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What kind of roofing? - Page 4

post #31 of 44
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dmontgomery View Post

Ya know Clucky, when you started this thread 4 days ago you said you had already blown through your budget weeks ago. Me and TerryH are just making things worse. I'll bet your husband is starting to dislike BYC as much as I dislike my wife looking at Pinterest.

This is cracking me up. Between BYC, Pinterest, and Craig's List, my husband is ready for this build to be done.
Just called him to ask if he could pick up a set of free concrete steps I found on Craig's list. He wasn't very excited about it, but I told him it was either we pick up some free steps, or I was making another trip to Home Depot. We shall see what happens! Haha
post #32 of 44
Hooray for free reclaimed metal! I tore down a friend's barn last year to get barn wood and about 50 sheets of old rusted metal. Our living room ceiling is now all reclaimed metal. But that's off topic. Reclaimed metal means patching some old nail or screw holes. You may need a tube of caulk or black tar roofing patch. You may get lucky and can use the same holes though.
Great job on the screen door!
post #33 of 44
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dmontgomery View Post

Hooray for free reclaimed metal! I tore down a friend's barn last year to get barn wood and about 50 sheets of old rusted metal. Our living room ceiling is now all reclaimed metal. But that's off topic. Reclaimed metal means patching some old nail or screw holes. You may need a tube of caulk or black tar roofing patch. You may get lucky and can use the same holes though.
Great job on the screen door!
Thanks! We also took down a barn last year and saved the wood. It was erected by my husbands great grandfather in the 1920's. We resurfaced our fireplace! Obviously, it wasn't finished in this pic but I absolutely LOVE it.

I'll be sure to do the necessary patch work. Think I should use rafters to hold it up? Or do you think we could get away with using osb board? I already have the osb, and I don't exactly know how to install rafters. I know me and my husband are not very good at cutting those 2x4's at an angle, but I can recruit someone to come help if need be.
Also, is there a good tool to use to cut the metal to size? I have no idea how thick the metal is, but it appears to be in decent shape. He said that they all have a good side & a weathered side- which side should be facing out?

post #34 of 44
Look back at post #12 and 19. Use rafters and put osb over them since you have it. Remember what Terry said about snow load. OSB by itself will sag in the middle. Which side up just matters for looks. Try both ways before you secure it down.
post #35 of 44
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dmontgomery View Post

Look back at post #12 and 19. Use rafters and put osb over them since you have it. Remember what Terry said about snow load. OSB by itself will sag in the middle. Which side up just matters for looks. Try both ways before you secure it down.
Something tells me this roof is going to be the death of me! Wish I could just twinkle my nose and POOF it's done. Thanks!
post #36 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by CluckyInKY View Post

Thanks! We also took down a barn last year and saved the wood. It was erected by my husbands great grandfather in the 1920's. We resurfaced our fireplace! Obviously, it wasn't finished in this pic but I absolutely LOVE it.

I'll be sure to do the necessary patch work. Think I should use rafters to hold it up? Or do you think we could get away with using osb board? I already have the osb, and I don't exactly know how to install rafters. I know me and my husband are not very good at cutting those 2x4's at an angle, but I can recruit someone to come help if need be.
Also, is there a good tool to use to cut the metal to size? I have no idea how thick the metal is, but it appears to be in decent shape. He said that they all have a good side & a weathered side- which side should be facing out?


You will need rafters to support the OSB. You can use 2x4's on edge that are spaced 24" or 16" on center. You can attach them to the walls with strong ties. They will look like this. They are 84 cents each at Home Depot. It's best to cut bird mouths on the 2x4's to fit the top plates on the walls but you can get by without if you use the metal ties.



You can cut the roofing with normal sheet metal snips. Also available at Home Depot for $12,



Good side or weathered side of the metal is just personal preference. The metal can be nailed to the OSB with ring shank washered nails but I'd suggest that you buy washered screws. You will need a little bit of roofing felt paper to cover the OSB.

