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Originally Posted by Kasilofchrisn View Post
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kasilofchrisn View Post

Greetings from South Central Alaska!
This is my first try at chickens here in Alaska.
To be honest I don't just want my chickens to survive.
I want them to thrive.
So while your question is only about survival light I don't care about them just surviving.
I have a heat lamp in my coop on a timer so they have 14 hours of light.
It was -13*f this morning but I got 7 eggs for 7 hens today.
 

Curious......Is the heat light red? Why would you only provide heat 14 hours a day?

I believe white light is needed for lay thru winter.....

.....and, I'm assuming your birds are under a year old, pullets usually lay thru their first winter anyway, lights or not.

Here's a pretty good article on supplemental lighting. 

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kasilofchrisn View Post


I understand the curiosity aspect but I'm guessing you'll need to use your google Fu and find a scientific study somewhere if there is one.
 

I merely asked if your light was red......and I did provide a link to an article by a poultry vet about light color and winter laying.

I understand why you might need to use heat, just wondered why not 24/7.

Sorry that part was meant for the original poster on figuring out how far north do chickens survive without light.
I'm guessing they will need to find a scientific study for that as its unlikely anyone here could answer from our own experience.
I know I'd be hard pressed to say my chicken died from lack of daylight.

If my chickens show signs of trouble or we see prolonged extreme cold I'll up the heat to 24/7 with a milkhouse heater (already purchased on sale)and put a regular bulb in the timed heat lamp.
But so far I'm not seeing as they need it.
No my light isn't red.
It provides both light and heat and is secured from falling by a quick link and an eye Bolt.

Ah ok, thanks, hard to tell on these sometimes.

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

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Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply