New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Northern Lights? - Page 3

post #21 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by chickens really View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kasilofchrisn View Post

While there are plenty of Alaskans choosing to live without power and running water most of us on the road system here have such luxuries.
I know there is the reality show in McCarthy where they raise animals off grid.
But I don't know about chickens.
Of course it matters not to me as I have power and choose to use it.
I work in the extreme arctic flying to work for 3 weeks then flying homework 3 weeks off.
Chickens would not survive there in wintertime. But not just because of lack of light.
It gets real cold and real windy.
Long periods of both.
I've only seen -62*f personally but know others have seen -80*f.
I've seen wind chills down to-100*f and colder.
Also ground blizzards are common there.
Any crack will see snow infiltrate.
Whole pickup truck cabs packed full because a smoker left a window cracked 1/4".
So your coop couldn't be ventilated traditionally.
Plus the storms last for several days sometimes.
Here's a good picture of my work truck after such a storm.
e6a5701b68a93e0853aa5a0e61d985ec.jpg

Yeah....My Brother worked up North and a friend moved to Yellowknife..........Not to many understand how COLD, cold really is....

 

Cool PICTURE........

 

 

Cheers!


Yes extreme cold is hard to deal with.
Fortunately I'm half polar bear.lol
But wind? No wind gets to everybody except maybe arctic fox and polar bears.
There are several trucks parked in that picture plugged in at a bull rail.
I have been stuck in camp for as many as 3 days waiting on a storm to end.
It's bad when you can't see 25' outside even with lights.
Above the arctic circle we go over 21 days where the sun doesn't rise above the horizon.
It gets light out but it's like dusk out for just a few hours at most.
I'm guessing above the arctic circle would absolutely need artificial lights.
But I'm not looking to find out.
post #22 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kasilofchrisn View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by chickens really View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kasilofchrisn View Post

While there are plenty of Alaskans choosing to live without power and running water most of us on the road system here have such luxuries.
I know there is the reality show in McCarthy where they raise animals off grid.
But I don't know about chickens.
Of course it matters not to me as I have power and choose to use it.
I work in the extreme arctic flying to work for 3 weeks then flying homework 3 weeks off.
Chickens would not survive there in wintertime. But not just because of lack of light.
It gets real cold and real windy.
Long periods of both.
I've only seen -62*f personally but know others have seen -80*f.
I've seen wind chills down to-100*f and colder.
Also ground blizzards are common there.
Any crack will see snow infiltrate.
Whole pickup truck cabs packed full because a smoker left a window cracked 1/4".
So your coop couldn't be ventilated traditionally.
Plus the storms last for several days sometimes.
Here's a good picture of my work truck after such a storm.
e6a5701b68a93e0853aa5a0e61d985ec.jpg

Yeah....My Brother worked up North and a friend moved to Yellowknife..........Not to many understand how COLD, cold really is....

 

Cool PICTURE........

 

 

Cheers!


Yes extreme cold is hard to deal with.
Fortunately I'm half polar bear.lol
But wind? No wind gets to everybody except maybe arctic fox and polar bears.
There are several trucks parked in that picture plugged in at a bull rail.
I have been stuck in camp for as many as 3 days waiting on a storm to end.
It's bad when you can't see 25' outside even with lights.
Above the arctic circle we go over 21 days where the sun doesn't rise above the horizon.
It gets light out but it's like dusk out for just a few hours at most.
I'm guessing above the arctic circle would absolutely need artificial lights.
But I'm not looking to find out.

Stay warm. safe and well fed...........

 

Cheers to you........

