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Late bloomers?

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 
I bought 3 pullets the end of May. They were maybe 2 days old. It's December 16 and only 1 out of the 3 has started laying. Any ideas why the other 2 haven't started? I know it's winter and production slows but to not have at least laid 1 by this time seems strange.
post #2 of 6


Hi - the type of pullet you have may also be a factor.  What type of pullets are they?  I have three Easter Eggers I bought at the end of April and the were two days old also.  They've been laying for about 7 weeks now, and I live in NW Florida, so winter daylight hours apply here too.

 

Just a bit more information about your birds and your coop setup, etc. would be helpful.

Peeps61
Location: NW Florida
Chickens since Feb. 2013
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Peeps61
Location: NW Florida
Chickens since Feb. 2013
Reply
post #3 of 6

:welcome

 

What breeds are they?

 

You should see a boost in production here soon, after Solstice and the days start to lengthen. 

Rachel BB

Stem cell transplant from unrelated donor in Feb 2015. Thank you to all my friends here on BYC for all your support during my treatment and ongoing recovery!

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Rachel BB

Stem cell transplant from unrelated donor in Feb 2015. Thank you to all my friends here on BYC for all your support during my treatment and ongoing recovery!

Reply
post #4 of 6
Thread Starter 
The one laying is a cinnamon queen. The 2 that still haven't started are an Americauna and a silver laced Wyandotte. They're with a rooster and 3 other hens. They free range all day.
post #5 of 6

Do they look like they're laying? Plump red combs? If so, you might try confining them to the coop for a few days and see what you get. Free range often equals weird places to lay eggs.......

Rachel BB

Stem cell transplant from unrelated donor in Feb 2015. Thank you to all my friends here on BYC for all your support during my treatment and ongoing recovery!

Reply

Rachel BB

Stem cell transplant from unrelated donor in Feb 2015. Thank you to all my friends here on BYC for all your support during my treatment and ongoing recovery!

Reply
post #6 of 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by donrae View Post
 

Do they look like they're laying? Plump red combs? If so, you might try confining them to the coop for a few days and see what you get. Free range often equals weird places to lay eggs.......

Ditto Dat^^^

 

Tho Ameraucana(probably EE) and especially Wyandotte can be slower to come into lay......they could be laying in range area.

 

Time to check some butts, if you really want to know:

Vent Appearance:

Dry, tight, and smaller - usually not laying.

Moist, wide, and larger - usually laying.

 

Pelvic Points 2 bony points(pelvic bones) on either side of vent:

Less than 2 fingertip widths apart usually means not laying.

More than 2 fingertip widths apart usually means laying.

 

Then maybe lock em up for a time:

Free range birds sometimes need to be 'trained'(or re-trained) to lay in the coop nests, especially new layers. Leaving them locked in the coop for 3-4 days (or longer) can help 'home' them to lay in the coop nests.  Fake eggs/golf balls in the nests can help 'show' them were to lay. They can be confined to coop 24/7 for a few days to a week, or confine them at least until mid to late afternoon. You help them create a new habit and they will usually stick with it. ..at least for a good while, then repeat as necessary.

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

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Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
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