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5 week old social butterfly - Page 2

post #11 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by chickenchichi View Post

One of my two rooster chicks is very socially adept. While both of them will jump onto my shoulder/head, Moses will jump onto anyone regardless of if they're strangers or not. I was just wondering if maybe there's an instinctive chicken reason why he does this, or if maybe it's friendliness?

No, they may be too young at 5 weeks for it to be the beginning of a dominance behavior....

.....it's probably just that they like to be up high and they are not afraid of people.

BUT...It's not a habit I would allow to continue, especially the cockerels...it's cute when they are tiny, but can be devastatingly injurious when they get larger. 

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #12 of 13
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by aart View Post

No, they may be too young at 5 weeks for it to be the beginning of a dominance behavior....
.....it's probably just that they like to be up high and they are not afraid of people.
BUT...It's not a habit I would allow to continue, especially the cockerels...it's cute when they are tiny, but can be devastatingly injurious when they get larger. 
I've started gently pushing them off or lowering them to the ground when they jump now. The calmer roo (a speckled Sussex) seems to be getting it, but the Rhode Island is a slow learner.

I have another question that has popped up since then! One of my hens, our other speckled sussie, has started jumping up on my legs and sitting. From what I've observed, and I've also asked on these forums for opinions, she is most likely if not definitely a pullet. Since she's a pullet, should I still push her off like the cockerels?
post #13 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by chickenchichi View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by aart View Post

No, they may be too young at 5 weeks for it to be the beginning of a dominance behavior....
.....it's probably just that they like to be up high and they are not afraid of people.
BUT...It's not a habit I would allow to continue, especially the cockerels...it's cute when they are tiny, but can be devastatingly injurious when they get larger. 
I've started gently pushing them off or lowering them to the ground when they jump now. The calmer roo (a speckled Sussex) seems to be getting it, but the Rhode Island is a slow learner.

I have another question that has popped up since then! One of my hens, our other speckled sussie, has started jumping up on my legs and sitting. From what I've observed, and I've also asked on these forums for opinions, she is most likely if not definitely a pullet. Since she's a pullet, should I still push her off like the cockerels?

Depends...some folks want their chickens all cuddly on their laps like other pets.

My birds are more livestock than pets and I prefer them to remain with their feet not on me and shove them off if they land on me. I handle my birds from chicks so they get used to it and I can inspect them for pests/problems without too much drama and fear....but once the males show that they are males I handle them much less than the pullets. I have a couple that liked to be picked up and I oblige them, it's funny, but for the most part the only time I touch them is if something is wrong or during the regular inspections that happen at night when I grab them off the roost.

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
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