Bouncers Mom..........Quack!
Reply
Bouncers Mom..........Quack!
Reply
post #23 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by chickens really View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kasilofchrisn View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by chickens really View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kasilofchrisn View Post

While there are plenty of Alaskans choosing to live without power and running water most of us on the road system here have such luxuries.
I know there is the reality show in McCarthy where they raise animals off grid.
But I don't know about chickens.
Of course it matters not to me as I have power and choose to use it.
I work in the extreme arctic flying to work for 3 weeks then flying homework 3 weeks off.
Chickens would not survive there in wintertime. But not just because of lack of light.
It gets real cold and real windy.
Long periods of both.
I've only seen -62*f personally but know others have seen -80*f.
I've seen wind chills down to-100*f and colder.
Also ground blizzards are common there.
Any crack will see snow infiltrate.
Whole pickup truck cabs packed full because a smoker left a window cracked 1/4".
So your coop couldn't be ventilated traditionally.
Plus the storms last for several days sometimes.
Here's a good picture of my work truck after such a storm.
e6a5701b68a93e0853aa5a0e61d985ec.jpg

Yeah....My Brother worked up North and a friend moved to Yellowknife..........Not to many understand how COLD, cold really is....

 

Cool PICTURE........

 

 

Cheers!


Yes extreme cold is hard to deal with.
Fortunately I'm half polar bear.lol
But wind? No wind gets to everybody except maybe arctic fox and polar bears.
There are several trucks parked in that picture plugged in at a bull rail.
I have been stuck in camp for as many as 3 days waiting on a storm to end.
It's bad when you can't see 25' outside even with lights.
Above the arctic circle we go over 21 days where the sun doesn't rise above the horizon.
It gets light out but it's like dusk out for just a few hours at most.
I'm guessing above the arctic circle would absolutely need artificial lights.
But I'm not looking to find out.

Stay warm. safe and well fed...........

 

Cheers to you........

Thanks!
And thank god I'm not in the Arctic full time.
3 strips of thick cut bacon,3 of my farm fresh eggs,2 slices wheat toast,and a cup of hot Chaga tea (harvested myself) w/honey.
My morning is good already and I'm definitely warm,safe and well fed.
post #24 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by aart View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kasilofchrisn View Post

Greetings from South Central Alaska!
This is my first try at chickens here in Alaska.
To be honest I don't just want my chickens to survive.
I want them to thrive.
So while your question is only about survival light I don't care about them just surviving.
I have a heat lamp in my coop on a timer so they have 14 hours of light.
It was -13*f this morning but I got 7 eggs for 7 hens today.
 

Curious......Is the heat light red? Why would you only provide heat 14 hours a day?

I believe white light is needed for lay thru winter.....

.....and, I'm assuming your birds are under a year old, pullets usually lay thru their first winter anyway, lights or not.

Here's a pretty good article on supplemental lighting. 

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kasilofchrisn View Post


I understand the curiosity aspect but I'm guessing you'll need to use your google Fu and find a scientific study somewhere if there is one.
 

I merely asked if your light was red......and I did provide a link to an article by a poultry vet about light color and winter laying.

I understand why you might need to use heat, just wondered why not 24/7.

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #25 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kasilofchrisn View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by chickens really View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kasilofchrisn View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by chickens really View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kasilofchrisn View Post

While there are plenty of Alaskans choosing to live without power and running water most of us on the road system here have such luxuries.
I know there is the reality show in McCarthy where they raise animals off grid.
But I don't know about chickens.
Of course it matters not to me as I have power and choose to use it.
I work in the extreme arctic flying to work for 3 weeks then flying homework 3 weeks off.
Chickens would not survive there in wintertime. But not just because of lack of light.
It gets real cold and real windy.
Long periods of both.
I've only seen -62*f personally but know others have seen -80*f.
I've seen wind chills down to-100*f and colder.
Also ground blizzards are common there.
Any crack will see snow infiltrate.
Whole pickup truck cabs packed full because a smoker left a window cracked 1/4".
So your coop couldn't be ventilated traditionally.
Plus the storms last for several days sometimes.
Here's a good picture of my work truck after such a storm.
e6a5701b68a93e0853aa5a0e61d985ec.jpg

Yeah....My Brother worked up North and a friend moved to Yellowknife..........Not to many understand how COLD, cold really is....

 

Cool PICTURE........

