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Sneezing Chicken

post #1 of 5
Thread Starter 
I recently bought a Rhode Island Red pullet for a petting farm. I bought her from a large container of other chickens at an animal auction. You can tell she was kept in a cramped space with other chickens because she is covered in poop. When I first brought her home, I noticed her purr sounded kind of gurgely. I later noticed liquid coming from her nostrils that she frequently wipes off on straw. She also does a sneeze/cough sound occasionally. She is still quarantined from the other chickens. She eats, drinks, and moves around fine. What's wrong with her? Can I treat it? Would other chickens be safe around her?
post #2 of 5
Quote:
Originally Posted by AzaleaOrpy View Post

I recently bought a Rhode Island Red pullet for a petting farm. I bought her from a large container of other chickens at an animal auction. You can tell she was kept in a cramped space with other chickens because she is covered in poop. When I first brought her home, I noticed her purr sounded kind of gurgely. I later noticed liquid coming from her nostrils that she frequently wipes off on straw. She also does a sneeze/cough sound occasionally. She is still quarantined from the other chickens. She eats, drinks, and moves around fine. What's wrong with her? Can I treat it? Would other chickens be safe around her?

the only thing I can think to suggest is a little bit of vetRx around the nostrils that seems to help all of mine that get any kind of respiratory issue 

post #3 of 5

Can you have her tested?

Mycoplasma Gallisepticum (MG) and Infectious Bronchitis (IB) are somewhat common as are several other respiratory illnesses. Depending on what it is, it can be contagious and affect you existing flock.

You did the right thing by keeping her separate. Practicing biosecurity between your flock and the quarantined bird will hopefully decrease spreading any contagions.  Some illnesses/symptoms can be treated successfully with antibiotics, but the infected bird will be a carrier for life.

After careful consideration and research hopefully you will be able to make a decision of whether or not it is worth the risk of introducing her to your flock.

 

http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ps044

http://www.thepoultrysite.com/diseaseinfo/94/mycoplasma-gallisepticum-infection-mg-chronic-respiratory-disease-chickens/

http://www.thepoultrysite.com/diseaseinfo/78/infectious-bronchitis-ib/

post #4 of 5
Thread Starter 

Thank you! I'll have to look into some antibiotics. She's looking a little better today, so hopefully she continues to improve. 

post #5 of 5
Quote:
Originally Posted by AzaleaOrpy View Post
 

Thank you! I'll have to look into some antibiotics. She's looking a little better today, so hopefully she continues to improve. 

I'm glad she seems to be doing better.

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