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How to Price Eggs?

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 

Not sure if this is the right place for this, but I'm perplexed!

 

We are getting enough eggs from our 37 6-7 month old pullets to do small-scale sales. Most of our eggs go to the family and to our chicken start-up investor, who takes a share of 4 dozen a week in repayment. We spend $300-400 in organic feed every 2-3 months, about $5 in feed per bird per month, I believe - I'm not sure what's average. We hadn't been washing eggs until use, because we counter-keep them, but aren't sure about the added time/labor cost of washing for wider sale. For pastured, organic eggs we see them going for $8 in the grocery store, $2-4 in the backcountry around our metro area at roadsides and on craigslist, $6 at market. For now we're just considering direct sales. We'd like to make a little profit on top of recouping costs if possible, to allow us to continue to grow, but also want to be fair to customers who are also mostly our friends.

 

Thanks!

post #2 of 8

I would say that you should test the market.  Take your expenses for feed into account.  Start competitive with what you see for organic at the stores, and reduce from there if you need to.  I sell for $3/doz for full sized eggs.  I'm in a rural area, and that seems to be the going road side price.  My customers are hooked on my eggs b/c the girls get FF.  There is a subtle, but discernible difference in flavor, IMO.  I do realize that eggs can be bought at discount in grocery stores for about 1/2 of that price.  But, I'll not apologize for my price, nor will I reduce price.  I would most likely start feeding them to the dog or back to the chickens than to drop price to match the ancient flavorless offerings from Wally World.  

Ephesians 2:10  For we are his workmanship, created in Christ Jesus for good works, which God prepared beforehand, that we should walk in them.

 

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1013154/byc-member-interview-lazy-gardener

http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/yes-you-certainly-can-brood-chicks-outdoors

https://tikktok.wordpress.com/2014/04/13/fermented-feed-faq/

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Ephesians 2:10  For we are his workmanship, created in Christ Jesus for good works, which God prepared beforehand, that we should walk in them.

 

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1013154/byc-member-interview-lazy-gardener

http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/yes-you-certainly-can-brood-chicks-outdoors

https://tikktok.wordpress.com/2014/04/13/fermented-feed-faq/

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post #3 of 8
I agree with @lazy gardener - you'll want to calculate your costs (including labor) as well as determine what the market will bear. I'm also in a rural area and I sell my eggs from pastured chickens who eat fermented non-GMO supplemental feed for $3.50/dozen. They sell for $4/dozen at local farmer's markets, and for as low as $2/doz on CL. A note about CL - the cheap eggs I've seen are not fed a non-GMO diet and aren't pastured; these prices tend to be posted by hobbyists who have a few dozen "extra" eggs they want to offload. I sell my eggs to customers who appreciate quality, nutritious eggs from chickens with a good quality of life. They don't bat an eye at the price because they understand that what they're getting isn't old eggs from battery cage hens that have been discounted by retailers so they're actually losing money on the eggs (they have a strategy: they make up their money on accompaniments like bacon). Aside from the ethical piece, my customers love the taste -discriminating palates appreciate the difference. I'm not trying to get people who have a "fast food mentality" to buy my eggs...and I can eat a lot of eggs.

Re price: you're better off pricing your eggs higher initially and slightly decreasing the price (if needed) than the reverse.

Absque sudore et labore nullum opus perfectum est

 

 

Proudly raising: Muscovies; a Runner, a Pekin, and their mixed offspring; various breeds of dual-purpose chickens including American Bresse and French Black Copper Marans; and several rabbit breeds.

 

unabashed logophile | mad zymurgist | compulsive philomath | pro-Oxford comma

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Absque sudore et labore nullum opus perfectum est

 

 

Proudly raising: Muscovies; a Runner, a Pekin, and their mixed offspring; various breeds of dual-purpose chickens including American Bresse and French Black Copper Marans; and several rabbit breeds.

 

unabashed logophile | mad zymurgist | compulsive philomath | pro-Oxford comma

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post #4 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by lazy gardener View Post
 

I would say that you should test the market.  Take your expenses for feed into account.  Start competitive with what you see for organic at the stores, and reduce from there if you need to.  I sell for $3/doz for full sized eggs.  I'm in a rural area, and that seems to be the going road side price.  My customers are hooked on my eggs b/c the girls get FF.  There is a subtle, but discernible difference in flavor, IMO.  I do realize that eggs can be bought at discount in grocery stores for about 1/2 of that price.  But, I'll not apologize for my price, nor will I reduce price.  I would most likely start feeding them to the dog or back to the chickens than to drop price to match the ancient flavorless offerings from Wally World.  

Pretty much hit the nail on the head. Here in MN I sell mine for $3/doz also. Any higher and I got that sour look and the "Maybe nextime" any lower and it seems like I would break even or lose out a little.

post #5 of 8

Although I only have a baker's dozen hens, I still end up with 5-6 dozen eggs a week. I sell them for $4 a dozen easily while I have a coworker with chickens that has trouble selling hers for more than $3. Although her chickens are producing Jumbo sized eggs, I think I have more appeal as mine do free range and the colors vary from white and pinkish brown on through the green blue spectrum.  I am definitely not trying to make money on the eggs, but rather offset feed costs and make sure I have all the eggs I want.  Beyond feed, the surplus money from eggs goes back into the homestead.  

 

As far as your question, I think it has been well answered with figuring in expenses. You may never "re-coop" all your expenses on your chickens, but if you price your eggs correctly you can definitely offset the cost of feed and the monthly expenditures become neutral.  I know my free chickens cost me about $400 after my coop and run were finished, but I overbuilt for strength and room to grow my flock.  

Chickens...The pet that poops breakfast!

The Krafty Keebs Homestead...A small semi-rural homestead where we are raising chickens and working on making life more simple. We recycle and up-cycle anything that we can.

http://www.kraftykeebs.com

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Chickens...The pet that poops breakfast!

The Krafty Keebs Homestead...A small semi-rural homestead where we are raising chickens and working on making life more simple. We recycle and up-cycle anything that we can.

http://www.kraftykeebs.com

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post #6 of 8
I sell mine to academic types for $5/dozen. All depends on what your base is willing to pay for quality eggs.
post #7 of 8
Does anybody know if I should price my game gen eggs more than my regular laying hens eggs. Please help.
post #8 of 8

Jimmy, if the eggs are being sold to eat, I'd price them the same no matter what kind of hen they come from--unless people think there's something special about them (If you've got someone asking specially for the game hen eggs, that's when I'd suggest pricing them higher.) Of course, if you're selling eggs for hatching, then base it on what's normal for your breed--but for eating, most people don't care what breed of chicken the egg came from.

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