be unable to feed off the ground.  Watch for feeding issues!  Definitely don't hatch any of her eggs.  Right now it looks very mild, hope it stays that way.  Mary

post #5 of 6
Thread Starter 
Thanks Mary. I will definitely be keeping a closer eye on her. Glad I don't necessarily need to cull her. I just love her green eggs!
post #6 of 6

I have a few scissor beaks.  Two are very mild, the entire beak just curves to one side a bit, they do fine without any help.  One was more severe, but trimming every other week has actually improved her considerably.  One is more severe, but still eats okay, although it pains me to look at her.

 

I feed fermented, and they do great scooping balls of it up and tossing it in.  You don't have to ferment, but wetting the crumbles makes quite a difference.  I trim as much as I feel I safely can without hitting the quick, and use human toenail clippers and a file to smooth it back into a point.


Edited by Mosey2003 - 5/26/16 at 5:42am
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