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Odd behavior

post #1 of 25
Thread Starter 
I have a hen who was hatched in early June of this year. Recently she was showing signs of illness and I promptly took action to isolate her and with my knowledge of natural remedies, I gave her feed and put some crushed raw garlic in some water for her. After about four days she seemed fine, although she is quite skinny. She is living with the rest of the flock again, but still is acting a bit strange. They have sufficient amounts of food and water, and I am occasionally adding garlic to their food and water (one or two "treatments" per week). She is active, eats and drinks, but still feels skinny and I will catch her napping all puffed up in the middle of the yard sometimes. I also have to physically put her on the roost at night or else she will just sleep on the floor of the coop. None of the other hens are acting strange either. Her father is a banty and her mother is a standard size RIR. I suspect her puffiness and sleeping on the floor where there straw bedding is because of the cold snap we are having here in Western Washington, it's been no higher than about 30 degrees for weeks, and she's so tiny because of her banty genetics. I would appreciate some advice, but as a forewarning, I will not take her to see a vet nor will I spend a bunch of money. I love my birds but they are only livestock, not considered pets at my household.
post #2 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by mpmb1227 View Post

I have a hen who was hatched in early June of this year. Recently she was showing signs of illness and I promptly took action to isolate her and with my knowledge of natural remedies, I gave her feed and put some crushed raw garlic in some water for her. After about four days she seemed fine, although she is quite skinny. She is living with the rest of the flock again, but still is acting a bit strange. They have sufficient amounts of food and water, and I am occasionally adding garlic to their food and water (one or two "treatments" per week). She is active, eats and drinks, but still feels skinny and I will catch her napping all puffed up in the middle of the yard sometimes. I also have to physically put her on the roost at night or else she will just sleep on the floor of the coop. None of the other hens are acting strange either. Her father is a banty and her mother is a standard size RIR. I suspect her puffiness and sleeping on the floor where there straw bedding is because of the cold snap we are having here in Western Washington, it's been no higher than about 30 degrees for weeks, and she's so tiny because of her banty genetics. I would appreciate some advice, but as a forewarning, I will not take her to see a vet nor will I spend a bunch of money. I love my birds but they are only livestock, not considered pets at my household.

I totally agree they are Chickens.....

 

Anyways........What do you feed the birds.......I mean daily and treats included...........?

 

Cut out the garlic.......Not needed or good....

 

 

 

Cheers!

Bouncers Mom..........Quack!
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Bouncers Mom..........Quack!
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post #3 of 25
Thread Starter 
They get a steady diet of mixed flock pellets, I am about to switch them back to layer pellets. I have some that are a few years and some that are barely old enough to lay, which is why I have been using mixed flock. Not to argue but I've spoken personally with herbalists and researched the use of garlic, they've recommended occasional use due to the antibiotic properties it contains when freshly crushed. I only use it for about 2 or 3 weeks once a year in the winter, about how often I have a concern for one of them. They don't get a lot of treats but I've been throwin apples to them which I picked from an organic farm up the street. They free range for most of the day at least 3 or 4 days a week as well, so they forage what they can find this time of year. One other thing, she's usually lettig her wings droop over her thighs and her tail is more or less straight out behind her rathee than perked up.
post #4 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by mpmb1227 View Post

They get a steady diet of mixed flock pellets, I am about to switch them back to layer pellets. I have some that are a few years and some that are barely old enough to lay, which is why I have been using mixed flock. Not to argue but I've spoken personally with herbalists and researched the use of garlic, they've recommended occasional use due to the antibiotic properties it contains when freshly crushed. I only use it for about 2 or 3 weeks once a year in the winter, about how often I have a concern for one of them. They don't get a lot of treats but I've been throwin apples to them which I picked from an organic farm up the street. They free range for most of the day at least 3 or 4 days a week as well, so they forage what they can find this time of year. One other thing, she's usually lettig her wings droop over her thighs and her tail is more or less straight out behind her rathee than perked up.

Okay ........I tried to help.....Hopefully other pipe in soon...

 

 

Good luck.

 

 

Cheers!

Bouncers Mom..........Quack!
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Bouncers Mom..........Quack!
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post #5 of 25
Thread Starter 
Just out of curiosity, what have you heard about garlic for chickens? I feel pretty confident in what I've been told but it's important to hear what others have to say about it. Thansks, by the way!
post #6 of 25

Dont believe everything you read on the internet......Not much value to a Chicken as many of the other hyped up things people push.....Anyways......

 

 

Good luck with the Birds...

 

Cheers!

Bouncers Mom..........Quack!
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Bouncers Mom..........Quack!
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post #7 of 25

Howdy mpmb1227

 

First up, I am definitely not an expert on what ails chickens but I am trying to educate myself and learning a little each day.

 

Has she started laying yet?

 

I ask because some of her symptoms sound like a laying issue, may be egg yolk peritonitis?  I lost a hen to EYP and she had similar symptoms.  She would be unwell so antibiotics were given which would treat the infection; she would be OK for a while but then we would go through it again. Her laying plumbing was all messed up.

 

http://www.theveterinaryexpert.com/backyard-poultry/egg-yolk-peritonitis/

Bambrook Bantams; Home to Cilla, Dusty, LuLu, Blondie and Crystal

 

'There is No snooze button on a chicken who wants breakfast'

 

'Until One Has Loved An Animal, Part Of Their Soul Remains Unawakened'

 

My Chicken Page: http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/bambrook-bantams

 

Teila's Tales from the Coop: http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1109051/teilas-tales-from-the-coop

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Bambrook Bantams; Home to Cilla, Dusty, LuLu, Blondie and Crystal

 

'There is No snooze button on a chicken who wants breakfast'

 

'Until One Has Loved An Animal, Part Of Their Soul Remains Unawakened'

 

My Chicken Page: http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/bambrook-bantams

 

Teila's Tales from the Coop: http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1109051/teilas-tales-from-the-coop

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post #8 of 25

Ive heard too much garlic is bad.Is she on the top of the pecking order?She could be getting bullied from the food dish and not getting enough nutrition.

Five Red Junglefowl,Ten Easter Eggers,Two African Geese,Three Fawn and White Runners and Four Rouen's.
 
 
~Isaac 
 
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Five Red Junglefowl,Ten Easter Eggers,Two African Geese,Three Fawn and White Runners and Four Rouen's.
 
 
~Isaac 
 
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post #9 of 25

Healthy Birds fed a balanced diet that is 100% nutritional do not get sick.............All I will say......

 

 

Cheers!

Bouncers Mom..........Quack!
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Bouncers Mom..........Quack!
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post #10 of 25
Thread Starter 
She's yet to lay any eggs. She is just about the right age to start though. What I know about the garlic not being good is related to how much is given and how it is given, but here's my take on it. We as humans take medications that will help us get healthier or to fight diseases/infections, but most meds are not necessarily good for us (ahem... Antibiotics...). Garlic could very well be thought of in the same way. Only in large amounts and too frequent of use it will be harmful, and honestly it is very difficult to find it on a list of plants that are toxic to livestock. So if there are properties that are beneficial but it MIGHT cause problems in the short term, there is no difference between giving it to a hen and people ingesting antibiotics. She is the only banty hen, it's possible she is not able to eat enough but based on observation it seems that she is getting enough food. She often goes in to eat when they are free ranging and of course nobody is around to stop her. It's true that healthy birds with a nutritious diet are less likely to get ill, but that does not mean they can't get ill. Again, comparing to other animals (including people), you can have a perfect diet and be in great shape, but still succumb to disease and illness. It mostly relates to genetics, environment, and immune function.
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