 

 

Cheers!


Yes extreme cold is hard to deal with.
Fortunately I'm half polar bear.lol
But wind? No wind gets to everybody except maybe arctic fox and polar bears.
There are several trucks parked in that picture plugged in at a bull rail.
I have been stuck in camp for as many as 3 days waiting on a storm to end.
It's bad when you can't see 25' outside even with lights.
Above the arctic circle we go over 21 days where the sun doesn't rise above the horizon.
It gets light out but it's like dusk out for just a few hours at most.
I'm guessing above the arctic circle would absolutely need artificial lights.
But I'm not looking to find out.

Stay warm. safe and well fed...........

 

Cheers to you........

Thanks!
And thank god I'm not in the Arctic full time.
3 strips of thick cut bacon,3 of my farm fresh eggs,2 slices wheat toast,and a cup of hot Chaga tea (harvested myself) w/honey.
My morning is good already and I'm definitely warm,safe and well fed.

:yesss:....Cheers!

Bouncers Mom..........Quack!
Reply
Bouncers Mom..........Quack!
Reply
post #26 of 31

The thing to understand about heating a coop in real cold is that a red heat lamp doesn't make it warm;  it raises the temperature by several degrees, but my water in all my coops still freezes hard after several hours and I'm not exactly walking in there and taking off my coat.  In the event of an outage, hopefully the temp in the coo would decline slowly enough for them to acclimate.

My coops are big as I have no runs (birds free range) so maybe people with smaller spaces to heat get theirs warmer.

post #27 of 31
The way I figure it my heat lamp gives them a place to warm up during the day if they need it.
It may not warm the whole coop but they can get warmth from it as needed.
Just like I take warm up breaks when outside for long periods.
My birds are thriving and that's what counts.
post #28 of 31
The way I figure it my heat lamp gives them a place to warm up during the day if they need it.
It may not warm the whole coop but they can get warmth from it as needed.
Just like I take warm up breaks when outside for long periods.
My birds are thriving and that's what counts.
post #29 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by aart View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by aart View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kasilofchrisn View Post

Greetings from South Central Alaska!
This is my first try at chickens here in Alaska.
To be honest I don't just want my chickens to survive.
I want them to thrive.
So while your question is only about survival light I don't care about them just surviving.
I have a heat lamp in my coop on a timer so they have 14 hours of light.
It was -13*f this morning but I got 7 eggs for 7 hens today.
 

Curious......Is the heat light red? Why would you only provide heat 14 hours a day?

I believe white light is needed for lay thru winter.....

.....and, I'm assuming your birds are under a year old, pullets usually lay thru their first winter anyway, lights or not.

Here's a pretty good article on supplemental lighting. 

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kasilofchrisn View Post


I understand the curiosity aspect but I'm guessing you'll need to use your google Fu and find a scientific study somewhere if there is one.
 

I merely asked if your light was red......and I did provide a link to an article by a poultry vet about light color and winter laying.

I understand why you might need to use heat, just wondered why not 24/7.

Sorry that part was meant for the original poster on figuring out how far north do chickens survive without light.
I'm guessing they will need to find a scientific study for that as its unlikely anyone here could answer from our own experience.
I know I'd be hard pressed to say my chicken died from lack of daylight.

If my chickens show signs of trouble or we see prolonged extreme cold I'll up the heat to 24/7 with a milkhouse heater (already purchased on sale)and put a regular bulb in the timed heat lamp.
But so far I'm not seeing as they need it.
No my light isn't red.
It provides both light and heat and is secured from falling by a quick link and an eye Bolt.
post #30 of 31

I double secure all my lights with both the mounting hardware they come with, and zip ties on the cords to a different mounting location.  I also check them weekly to make sure the bulbs are tight in the sockets.

I didn't think I would heat my coops this winter but I don't regret making the choice.  I watch my birds carefully and I can see they are much more comfortable.  It's -18 here today and everyone is under the lamps.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Managing Your Flock