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to many roos? - Page 2

post #11 of 18

If you want to keep that many roosters you would have to get more hens that are the same age so the roosters can mate with the hens without over mating them.  Over mating will cause injuries and extreme feather loss to the hens from constantly being held down and mounted.  This leads to stress and lower egg production from the hens.  I have experienced this first hand.

 

You could put the roosters in a separate coop and run, but that means buying/building another coop and run.  I haven't tried keeping them separate so research and find out how far apart the coops need to be.  I heard that if you have roosters separated from hens but close enough for them to see each others, the roosters will start fighting each other.  Not sure if that is true.

No other animal works this hard to crap in its own drinking water.

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No other animal works this hard to crap in its own drinking water.

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post #12 of 18
Why do you want those males? The only reason you need a rooster is if you want fertile eggs. Anything else is a personal preference, not a need. I always recommend you keep as few roosters as you can and still meet your goals. That’s not because you are guaranteed problems with more roosters, just that problems are more likely. Sounds like your sister has a strong personal preference.

Many people confuse cockerels and pullets with roosters and hens. Imagine a mixed-sex group of 21 9th graders left alone for weeks with no adult supervision. Now imagine a group of mature responsible adults in that same situation. Would you expect the results to be the same? A flock of adolescent chickens can be hard to watch as they go through puberty and mature into adults. Even if adult chickens are in the flock it can get pretty rough with the adolescents. But a flock of adult chickens is often quite peaceful. There are some restrictions though.

One huge factor in how multiple roosters and hens get long in the flock is room. If the roosters can claim a territory where they can stay away from each other with their harems things are usually OK. One of our members, Centrarchid, has a lot of experience with this. But we are talking about a lot more room than the vast majority of people on this forum have. That’s just not a viable solution for most of us.

Many breeders keep one or two hens with one rooster for the breeding season with no problems of over-mating or barebacked hens. A big factor in that being successful is that the rooster and hens are mature, not adolescents. Some forum members have over-mating and barebacked hen problems with one rooster and over 20 hens, even occasionally with mature flocks. There are so many different factors involved, including the individual personality of the chickens, that there can be no magic ratio where everything works out. We are all unique in our set-ups and management techniques and each flock has its own dynamics.

Every year I hatch and raise chicks with the flock until butcher age for the cockerels, around 5 to 6 months of age usually. Some years I hatch a lot more pullets than cockerels, some years I have a lot more cockerels than pullets. Usually that goes without any real problems. It does get hectic down there but I have a lot of room. The pullets can get away from the cockerels if they need to. I’ve never had a pullet injured or too stressed out from over-mating. I have seen pullets avoid the cockerels sometimes, not always, but I have enough room they can do that. I did have one cockerel kill another cockerel once. I’ve been doing this a lot of years, I’ve had that happen once.

I don’t know how much room you have but I feel fairly confident that you may not have enough room to let them all range together. It does take a lot of room with multiple cockerels or multiple roosters. There is a fairly simple solution, a bachelor pad. Build a pen to house the males. You can leave one cockerel with the pullets if you wish. You can try two cockerels with the pullets if you want to but I wouldn’t go beyond that without a lot of room. If you lock the boys up together with no females to fight over they normally get along pretty well. They will establish a pecking order and all that but it’s usually not much worse than what you see in an all-hen flock. While you can expect some rough times with adolescents that may allow your sister to have her roosters and you to have a peaceful flock, at least after they grow up.

Good luck!

 I grow a little impatient when people seem to think that they are unique in the world. Of course they are. Just like everyone else.

 

http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/how-much-room-do-chickens-need

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 I grow a little impatient when people seem to think that they are unique in the world. Of course they are. Just like everyone else.

 

http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/how-much-room-do-chickens-need

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post #13 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by chickengeorgeto View Post
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

How's about getting a new Sister?????   :lau Ok I'll get serous.  And I promise that you can keep your sister.    ​

 

For the number of roosters that you currently own you will likely need 140 hens plus a similar increase in space.to both make and keep everyone happy.


140 hens, no no and no couldn't I just build a rooster pen???

post #14 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by chickengeorgeto View Post
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

How's about getting a new Sister?????   :lau Ok I'll get serous.  And I promise that you can keep your sister.    ​

 

For the number of roosters that you currently own you will likely need 140 hens plus a similar increase in space.to both make and keep everyone happy.

:yuckyuck

post #15 of 18
Thread Starter 

i think we will build a rooster house...

post #16 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by gemma24 View Post
 

i think we will build a rooster house...

No problem, but do not be shocked if the strongest rooster in your roo pen "mistakes" the weaker ones for hens.  This is especially true when there is a large difference in age or size. RHIP is the whole thing with chickens and the pecking order.

 

RHIP = Rank Has It's Privileges.

Keep your chickens safe from predators, buy and wear fur. 
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Keep your chickens safe from predators, buy and wear fur. 
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post #17 of 18

You don't have roosters and hens yet. At this point you simply have babies, who don't care what gender each other are. 

 

Your sister is going to feel a lot different in 3 months when two or more cockerels pin down one of her pullets and gang mate her repeatedly, while she screams and fights. Sorry to be blunt, but that's what's going to happen if you keep them all together. 

 

You can run a bachelor pad, but I'm not sure why? Why keep all those freeloader males? Keep one or maybe two and get rid of the rest. 

Rachel BB

Stem cell transplant from unrelated donor in Feb 2015. Thank you to all my friends here on BYC for all your support during my treatment and ongoing recovery!

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Rachel BB

Stem cell transplant from unrelated donor in Feb 2015. Thank you to all my friends here on BYC for all your support during my treatment and ongoing recovery!

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post #18 of 18

I have too many roosters too and I knew they were roosters when I bought them. I had already decided they were going in the freezer though. I hope to do this before my girls and the boys are mature enough for the hormones to kick in. If not I plan to put my few hens in a chicken tractor and let the boys free-range until the boys can be dealt with. Hopefully with all the area to roam it will use up some of that energy. I may or may not keep one roo. Sometimes roosters seem to pick a favorite girl that gets too much attention if that happens maybe just do with out a rooster. Unless you want chicks you don't need one anyway.

I am the original Red Neck Woman, the Wildbunch AKA my children, and my husband have recently moved to the boonies. 3 1/2 acres with 3 ponds and surrounded by woods.
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I am the original Red Neck Woman, the Wildbunch AKA my children, and my husband have recently moved to the boonies. 3 1/2 acres with 3 ponds and surrounded by woods.
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