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Ideas for breeds of chickens! - Page 7

post #61 of 89

It's always a possibility of getting frost bite but there are some things you can do to prevent it. First off, make sure you have proper ventilation in the coop. That is key because too much moisture in the coop increases the risk of frost bite. Also, I put Eucerin on at night for the girls who have the single combs. Some people say this works, some don't, but it makes me feel better if I do. It supposedly prevents unwanted moisture from sticking to their combs. Some people use Vaseline. It does help the chickens for recovery though if they do get it. 

 

I wouldn't lock them in a coop unless they are going to exposed to wind or other elements. Chickens can handle weather well as long as they have food and water. But at night, Lock the coop up. Except for that ventilation. 

 

You can read more about frost bite here:

http://www.the-chicken-chick.com/2013/12/frostbit-in-backyard-chickens-causes.html 

 

And this has been my ultimate guide to how to get winter ready:

http://www.the-chicken-chick.com/2013/11/surviving-winter-with-chickens.html

 

Hope this helps!

post #62 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by rdcowman View Post
 

Prosper! It's 16% protein! I get it at Theisen's.  I wanted to feed them Nutrena feed but i couldn't afford it.  When i get chicks i will probably give them Country feeds Chick Starter Grower! Have you ever used Country feeds before? I haven't. Any ideas for any chick starter food?  I don't really want to use Purina. 

When i got them they were 1 1/2 yrs old.  They will be 2 in the spring i'm guessing!  When i talked to the lady i bought them from, i asked her if they were all laying before i got them, She said " I have so many i am not sure who is laying. But i have a lot of green eggs everyday so some are!" 

It's normal for hens to stop laying for a few weeks after a big move to a new home. This time of year, molting and shorter days also have parts to play in production rate. However, non-laying birds should not be fed layer feed. The high calcium levels can be very damaging. I've found that Easter Eggers need more protein than other breeds. Purina Flock Raiser is the only feed that I can find locally with 20% protein content, so that is the only thing I have ever fed my flock.

post #63 of 89
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by junebuggena View Post
 

It's normal for hens to stop laying for a few weeks after a big move to a new home. This time of year, molting and shorter days also have parts to play in production rate. However, non-laying birds should not be fed layer feed. The high calcium levels can be very damaging. I've found that Easter Eggers need more protein than other breeds. Purina Flock Raiser is the only feed that I can find locally with 20% protein content, so that is the only thing I have ever fed my flock.

Ok so maybe i should switch?? When i switch food do i mix the food together, and do more of Purina and less of prosper every time they need food? I do feed them layer feed!

Never thought of that! 

Thanks for telling me that!;)

5 Rhode Island Reds, 5 Ameraucana's! I love my chickens!
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5 Rhode Island Reds, 5 Ameraucana's! I love my chickens!
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post #64 of 89

Layer feed is for actively laying birds only, not feed for layer-breed birds. Very common newbie mistake. It also is not required for egg production. It has no magic ingredient in it, just less protein and a lot more calcium.

You can go straight to feeding any other feed. The basic ingredients in 99% of feeds are pretty much the same.

post #65 of 89
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by junebuggena View Post
 

Layer feed is for actively laying birds only, not feed for layer-breed birds. Very common newbie mistake. It also is not required for egg production. It has no magic ingredient in it, just less protein and a lot more calcium.

You can go straight to feeding any other feed. The basic ingredients in 99% of feeds are pretty much the same.

Ok so i should switch to purina?  Does regular feed have calcium in it, or does layer feed the only one that has lot of calcium in it?

Any ideas for chick starter feed?

5 Rhode Island Reds, 5 Ameraucana's! I love my chickens!
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5 Rhode Island Reds, 5 Ameraucana's! I love my chickens!
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post #66 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by rdcowman View Post
 

Ok so i should switch to purina?  Does regular feed have calcium in it, or does layer feed the only one that has lot of calcium in it?

Any ideas for chick starter feed?

Only layer feed contains really high calcium levels, but it's always a good idea to check the labels. For chick starter, any feed with a protein content of at least 18% and a maximum calcium content of 1.5% will be just fine. I choose to feed Flock Raiser because it's just simpler to buy and distribute one feed that is safe for everybody. They all get everything they need nutritionally, and I don't have to worry about the calcium intake of the young birds, roosters, and hens that aren't laying due to brooding or molt. Crushed oyster shell is always available separately for those that need it.

post #67 of 89
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by junebuggena View Post
 

Only layer feed contains really high calcium levels, but it's always a good idea to check the labels. For chick starter, any feed with a protein content of at least 18% and a maximum calcium content of 1.5% will be just fine. I choose to feed Flock Raiser because it's just simpler to buy and distribute one feed that is safe for everybody. They all get everything they need nutritionally, and I don't have to worry about the calcium intake of the young birds, roosters, and hens that aren't laying due to brooding or molt. Crushed oyster shell is always available separately for those that need it.

So you feed Purina flock raiser to chicks and your big chickens!?

Thanks so much!

5 Rhode Island Reds, 5 Ameraucana's! I love my chickens!
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5 Rhode Island Reds, 5 Ameraucana's! I love my chickens!
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post #68 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by rdcowman View Post
 

So you feed Purina flock raiser to chicks and your big chickens!?

Thanks so much!

Yep. Everybody gets it. Between roosters, broody hens, molting birds, and young chicks integrating into the flock, it just doesn't make sense for me to ever bother with layer feed.

post #69 of 89
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by junebuggena View Post
 

Yep. Everybody gets it. Between roosters, broody hens, molting birds, and young chicks integrating into the flock, it just doesn't make sense for me to ever bother with layer feed.

When i first was thinking about getting chicks i thought that i would have to have 2 different feeds, and it would take a lot of money for 2 feeds, so that makes a lot of sense!

Thanks so much!;) 

5 Rhode Island Reds, 5 Ameraucana's! I love my chickens!
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5 Rhode Island Reds, 5 Ameraucana's! I love my chickens!
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post #70 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by junebuggena View Post

Yep. Everybody gets it. Between roosters, broody hens, molting birds, and young chicks integrating into the flock, it just doesn't make sense for me to ever bother with layer feed.
When I first got chickens I just did with the feed store told me. I bought chick starter. Then later changed to layer feed. Then had to get chick starter for the new chicks I got etc. etc. now I just feed everybody one feed, grower feed which is basically like flock raiser, and put calcium on the side. It is so much easier and I am so glad I learned about that here on the forum.
If you ask 20 people what the best brand of chicken feed is you will probably get 15 different answers.
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