Screws. $9 per pack.



Roofing felt. $16 for a roll.



I know I'm spending your money again but this is the way to a roof that won't leak and will last basically forever. Hope this helps.
Edited by TerryH - 6/20/16 at 3:44pm

Our coop build thread...

 

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1088771/cheryls-hen-house

 

1Peter 5:2 Care for the flock that God has entrusted to you. Watch over it willingly, not grudgingly—not for what you will get out of it, but because you are eager to serve God.

Reply

Our coop build thread...

 

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1088771/cheryls-hen-house

 

1Peter 5:2 Care for the flock that God has entrusted to you. Watch over it willingly, not grudgingly—not for what you will get out of it, but because you are eager to serve God.

Reply
post #37 of 44
Thread Starter 
Spending $40 on supplies for the roof is a lot better than spending $150, which is what we were looking at before. My husband keeps reminding me that we have already spent around $400 for the coop & run, but it is SO much better than the tiny one at TSC for $230 that he thought we should buy. It says it will hold 6 chickens, but I'd say only 3 in real life, so I would have spent $460 on two coops for my 6 girls... Not to mention those pre built coops are crap.

Thanks for the info!
post #38 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by CluckyInKY View Post

Spending $40 on supplies for the roof is a lot better than spending $150, which is what we were looking at before. My husband keeps reminding me that we have already spent around $400 for the coop & run, but it is SO much better than the tiny one at TSC for $230 that he thought we should buy. It says it will hold 6 chickens, but I'd say only 3 in real life, so I would have spent $460 on two coops for my 6 girls... Not to mention those pre built coops are crap.

Thanks for the info!

Agree. Your coop is WAY better than what you can buy at TSC or such. The roof is probably the most difficult part of the build but also the most important. The life of any wooden structure is to keep it dry. You can do this.

Our coop build thread...

 

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1088771/cheryls-hen-house

 

1Peter 5:2 Care for the flock that God has entrusted to you. Watch over it willingly, not grudgingly—not for what you will get out of it, but because you are eager to serve God.

Reply

Our coop build thread...

 

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1088771/cheryls-hen-house

 

1Peter 5:2 Care for the flock that God has entrusted to you. Watch over it willingly, not grudgingly—not for what you will get out of it, but because you are eager to serve God.

Reply
post #39 of 44
Terry's post looks like my shopping list a couple weeks ago. You said y'all just finished helping your dad on his workshop. If he has a workshop, he may have a jig saw. I use that for small jobs rather than metal shears. Depending on what kind of metal you are getting, it may be really heavy stuff that is tough to cut by hand. On bigger jobs involving a lot of metal I have a circular saw with a metal cutting blade. (That's probably the thing you called a "power saw" a while back) Use hearing protection with power tools.
post #40 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dmontgomery View Post

Terry's post looks like my shopping list a couple weeks ago. You said y'all just finished helping your dad on his workshop. If he has a workshop, he may have a jig saw. I use that for small jobs rather than metal shears. Depending on what kind of metal you are getting, it may be really heavy stuff that is tough to cut by hand. On bigger jobs involving a lot of metal I have a circular saw with a metal cutting blade. (That's probably the thing you called a "power saw" a while back) Use hearing protection with power tools.

Good point about cutting the older metal by hand. As long as we are spending your money, Clucky big_smile.png...I have these metal shears from Harbor Freight. They are awesome. There are HF 20% off coupons all over the innerwebs so you can pick one up for $40.

Linky to metal shears at Harbor Freight

Our coop build thread...

 

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1088771/cheryls-hen-house

 

1Peter 5:2 Care for the flock that God has entrusted to you. Watch over it willingly, not grudgingly—not for what you will get out of it, but because you are eager to serve God.

Reply

Our coop build thread...

 

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1088771/cheryls-hen-house

 

1Peter 5:2 Care for the flock that God has entrusted to you. Watch over it willingly, not grudgingly—not for what you will get out of it, but because you are eager to serve God.

Reply
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