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3D Modeling for Coops (& appliances) - Page 3

post #21 of 126
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by WesleyBeal View Post


Yeah, there are human/animal models. Haven't specifically looked at the chicken models, just know I've seen them.

I can grab screenshots. Will try to remember to do that next time I'm at my desk.

 

Here's a snip of a model in SketchUp using a person, and a chicken to give a sense of size....

 

 

I'm trying to remember what else I said I was going to do, before going on vacation. If there are other requests, let me know.

post #22 of 126

That looks great.....love real size and shape 'scalers' in a model/drawing.

And there it clearly shows that the coop is way too small ...maybe even for even one bird.

 

Not sure what you said you were going to do...... :)

....thought this thread was trying to get people to model their coops in SU.

 

Hope you had a great vaca!

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #23 of 126

Does look good. How hard is it to add some dimensions to this? For buildable plans, sooner or later you need some dimensions so you can measure twice, then cut once.

post #24 of 126
Quote:
Originally Posted by Howard E View Post
 

Does look good. How hard is it to add some dimensions to this? For buildable plans, sooner or later you need some dimensions so you can measure twice, then cut once.

Yes, always good to see a few dimensions....

...even on screen shots of in process models!!


Edited by aart - 1/3/17 at 10:40am

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #25 of 126
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by aart View Post
 

Yes, always good to see a few dimensions....

...even on screen shots of in process models!!

 

Dimensions are pretty easy - there's a tool: you select the tool, then select along the object you're interested in for the dimensions you want.

 

Does this look familiar? It's not exact - I'm making some guesses from the image provided, getting things roughly put together...

 

post #26 of 126
Quote:
Originally Posted by WesleyBeal View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by aart View Post
 

Yes, always good to see a few dimensions....

...even on screen shots of in process models!!

 

Dimensions are pretty easy - there's a tool: you select the tool, then select along the object you're interested in for the dimensions you want.

 

Does this look familiar? It's not exact - I'm making some guesses from the image provided, getting things roughly put together...

 

Looks pretty good to me.

Can you adjust the size of pieces by changing the dimension number?

Like, say you wanted to make it 36 instead of 24 high off the ground?

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #27 of 126
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by aart View Post
 

Looks pretty good to me.

Can you adjust the size of pieces by changing the dimension number?

Like, say you wanted to make it 36 instead of 24 high off the ground?

 

Nope. There may be a way to do that same sort of thing without actually editing the object, but I'm not good enough to know how. There's a tool named "Scale" that resizes some things - haven't used it yet and figured out what all it would allow. On first glance, it looks like it will let me resize an object, but I haven't seen how this is more convenient that resizing an object the "usual" way.

post #28 of 126
Quote:
Originally Posted by WesleyBeal View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by aart View Post
 

Looks pretty good to me.

Can you adjust the size of pieces by changing the dimension number?

Like, say you wanted to make it 36 instead of 24 high off the ground?

 

Nope. There may be a way to do that same sort of thing without actually editing the object, but I'm not good enough to know how. There's a tool named "Scale" that resizes some things - haven't used it yet and figured out what all it would allow. On first glance, it looks like it will let me resize an object, but I haven't seen how this is more convenient that resizing an object the "usual" way.

Some programs have the model component 'tied' to the dimensions...so you can edit the dimensions to change the model component.

Parametric modeling works this way and is the bomb.....gotta build the model components in a good 'order' to work well tho, can take some trial and error

Some you can edit the component but may have to re-dimension.

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #29 of 126
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Howard E View Post
 

I gave Sketchup a try, got frustrated and went back to graph paper and a different sketching program I know, Canvas. Except my version of Canvas had expired, so will need to upgrade to keep using it.

 

How hard is it to sketch up something like my Woods mini?

 

 

 

What I ran into trouble with was with the dimensions, plus dragging and dropping and moving things around. I don't remember is Sketchup has scaled grids (digital graph paper), but would help me if it did.

 

Here's an attempt at this Woods Mini coop. I haven't included dimensions in the screenshots, as 1, they get a bit messy to look at among everything else, and 2, the dimensions I interpreted from this drawing just don't feel right, so I'm attempting to stop myself from putting more time into it. As modeled, the coop is 4' high at it's tallest point. I made it a square (6' 6" x 6' 6"). That leaves this coop an awkward size, it seems to me, to work with, as it's too short to get inside of, and too wide to reach across.

 

One thing these screenshots don't portray, which I find to be about the most helpful thing in a 3D model, is the ability to move the parts around, hide some things (like walls) so you can see inside, etc.

 

Another thing I was going to show, but decided it didn't really come through on a screenshot, was how you can examine the angle the sun hits the coop at, and where the sun hits inside the coop, at different times of day on different days of the year. That is something that I think is truly useful when designing these coops, given how much of the design is directed at how cool or warm the coop is at different times of the year.

 

Anyway, here's the screenshots:

 

Front view:

 

 

Iso view:

 

 

Left view:

 

 

"X-Ray" Iso view:

 

post #30 of 126

That looks really good (sketch that is). I started out trying for something similar and quickly threw in the towel and reached for the graph paper. Your efforts show it is entirely possible.

 

You are correct about the awkward size as drawn. To conform with the Woods coop dimensions, to achieve the dead air space in the back at the roost level, the enclosed coop area needs to be narrower. I never showed the front elevation, but I'd make it 45 inches wide, to allow a person to use a single sheet of plywood for the roof. At 45 inches, it allows for 3 inches of overhang on the sides or 1 1/2 inches per side to allow for trim boards. The coop overall can be left as 6 1/2' x 6 1/2', with the side to left when facing it from the front left as open sided screened in run. Pop door as shown allowing entry to it. Water and feed in the run. Put an entry door into the run on the end of the screened in area. Entire area of run and area beneath the coop screened in and available as run. Leave the roof lines as is. I would only want to have two windows.

 

Or simply narrow it up and skip the run entirely. Again, this is only intended to be a compact, backyard house for about 4 birds. Enough birds for a dozen eggs a week. Same purpose as the dinky death traps a lot of folks get tricked into buying, but actually suitable for 3 or 4 birds. As such, the run would be a nice addition, but not essential.

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