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Soft eggs

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 
Can any-one help us we keep getting at less one soft egg a day,does any one have any idea on what we can do
post #2 of 8
Hi there frow.gif

I'm sure you will find this article most helpful ~http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/common-egg-quality-problems

# 15 covers soft shell eggs.
post #3 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dollie 1 View Post

Can any-one help us we keep getting at less one soft egg a day,does any one have any idea on what we can do

Try some Human Caltrate pills. These contain all the ingredients needed for a hen to process and use calcium. I have used these for years on old hens or hens with troubles laying soft or yolks with just membranes on them.

 

Cut a Caltrate pill in half. (you can use the generic form as well, same stuff). You are going to give her a half a pill a day. Break this half into smaller pieces yet and stuff them into raisins. She will never know she is being medicated and think she is getting a treat each day. After about 2 days, she should be putting on a hard shell. Keep up with her Caltrate daily. When you start see a LOT of tiny calcium bumps on the shell, you can back down the amount of times a week you give these to her, as she is now getting excess calcium.

 

If she still can not put a shell on even after a week on the Caltrate, then something may be wrong with her shell gland. 

 

Make sure she is not being bullied away from food and water and if you have to, put out more food and water stations. 

 

Keep us posted! :-)

Hope is the thing with feathers that perches in the soul. ~Emily Dickinson~

 

You have not lived today until you have done something for someone who can never repay you.  ~John Bunyan~

 

Treating Sour Crop and Impacted Crop                                    Raising Quail

 

How to Treat Egg Binding in Hens 

 

Leg, Foot and Toe Issues in Poultry of All Ages

Reply

Hope is the thing with feathers that perches in the soul. ~Emily Dickinson~

 

You have not lived today until you have done something for someone who can never repay you.  ~John Bunyan~

 

Treating Sour Crop and Impacted Crop                                    Raising Quail

 

How to Treat Egg Binding in Hens 

 

Leg, Foot and Toe Issues in Poultry of All Ages

Reply
post #4 of 8

Fresh water all the time. toss some cat food to them for extra protein and have the oyster shell full.

Cut back on treats. Free ranging is fine but hold back on the treats.

post #5 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dollie 1 View Post

Can any-one help us we keep getting at less one soft egg a day,does any one have any idea on what we can do

Let's start with the basics:

 

How old are your birds and what is their laying history?

 

What and how exactly are you feeding?

 

What is your climate? Putting your location in your profile can help folks give better answers/suggestions.

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #6 of 8
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by aart View Post

Let's start with the basics:

How old are your birds and what is their laying history?1yr, started laying eggs last October

What and how exactly are you feeding? We are feeding them scratch&chicken feed,my husband fills there triffids when it's empty,an gives them scratch on the ground every day also

What is your climate? Putting your location in your profile can help folks give better answers/suggestions.We live in the middle of the lower peninsula of Michigan
C
Edited by Dollie 1 - 6/10/16 at 8:12am
post #7 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dollie 1 View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by aart View Post

Let's start with the basics:

How old are your birds and what is their laying history?1yr, started laying eggs last October

What and how exactly are you feeding? We are feeding them scratch&chicken feed,my husband fills there triffids when it's empty,an gives them scratch on the ground every day also

What is your climate? Putting your location in your profile can help folks give better answers/suggestions.We live in the middle of the lower peninsula of Michigan
C

What kind of chicken feed...layer feed?

Protein levels are important...layer usually is a minimum of 16% for production, scratch will dilute that.

 

My Feeding Notes: I like to feed a flock raiser/grower/finisher 20% protein crumble to all ages and genders, as non-layers(chicks, males and molting birds) do not need the extra calcium that is in layer feed and chicks and molters can use the extra protein. Makes life much simpler to store and distribute one type of chow that everyone can eat. I do grind up the crumbles (in the blender) for the chicks for the first week or so.

 

The higher protein crumble also offsets the 8% protein scratch grains and other kitchen/garden scraps I like to offer. I adjust the amounts of other feeds to get the protein levels desired with varying situations.

 

Calcium should be available at all times for the layers, I use oyster shell mixed with rinsed, dried, crushed chicken egg shells in a separate container.

 

Animal protein (mealworms, a little cheese - beware the salt content, meat scraps) is provided during molting and if I see any feather eating.

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #8 of 8
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dollie 1 View Post

C
we feed our chickens the layer feed,our chicken wouldn't eat crumble feed or oyster shells

Quote:
Originally Posted by aart View Post

Let's start with the basics:

How old are your birds and what is their laying history?

What and how exactly are you feeding?

What is your climate? Putting your location in your profile can help folks give better answers/suggestions.

Quote:
Originally Posted by aart View Post

What kind of chicken feed...layer feed?
Protein levels are important...layer usually is a minimum of 16% for production, scratch will dilute that.

My Feeding Notes: I like to feed a flock raiser/grower/finisher 20% protein crumble to all ages and genders, as non-layers(chicks, males and molting birds) do not need the extra calcium that is in layer feed and chicks and molters can use the extra protein. Makes life much simpler to store and distribute one type of chow that everyone can eat. I do grind up the crumbles (in the blender) for the chicks for the first week or so.

The higher protein crumble also offsets the 8% protein scratch grains and other kitchen/garden scraps I like to offer. I adjust the amounts of other feeds to get the protein levels desired with varying situations.

Calcium should be available at all times for the layers, I use oyster shell mixed with rinsed, dried, crushed chicken egg shells in a separate container.

Animal protein (mealworms, a little cheese - beware the salt content, meat scraps) is provided during molting and if I see any feather eating.

Edited by Dollie 1 - 6/10/16 at 9:19am
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