New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

3D Modeling for Coops (& appliances) - Page 11

post #101 of 127
Thread Starter 

The model is online now, available here:

 

https://3dwarehouse.sketchup.com/model/1ce857af-2ce5-4b5e-a666-114af87670ef/Woods-Mini-Coop

post #102 of 127
Sweet I am putting baton on the hen house right now but once it gets dark I'll get it on my laptop

Scott
Edited by ScottandSam - 3/20/17 at 2:51pm
post #103 of 127
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ScottandSam View Post
 

Ok thanks howard I'll get to that video in a bit.

 

 

I thing I didn't see Nesting boxes? I saw on Howards design the in what I'd call the back. Does sketch have the listed so the builds complete?

 

 

Scott

 

There are nesting boxes in the model. Sort of tacked on to the back of the coop - not well designed, but there. In the model, they're just a bunch of plywood pieces butted together and nailed, with 2x material nailed around to secure them to the coop with. You may (I would) choose to come up with a better design for them. Right now, what's there is occupying the right amount of space for the coop design.

post #104 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by ScottandSam View Post
 

so whats thoughts on the woods design with wall finished off inside. that would be outside the design. a if want to.

 

Scott

I would skip it, it's not necessary and only adds weight and makes places for rodents and insects to take up housekeeping unseen.

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #105 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by aart View Post
 

I would skip it, it's not necessary and only adds weight and makes places for rodents and insects to take up housekeeping unseen.

Thank you.

 

Scott

post #106 of 127

I actually just installed sketchup, mostly because it's less resource hogging than my usual programs (Maya and Zbrush) and is also simpler to teach my husband for doing things of this caliber. We'll see how much patience I have with it though, since i'm not familiar with the program itself and some programs are just a pain to adjust too when you're use to something else, but i've heard that it's a lot simpler with far less options and less of a learning curve than either of the programs I learned modelling on. 

Mostly did it because for the life of me i can't translate what my husband tries to put on paper, particular mathematically. He doesn't account for the width of boards and so many other little factors and then it just gets frustrating all around when trying to design things, lol. 

post #107 of 127
I just discovered the woods style while researching for a larger coop. I'm also interested to see how a mini would work. Wish I had seen this about 4 weeks ago. I just finished a 4x8, normal shed style coop to house some pullets and later maybe serve as a bachelor pad.

Sketch up is the best. I used it to draw plans for my house!
Thank you Wesleybeal for the work on the model.

I also would suggest using 1/2 or even 3/8 ply wood, especially if you are planning to side over it. It would save cost and weight. And probably frame the inside with 2x2. Something this size doesn't need much to stay solid. If you stay with 3/4 and cut it strait, like with a table saw, I bet you could glue and screw a lot of it with no framing at all.

Another idea would be to use Baltic birch plywood. It is extremely stable so it doesn't tend to warp or bow at all. It also comes in 5x5 sheets and could be used for the uncommon 5 foot widths. Commonly used on homebuilt teardrop trailers. I priced it a while back at the local lumber yard and it wasn't too pricy at all.

Just ideas. I encourage someone to try it.
Im going to build an 8x14 cause I need something larger. But after some other projects there might just be enough scraps around this fall to make a mini.
post #108 of 127

I was just looking at t11 siding at lowes  It in wood it looks to be .59" thick 4x8 and in the other primed stuff it lower like .390 thick. In my area wood/ply is cheaper than the primed ply .I think their both reverse board and baton looking.

 

 I would stay the 3/4" on the floor if it pt then I would paint it.  Maybe figure a gallon to paint the whole inside.

 

Scott

post #109 of 127
Another slight savings and less waste would be to use the wood cut away for the door as the door. Use the 1x4 or 1x3 to trim it.
post #110 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by ScottandSam View Post
 

I was just looking at t11 siding at lowes  It in wood it looks to be .59" thick 4x8 and in the other primed stuff it lower like .390 thick. In my area wood/ply is cheaper than the primed ply .I think their both reverse board and baton looking.

 

 I would stay the 3/4" on the floor if it pt then I would paint it.  Maybe figure a gallon to paint the whole inside.

 

Scott

 

Nothing is ever easy. The T1-11 siding is rougher in appearance, but is more or less 5/8" plywood, with groves cut in it to resemble batten board siding, plus the edges are notched to overlap at the seams. But since this is 5/8" plywood, it is structural. The 3/8" smart siding stuff makes for good siding, but needs to be installed over something else.......like insulation board, OSB, plywood, etc. It is a good siding product, but is not structural like the T1-11 is. But in either case, the seams would run horizontal and not vertical, so I would not use either for this.

 

My thought was to build the Woods Mini from 1/2" plywood only and if decoration was needed, nail on some vertical battens to make it resemble batten board. You should be able to get each side from a single 4' x 8' sheet of 1/2 plywood, with scrap left over for the fronts and maybe to use for parts like nesting boxes, etc.

 

I'd also use a single sheet of 3/4" treated plywood for the floor........or perhaps stick with 1/2 plywood and paint it with Blackjack or use floor vinyl?

 

Also, if you make the thing 45" wide, that allows you to use a single sheet of plywood for both roof components, with 1.5" overhang on each side......enough for roof edging and some trim below.

 

As for framing material, they used to make a size of lumber called a 2" x 3", which is a 1.5" x 2.5" size. Not nearly as heavy or cumbersome as a 2 x 4, but stronger structurally than a 2 x 2. If you could find it, it would be ideal for this project. *

 

* Reminds me of a lot of nice food recipes that have simple ingredients, except for one...........that one will be something like "eye of newt" or "extract of powder"..........something nobody has ever heard of and is impossible to find.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav: