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Neglect Seems to be the Best Incubation Method

post #1 of 5
Thread Starter 

I just threw away 18 Sebright eggs that I carefully monitored, making sure they were turned at least five times a day, and always an odd number of turns. The humidity was right on till the very end, on day 18 I bumped it up to the recommended level, and I faithfully refilled the water reservoir whenever the humidity was even a few degrees too low. Nothing hatched. I ordered a barnyard mix off Ebay, set them after letting them settle over night. I had the incubator warmed up and the humidity was at the right level. Then I forgot about the after the first week and didn't turn them or look at the humidity, till I noticed it was Day 18 and time to lock down. I refilled the water reservoir, but I didn't think much would hatch. On day 20, 3 little Silkies hatched. The next day I had 3 Americauna, and 2 Leghorns. Now I've got another Americauna that just popped out on his own with no coaxing from me. There's one more egg left, a light tan colored one that looks like It could be an Australorp. Its pipping and peeping. Wow, neglect is really the answer! All chicks are well formed and vigorous. 

post #2 of 5

I have read that not turning can cause issues sometimes with development. I've hatched 3 hatches now where I only moved the eggs when I candle...so about 3 times in total by day 18. So far I haven't had issues with the chicks either.

 

My first two batches hatched with a decent hatching rate. They were fresher eggs. The last time I did it my eggs were old (I set old eggs...lol) and got 7. They're healthy so far.  I've been in my chicken house working for the day...and I haven't seen the broody hens turn their eggs very often

Integrity is doing the right thing even when no one is watching
- C.S. Lewis
Chickens are just like little kids; everything you do is interesting and they ALWAYS get in the way gig.gif

One day we will have a world where a chicken can cross the road without being questioned about their motives. smile.png
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Integrity is doing the right thing even when no one is watching
- C.S. Lewis
Chickens are just like little kids; everything you do is interesting and they ALWAYS get in the way gig.gif

One day we will have a world where a chicken can cross the road without being questioned about their motives. smile.png
Reply
post #3 of 5

I should add that there are a lot of factors involved in the success of hatching eggs; whether they're shipped, the place they originated from, the breed the egg is from. Were you 18 eggs shipped eggs?

 

The eggs I'm working with are from my own flock so the variables don't change much.

Integrity is doing the right thing even when no one is watching
- C.S. Lewis
Chickens are just like little kids; everything you do is interesting and they ALWAYS get in the way gig.gif

One day we will have a world where a chicken can cross the road without being questioned about their motives. smile.png
Reply
Integrity is doing the right thing even when no one is watching
- C.S. Lewis
Chickens are just like little kids; everything you do is interesting and they ALWAYS get in the way gig.gif

One day we will have a world where a chicken can cross the road without being questioned about their motives. smile.png
Reply
post #4 of 5
Quote:
Originally Posted by RainForestBird View Post
 

I just threw away 18 Sebright eggs that I carefully monitored, making sure they were turned at least five times a day, and always an odd number of turns. The humidity was right on till the very end, on day 18 I bumped it up to the recommended level, and I faithfully refilled the water reservoir whenever the humidity was even a few degrees too low. Nothing hatched. I ordered a barnyard mix off Ebay, set them after letting them settle over night. I had the incubator warmed up and the humidity was at the right level. Then I forgot about the after the first week and didn't turn them or look at the humidity, till I noticed it was Day 18 and time to lock down. I refilled the water reservoir, but I didn't think much would hatch. On day 20, 3 little Silkies hatched. The next day I had 3 Americauna, and 2 Leghorns. Now I've got another Americauna that just popped out on his own with no coaxing from me. There's one more egg left, a light tan colored one that looks like It could be an Australorp. Its pipping and peeping. Wow, neglect is really the answer! All chicks are well formed and vigorous. 

When a hen moves one egg she moves all her eggs.  Often she only lifts her feet then puts them down again and this simple movement spreads out like a wave on the ocean.  

Keep your chickens safe from predators, buy and wear fur. 
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Keep your chickens safe from predators, buy and wear fur. 
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post #5 of 5
I would say it's the source of the eggs and shipping conditions, not your care that caused the difference in hatch rates.
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