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A mean rooster or a nice one? 😟

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
So I found myself on a post about an aggressive rooster, and it got me thinking about my own rooster, a New Hampshire Red. He's not mean at all, although very randy in the morning with the hens! 😑 From what I read, it seemed as if many of the roosters that people were posting about showed few, if any, signs of being aggressive in the beginning. SO my question is, are their signs to look for for when/if a rooster is starting to become aggressive, or is it really so Jekyll and Hyde??? I love my guy, but he's a giant, and I'd love for him to stay my gentle giant, at least where I'm concerned! Thanks y'all! ❤️

post #2 of 10

After they hit one year, you can be pretty sure that whatever temperament they have then will stay the same. Before they hit "manhood" all you can really do is hope. In my experience, it's always the roo chicks that are the sweetest, but then they grow up to be jerks to either humans, hens, or both. We had an EE who was always a super sweet roo, but if we didn't have an older roo out their, he probably would have ended up accidentally killing a hen :/ Before him we had a RIR roo who was one of the favorites as a chick, but he grew up to be the meanest rooster I've ever seen. He'd come running from anywhere just to attack you, for no appearant reason. 

 

If he's a bigger guy, then there's a bigger chance he'll stay awesome. In my experience, large breeds are much more gentle (except in the morning! XD). Except for Fowler (EE above), he was gigantic and still a horrible roo. 

 

Good luck!

I love three things:                               

1. Jesus, my Lord and Saviour

2. My chickens (notably Peep)

And 3. Star wars (!!)

 

"People who count their chickens before they act very wisely, because

chickens run about so absurdly that it is impossible to count them acturatly!"

 

A really fun website:

http://patorjk.com/software/taag/#p=testall&h=1&v=2&c=bash&f=Crawford2...

Reply

I love three things:                               

1. Jesus, my Lord and Saviour

2. My chickens (notably Peep)

And 3. Star wars (!!)

 

"People who count their chickens before they act very wisely, because

chickens run about so absurdly that it is impossible to count them acturatly!"

 

A really fun website:

http://patorjk.com/software/taag/#p=testall&h=1&v=2&c=bash&f=Crawford2...

Reply
post #3 of 10
Thread Starter 
Thanks @PeepersMama, I hope this guy remains the same! He's about 8 months and has not shown any signs of aggression towards myself, my children, or the hens, although he is a little wary of my bull terrier mix which is with good reason as she has snapped at the hens a few times, but all he's done is crouch low, give her the "eye", and seemingly growls. ☺️ You've been very helpful!
post #4 of 10

Welcome! :highfive:

 

BTW, if he seems protective at this age, then I would keep him whether he gets a little "kick-ish" or not, especially if he threatens your dog. Good roosters are few and far between, and I'd keep a roo whod does his job and guards the hens, than a roo who is all about mating. 

 

Have fun!

I love three things:                               

1. Jesus, my Lord and Saviour

2. My chickens (notably Peep)

And 3. Star wars (!!)

 

"People who count their chickens before they act very wisely, because

chickens run about so absurdly that it is impossible to count them acturatly!"

 

A really fun website:

http://patorjk.com/software/taag/#p=testall&h=1&v=2&c=bash&f=Crawford2...

Reply

I love three things:                               

1. Jesus, my Lord and Saviour

2. My chickens (notably Peep)

And 3. Star wars (!!)

 

"People who count their chickens before they act very wisely, because

chickens run about so absurdly that it is impossible to count them acturatly!"

 

A really fun website:

http://patorjk.com/software/taag/#p=testall&h=1&v=2&c=bash&f=Crawford2...

Reply
post #5 of 10


I've posted about this in the "Managing your flock" thread, but of the four roosters I've had, the last three have been great due pretty much to the fact that I adopt a hands off approach with them and pay them no mind whatsoever when I am feeding the hens and collecting eggs.  They see me come out of the house and run up to me looking for food, but will willingly move out of my way and have no interest in my petting or touching them in any way.  I leave them alone and they leave me alone.  The two I have now are brothers and are half white leghorn and half polish.  Mutts, in other words, but their father was a huge bird and he was very non-aggressive with humans.

