New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

WHAT DOG? - Page 2

post #11 of 16

I have a Maremma dog who loves my birds. Never leaves our property and keeps the fox and coyotes away plus any stray dogs that might come onto my property. Excellent watch dog. 

Any of the Livestock protection breeds are great. Herding breeds do just that..They herd..

post #12 of 16
Quote:

 Herding breeds do just that..They herd..

Among other things.  It's just that they were bred for and excel at herding but these dogs wear many hats.  The English shepherd can herd, guard and even hunt.  The breed standard says one on one they should be able to take down a coyote which isn't exactly herding.

     I've had collies from working lines that could herd and guard and protect.  One went after someone breaking into our home.  This same collie allowed a strange child to take a bone she was chewing out of her mouth when he wasn't sure it was safe for her to have it. (I had given it to her.)

        Another went after a Doberman who was going after her little sheltie brother and sent him packing.

        Bouviers and Briards are in the herding group and can herd, but they were also left with their flocks in remote places to protect as was the German Shepherd.

      These are among the most versatile of dogs.  In addition to being able to herd , some of my herding dogs are titled in obedience, tracking, and agility as well as being excellent protection dogs..

post #13 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by dekel18042 View Post
 

Among other things.  It's just that they were bred for and excel at herding but these dogs wear many hats.  The English shepherd can herd, guard and even hunt.  The breed standard says one on one they should be able to take down a coyote which isn't exactly herding.

     I've had collies from working lines that could herd and guard and protect.  One went after someone breaking into our home.  This same collie allowed a strange child to take a bone she was chewing out of her mouth when he wasn't sure it was safe for her to have it. (I had given it to her.)

        Another went after a Doberman who was going after her little sheltie brother and sent him packing.

        Bouviers and Briards are in the herding group and can herd, but they were also left with their flocks in remote places to protect as was the German Shepherd.

      These are among the most versatile of dogs.  In addition to being able to herd , some of my herding dogs are titled in obedience, tracking, and agility as well as being excellent protection dogs..

I was not debating that. I have Aussie crosses one with Border collie the other Golden retriever. Excellent dogs, but do better with the horses. The one likes to move the ducks around and keeps them confined to a specific area. The other loves to chase them.

My Maremma does exactly what his breed is know to do and that is guard and protect his flock.

All breeds can learn..Others its bred right into them.

post #14 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by dekel18042 View Post

Among other things.  It's just that they were bred for and excel at herding but these dogs wear many hats.  The English shepherd can herd, guard and even hunt.  The breed standard says one on one they should be able to take down a coyote which isn't exactly herding.
     I've had collies from working lines that could herd and guard and protect.  One went after someone breaking into our home.  This same collie allowed a strange child to take a bone she was chewing out of her mouth when he wasn't sure it was safe for her to have it. (I had given it to her.)
        Another went after a Doberman who was going after her little sheltie brother and sent him packing.
        Bouviers and Briards are in the herding group and can herd, but they were also left with their flocks in remote places to protect as was the German Shepherd.
      These are among the most versatile of dogs.  In addition to being able to herd , some of my herding dogs are titled in obedience, tracking, and agility as well as being excellent protection dogs..
Couldnt have said it better.👍🏼
post #15 of 16

I have to agree with the folks that recommended not getting a dog, at least not right now for flock protection. Any dog you get will have to be trained and first-time dog owners usually don't have the knowledge to do that properly. I have a pit-bull -- a bred that naturally has strong small-animal predation tendencies -- but we've trained her not to bother the chickens. I already know she is protective of the property, which is, imo, what you want -- a dog that will protect the property and not bother the chickens (not a pit, but another breed). I know our training is successful, because I can watch her on the security camera when she thinks she is outside by herself.

 

Do what you need to do to protect your flock. With an acre and a half, I can absolutely see wanting a dog, but get the dog as a pet. Dogs will naturally be protective of their territory and of their den-mates (you and your family), but may have to be trained not to go after the chickens.

Allyn at Hinton Homestead on the sunny Mississippi Gulf Coast

36 Delawares

Reply

Allyn at Hinton Homestead on the sunny Mississippi Gulf Coast

36 Delawares

Reply
post #16 of 16
The post above me is an awesome post with great advice.

...maybe fence the property first. Put in a solid sturdy fence, 2x4 welded wire and then establish the coop and run for the chickens.

Once all is well, then get a dog.

"Experince is the teacher of all things." Julius Ceaser

"The only real valuable thing is intuition." Albert Einstein

"Always do right. This will gratify some people and astonish the rest" Mark Twain

 

My Coop Project

 

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/656727/coop-project-maken-the-plunge-getting-chickens

Reply

"Experince is the teacher of all things." Julius Ceaser

"The only real valuable thing is intuition." Albert Einstein

"Always do right. This will gratify some people and astonish the rest" Mark Twain

 

My Coop Project

 

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/656727/coop-project-maken-the-plunge-getting-chickens

Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Managing Your Flock