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Insulation Question

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 

Complete novice here planning on building our coop.

 

I live in SE PA, about 20 miles west of Philadelphia, to give you an idea on climate. I am planning on building the coop elevated, about 18"- 24" above ground and would like to know whether or not to insulate the floor?? While we are on the question of insulation, should I insulate the roof as well?? I know that I will have to provide adequate ventilation, and am planning on windows (cut-outs with hinged covers for now) on all four sides. Just thinking of keeping the cold from coming up through the floor in the winter, and keeping the heat from radiating down into the coop during the summer. Is this unnecessary?

 

Thanks for any and all help! So glad to have such a helpful forum at my fingertips!

post #2 of 8

I'll be curious to see the answers. I've got no insulation, but I live in Tennessee and my hens have never struggled through winter. I also have friends who live in St. Louis, where they get severe temps in all seasons, and they've got no insulation with no problems. That's not to say you won't need any.

post #3 of 8
Thread Starter 

thanks for the reply! wondering if insulation is not really necessary, but as i would like to build this coop only once lol, i figured the time for asking questions is now

post #4 of 8
I'm mid build and wondering as well. my primal instincts are saying its not necessarily needed but I just want to be sure.
post #5 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by evaluna View Post
 

Complete novice here planning on building our coop.

 

I live in SE PA, about 20 miles west of Philadelphia, to give you an idea on climate. I am planning on building the coop elevated, about 18"- 24" above ground and would like to know whether or not to insulate the floor?? While we are on the question of insulation, should I insulate the roof as well?? I know that I will have to provide adequate ventilation, and am planning on windows (cut-outs with hinged covers for now) on all four sides. Just thinking of keeping the cold from coming up through the floor in the winter, and keeping the heat from radiating down into the coop during the summer. Is this unnecessary?

 

Thanks for any and all help! So glad to have such a helpful forum at my fingertips!

 

actually only heat will transfer.. from high to low

 

the reason you are wearing a jacket during the winter is to keep your body heat from leaving your body .. not to keep the cold from coming in (unless there's wind)

 

insulation is used to slow down the transfer of heat.. not cold

 

i don't know how cold your area can get but if your chickens are fully grown with feathers.. body heat+ feathers+ group together will be sufficient for them to stay warm during the winter

 

just seal up any draft (holes/openings at the chicken level). 

 

if the temperature drops even lower.. and you think insulation is needed then  you can get add some insulation if you like.. on the outside (not inside) of the coop since chickens will peck at them.. so insulating all the surrounding walls (leaving ventilation) of the coop if you think it is needed.

 

if your area has longer winter months than summer.. then i would suggest you paint the outside of the coop with some dark (black) paint to help absorb the sun rays

 

there's a reason why white color cars are so popular here in Arizona heat :) .. since it will reflect more lights (thus cooler inside in the summer) vs black color cars

 

but black color cars would be the best if you in a state that has long winter months.


Edited by BruceAZ - 5/25/16 at 3:10pm
What i posted above are just my opinions.. they are NOT facts.
Reply
What i posted above are just my opinions.. they are NOT facts.
Reply
post #6 of 8

Birds have more problems with summer heat, so good ventilation and shade are important.  Insulating the roof helps both with summer sun and winter heat loss, and is worth it IMO.  My main coop also has insulation in the walls; not a bad idea, but much less important.  If you have very limited space, a raised coop might be a good idea, otherwise, a walk-in shed is much more practical!  Then a dirt floor is fine, with a dig-proof perimeter.  Mary

post #7 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by Folly's place View Post

Birds have more problems with summer heat, so good ventilation and shade are important.  Insulating the roof helps both with summer sun and winter heat loss, and is worth it IMO.  My main coop also has insulation in the walls; not a bad idea, but much less important.  If you have very limited space, a raised coop might be a good idea, otherwise, a walk-in shed is much more practical!  Then a dirt floor is fine, with a dig-proof perimeter.  Mary
i am mid build. 4x6 coop beneath trees and shade. 5 hens to start. Coop elevated only a foot off the ground. How many square feet of ventilation should i account for? I am putting 2 windows (18x10) and a door that will remain open all spring fall and summer. I also will have permanently open venting along the roof line. This is my issue. I dont know how many permanently open vents i should incorporate. And will this be detrimental to me in the winter and cause too many drafts? It can get down to -30 Celsius with the wind chill in the mid of winter.
post #8 of 8

aart has some good links to information about ventilation.  If your birds can get under the coop, you won't love getting under there too, so best to fence it off from them, and the varmits who will love the space.  Add a window in the door, and  openings on the south side of the coop.  You can cover some openings with plastic sheeting if needed in winter, but air flow is still important.  In a small coop, moisture will build up and that's a bad thing.  Mary

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