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Cull or keep?

post #1 of 5
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Healthy and strong chick, likely suffered trauma from other hens in the pen. Missing skin from side of face, scalp loosely connected, does have membrane to blink with. Beak does not occlude. Other eye does not appear to be functioning. Cull or keep?
post #2 of 5
Quote:
Originally Posted by azbecky View Post

Healthy and strong chick, likely suffered trauma from other hens in the pen. Missing skin from side of face, scalp loosely connected, does have membrane to blink with. Beak does not occlude. Other eye does not appear to be functioning. Cull or keep?

Sorry....Cull.

post #3 of 5

i would say keep cause he deserves a chance !!!

post #4 of 5


It depends.  If he is suffering or obviously having difficulty with living functions such as eating, drinking or moving fast enough to protect himself, then I would cull him.  Otherwise, see what happens and give him a chance.

 

I had a hen who was attacked by our dogs.  We managed to save her before they killed her, and she healed up just fine, although her thought processes seem a bit slow, even for a chicken.  She still lays eggs and hangs out with the flock, but she'll be the first one a predator gets when I free range them if she's not around the others or the rooster.  However, she deserves a chance, so she got one.

Peeps61
Location: NW Florida
Chickens since Feb. 2013
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Peeps61
Location: NW Florida
Chickens since Feb. 2013
Reply
post #5 of 5
Quote:
Originally Posted by azbecky View Post

Healthy and strong chick, likely suffered trauma from other hens in the pen. Missing skin from side of face, scalp loosely connected, does have membrane to blink with. Beak does not occlude. Other eye does not appear to be functioning. Cull or keep?

Not quite sure what you mean by this.

If beak does not function well enough to eat, then cull.

How old is chick?

 

I've seen some incredible loss of skin wounds heal over just fine, tho not on faces.

Avoiding infection is the key, shock can do them in too.

A generic anti-biotic ointment (with no pain relief ingredients, nothing with a -caine in it) can help a great deal.

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

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Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
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