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Sudden Death of Chicken

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
This morning I found my previously healthy RI red curled up in a corner of the coop- she refused to eat, drink, or even stand. She appeared to be breathing a bit heavy.
I thought this was al due to last night being the first to reach beow zero.
I placed fresh hay all around her and gave placed food and water right next to her. In the afternoon It appeared she hadn't moved, but she was a bit more responsive to me. I wrapped her in a towel and brought her into the basement out of the cold. I gave her a bit of water through a syringe and got her comfy on fresh hay and the towel. Two hours later (after researching) I went to check her vent again and to apply some lubricant in case she was egg bound. While doing this she started to seize and then ultimately died in my arms.
Does anyone have insight as to what this was and what I should do if any of my other hens display similar symptoms.
Thank you!
post #2 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by reils500 View Post

This morning I found my previously healthy RI red curled up in a corner of the coop- she refused to eat, drink, or even stand. She appeared to be breathing a bit heavy.
I thought this was al due to last night being the first to reach beow zero.
I placed fresh hay all around her and gave placed food and water right next to her. In the afternoon It appeared she hadn't moved, but she was a bit more responsive to me. I wrapped her in a towel and brought her into the basement out of the cold. I gave her a bit of water through a syringe and got her comfy on fresh hay and the towel. Two hours later (after researching) I went to check her vent again and to apply some lubricant in case she was egg bound. While doing this she started to seize and then ultimately died in my arms.
Does anyone have insight as to what this was and what I should do if any of my other hens display similar symptoms.
Thank you!

Sorry the Bird died......Always sad...

 

 

Nutrition......Balanced nutrition is needed......Chickens will die at times of stress if they are not healthy.......

 

I will help you, if you would like me too?

 

 

Cheers!

Bouncers Mom..........Quack!
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Bouncers Mom..........Quack!
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post #3 of 10
Thread Starter 
I'm just shocked because she appeared healthy the day before. She was good size, biggest in the flock, red comb, and shiny feathers.
I feed my hens layer feed as their primary diet. I throw a bit of scratch in the run every morning and they get occasional veggie/bread scraps.
post #4 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by reils500 View Post

I'm just shocked because she appeared healthy the day before. She was good size, biggest in the flock, red comb, and shiny feathers.
I feed my hens layer feed as their primary diet. I throw a bit of scratch in the run every morning and they get occasional veggie/bread scraps.


Biggest in the flock meaning fat? Obesity is very common in chickens and is a silent killer.

Five Red Junglefowl,Ten Easter Eggers,Two African Geese,Three Fawn and White Runners and Four Rouen's.
 
 
~Isaac 
 
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Five Red Junglefowl,Ten Easter Eggers,Two African Geese,Three Fawn and White Runners and Four Rouen's.
 
 
~Isaac 
 
Reply
post #5 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by MasterOfClucker View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by reils500 View Post

I'm just shocked because she appeared healthy the day before. She was good size, biggest in the flock, red comb, and shiny feathers.
I feed my hens layer feed as their primary diet. I throw a bit of scratch in the run every morning and they get occasional veggie/bread scraps.


Biggest in the flock meaning fat? Obesity is very common in chickens and is a silent killer.

Also bread can kill Chickens.......No more bread for Chickens......

 

 

 

 

Cheers!

Bouncers Mom..........Quack!
Reply
Bouncers Mom..........Quack!
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post #6 of 10
Thread Starter 


Thank you for your input. I wouldn't call her fat.
No more bread for my girls.
Would a nutritional issue cause such a sudden death?
I'm still concerned she had a virus of some sort. Luckily the rest of the flock seems normal today.
post #7 of 10

How much space to you have for them?Yes,Obesity will kill them if you still have her you can feel her breast bone,If its squishy and large she is fat.

Five Red Junglefowl,Ten Easter Eggers,Two African Geese,Three Fawn and White Runners and Four Rouen's.
 
 
~Isaac 
 
Reply
Five Red Junglefowl,Ten Easter Eggers,Two African Geese,Three Fawn and White Runners and Four Rouen's.
 
 
~Isaac 
 
Reply
post #8 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by reils500 View Post

This morning I found my previously healthy RI red curled up in a corner of the coop- she refused to eat, drink, or even stand. She appeared to be breathing a bit heavy.
I thought this was al due to last night being the first to reach beow zero.
I placed fresh hay all around her and gave placed food and water right next to her. In the afternoon It appeared she hadn't moved, but she was a bit more responsive to me. I wrapped her in a towel and brought her into the basement out of the cold. I gave her a bit of water through a syringe and got her comfy on fresh hay and the towel. Two hours later (after researching) I went to check her vent again and to apply some lubricant in case she was egg bound. While doing this she started to seize and then ultimately died in my arms.
Does anyone have insight as to what this was and what I should do if any of my other hens display similar symptoms.
Thank you!

I'm sorry for your loss.

 

It's hard to determine cause of death without a necrospy.  If you still have her, you may want to consider sending her in for examination. This will give you the information you need in order to determine whether it was caused by nutrition, an internal laying/reproductive disorder, disease or something else. 

 

Here are the lists of state labs:

http://www.metzerfarms.com/PoultryLabs.cfm
http://www.usaha.org/Portals/6/StateAnimalHealthOfficials.pdf

 

 

 

post #9 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by reils500 View Post



Thank you for your input. I wouldn't call her fat.
No more bread for my girls.
Would a nutritional issue cause such a sudden death?
I'm still concerned she had a virus of some sort. Luckily the rest of the flock seems normal today.

Yes......Not to make you feel worse.....Nutrition is totally important to chickens......All the scraps/treat/ snacks kill Birds all the time....Only feed the age appropriate feed, fresh water and the grit/oyster shell in a separate bowl........

 

 

 

Cheers!

Bouncers Mom..........Quack!
Reply
Bouncers Mom..........Quack!
Reply
post #10 of 10
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MasterOfClucker View Post

How much space to you have for them?Yes,Obesity will kill them if you still have her you can feel her breast bone,If its squishy and large she is fat.
I could feel her breast bone, thank you for that tip.
I have a large coop for 9 hens (about 45 square feet) with a large, attached outdoor run. M
I also let them have free reign of the yard at times too.
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