 

The first rooster I had was an Easter Egger and he was handled as a chick quite a bit.  He started trying to run me away from the pullets when he was about 12 weeks old.  My best day was when he was taken by a hawk.  He was a beautiful bird, but mean as a snake!  I love the two I have now.

Peeps61
Location: NW Florida
Chickens since Feb. 2013
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Peeps61
Location: NW Florida
Chickens since Feb. 2013
Reply
post #6 of 10
Thread Starter 
Good to know @Peeps61 as I've rarely handled my rooster. I'll admit to trying to pet my hens as I was quite envious of others who've said their hens sleep on their laps and/or perch on their shoulders (the most I've got was one to temporarily hop on my legs as I reclined back in my camping chair), but as a whole they're not interested in my love, just the food I bring! ☺️ My rooster hangs out around me, but never shows a real interest in me as do my hens! You guys have set my mind at ease! I don't need a pet rooster that whispers sweet nothings in my ear, but I don't want a real brute either! Merry Christmas! ❤️
post #7 of 10

:lol: If you want lap chickens, get brahmas, and handle them fequently as chicks. All of the brahmas I've ever had will come and sit on your lap, whether or not they are really "tame." Even my current brahma babies who were raised by a broody are super sweet - well, Peaches is, Cooties... depends on whether or not she's sitting on my lap! :lol:

I love three things:                               

1. Jesus, my Lord and Saviour

2. My chickens (notably Peep)

And 3. Star wars (!!)

 

"People who count their chickens before they act very wisely, because

chickens run about so absurdly that it is impossible to count them acturatly!"

 

A really fun website:

http://patorjk.com/software/taag/#p=testall&h=1&v=2&c=bash&f=Crawford2...

Reply

I love three things:                               

1. Jesus, my Lord and Saviour

2. My chickens (notably Peep)

And 3. Star wars (!!)

 

"People who count their chickens before they act very wisely, because

chickens run about so absurdly that it is impossible to count them acturatly!"

 

A really fun website:

http://patorjk.com/software/taag/#p=testall&h=1&v=2&c=bash&f=Crawford2...

Reply
post #8 of 10


I agree.  I have one brahma hen, and she is constantly under my feet when I am out with the flock.  She also "talks" to me quite a bit.  I can reach right down to pet her or pick her up if I want.  She's perfectly OK with either scenario and doesn't make a fuss that might alert the roosters.  Brahmas seem to have a calm, pleasing disposition for the most part.

Peeps61
Location: NW Florida
Chickens since Feb. 2013
Reply
Peeps61
Location: NW Florida
Chickens since Feb. 2013
Reply
post #9 of 10
Thread Starter 
Good to know! Thank y'all very much!
post #10 of 10

One year, I had a little broody raised cockrel that was an aggressive little dude.  It started at 2 weeks.  When I was tending Mama and her brood, he'd attack my hand.  If I was handling his siblings, he'd also attack.  Well, I immediately started dominance training with him, and within a week, he became a model citizen.  So... if training is started at the first sign of aggression, in some cases (but not all) I do believe it's possible to turn a cockrel around in his behavior.  Generally, as soon as I know that a chick is a male, I take a hands off approach with him, and do a bit of dominance training if warranted.

Ephesians 2:10  For we are his workmanship, created in Christ Jesus for good works, which God prepared beforehand, that we should walk in them.

 

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1013154/byc-member-interview-lazy-gardener

http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/yes-you-certainly-can-brood-chicks-outdoors

https://tikktok.wordpress.com/2014/04/13/fermented-feed-faq/

Reply

Ephesians 2:10  For we are his workmanship, created in Christ Jesus for good works, which God prepared beforehand, that we should walk in them.

 

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1013154/byc-member-interview-lazy-gardener

http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/yes-you-certainly-can-brood-chicks-outdoors

https://tikktok.wordpress.com/2014/04/13/fermented-feed-faq/

Reply
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