New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Permethrin spray - Page 13

post #121 of 134
I just treated one, and I'm too lazy to apply cream, so I filled the bath/shower stal with 3" warm and let her sit for 30 minutes. Then I cleaned all the nasty, crusty stuff off, dipped the legs in Novalsan, and gave oral ivermectin. Couple spots were pretty raw, so kept her in a clean crate until they had a nice, healthy scab. Quite unorthodox according to what I have read, but didn't want to deal with repeat treatments.

And yes, I know ivermectin is not approved for laying hens, but this is an old hen that probably hasn't laid in years.
post #122 of 134
Thread Starter 

Did you have to treat your entire flock?  Does anything work if only one bird is treated?  I thought all the birds would have scaly mites if one does. Mary 

post #123 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by Folly's place View Post
 

Did you have to treat your entire flock?  Does anything work if only one bird is treated?  I thought all the birds would have scaly mites if one does. Mary 

There maybe more, but she was the only one in that coop with them. 


Edited by casportpony - 3/20/17 at 9:24pm
post #124 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by casportpony View Post
 

Gordon's looks like this:

This is some great stuff, thanks.

post #125 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by casportpony View Post

I just treated one, and I'm too lazy to apply cream, so I filled the bath/shower stal with 3" warm and let her sit for 30 minutes. Then I cleaned all the nasty, crusty stuff off, dipped the legs in Novalsan, and gave oral ivermectin. Couple spots were pretty raw, so kept her in a clean crate until they had a nice, healthy scab. Quite unorthodox according to what I have read, but didn't want to deal with repeat treatments.

And yes, I know ivermectin is not approved for laying hens, but this is an old hen that probably hasn't laid in years.

Doing all that seems much more time consuming than rubbing on some goop. 

So I don't think 'lazy' is the issue.;)

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Folly's place View Post
 

Did you have to treat your entire flock?  Does anything work if only one bird is treated?  I thought all the birds would have scaly mites if one does. Mary 

They can and do spread, but very slowly.

I have some with them and some have never had them.

Can take a loooong time to see scales fully restored.


Edited by aart - 3/21/17 at 7:25am

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #126 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by aart View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by casportpony View Post

I just treated one, and I'm too lazy to apply cream, so I filled the bath/shower stal with 3" warm and let her sit for 30 minutes. Then I cleaned all the nasty, crusty stuff off, dipped the legs in Novalsan, and gave oral ivermectin. Couple spots were pretty raw, so kept her in a clean crate until they had a nice, healthy scab. Quite unorthodox according to what I have read, but didn't want to deal with repeat treatments.


And yes, I know ivermectin is not approved for laying hens, but this is an old hen that probably hasn't laid in years.
Doing all that seems much more time consuming than rubbing on some goop. 
So I don't think 'lazy' is the issue.wink.png
Quote:
Originally Posted by Folly's place View Post

 
Did you have to treat your entire flock?  Does anything work if only one bird is treated?  I thought all the birds would have scaly mites if one does. Mary 
They can and do spread, but very slowly.
I have some with them and some have never had them.
Can take a loooong time to see scales fully restored.
It was one day of treatment vs. who know's how many, so I chose one day.
post #127 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by casportpony View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by aart View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by casportpony View Post

I just treated one, and I'm too lazy to apply cream, so I filled the bath/shower stal with 3" warm and let her sit for 30 minutes. Then I cleaned all the nasty, crusty stuff off, dipped the legs in Novalsan, and gave oral ivermectin. Couple spots were pretty raw, so kept her in a clean crate until they had a nice, healthy scab. Quite unorthodox according to what I have read, but didn't want to deal with repeat treatments.


And yes, I know ivermectin is not approved for laying hens, but this is an old hen that probably hasn't laid in years.
Doing all that seems much more time consuming than rubbing on some goop. 
So I don't think 'lazy' is the issue.wink.png
 
It was one day of treatment vs. who know's how many, so I chose one day.

Usually only takes 1 application of the bag balm if you catch it early enough, worse cases take 2.

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #128 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by Folly's place View Post
 

Did you have to treat your entire flock?  Does anything work if only one bird is treated?  I thought all the birds would have scaly mites if one does. Mary 

Thank you all for the great discussion. 

 

Does health of individual birds have anything to do with who they choose?

post #129 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by EggSighted4Life View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Folly's place View Post

 
Did you have to treat your entire flock?  Does anything work if only one bird is treated?  I thought all the birds would have scaly mites if one does. Mary 
Thank you all for the great discussion. 

Does health of individual birds have anything to do with who they choose?
Maybe? I read somewhere that it's usually older birds that get them, but I have no idea if that true or not.
post #130 of 134
One thing I found interesting it that peafowl, Guineas, and turkeys don't seem to get them.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Predators and Pests