post #11 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by bailout00 View Post
 

This was the answer I was looking for, I'm not too concerned about them being fertilized, just wondered what exactly happens at that point, i.e. can they be safely stored for a while. Is it better to refrigerate them or no? 

 

I am all for having a rooster for the sake of protection, I am most likely going to free-range them in a month or two when I'm home so that will give me some sense of security. My only concern is the noise, I'm not supposed to have a "Crowing bird" in my muni, but I'm on 7 acres so we'll see.

 

Thanks for the info!

 

Also sorry for the double picture post, it wasn't showing up on my phone.

 

Like Donrae said, an egg has to be held at 100 degrees for 3 days for a chick to start developing. So if you don't collect eggs for a few days and a hen is broody, chicks might develop and you don't want to eat the eggs any more. If you gather your eggs every day or even every other day you shouldn't have problems with them. I think eggs can stay fresh outside of a refrigerator for a few days, but I'm not sure exactly how long. It is better to refrigerate them if you want them to stay good for a longer period of time. If you will be eating them soon, then don't worry about it. So, do what is best for you.

 

If you are on 7 acres and your neighbours aren't too close I doubt you will have problems. Glad I could help and hope all works out for you! :)

I am a CHRISTIAN

2 Corinthians 9:15

Thanks be unto God for His unspeakable gift.

 

1 rabbit, two dogs, three cats, 50+ (number goes up & down) free-range 'mutt' hens, roos, chicks, lots of fish (tilapia) and a Jersey cow and heifer calf! Have had quail in the past.

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I am a CHRISTIAN

2 Corinthians 9:15

Thanks be unto God for His unspeakable gift.

 

1 rabbit, two dogs, three cats, 50+ (number goes up & down) free-range 'mutt' hens, roos, chicks, lots of fish (tilapia) and a Jersey cow and heifer calf! Have had quail in the past.

Reply