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Chicken is Limping

post #1 of 53
Thread Starter 

When i went to take care of the chickens this morning i noticed Silver Steps ( weird name ki know lol) was limping out of the coop. i think it might just be one leg but now it seems like she can't even get up on her other leg :(

i moved her to the stall (we used to have goats) and now she can hardly get up, i did put a towel around her to keep her warm ( i did that right before she left) i'm not sure if it was a good idea or not. She doesn't have a poopy butt, she did take a few bites of bread before i moved her to the stall. i checked her feet they do look like their starting to get blue, could it be frostbite? its really cold here up north. she's a little old but not too old..?? i fear she might end up like her friend speckles (dead) speckles and her were always close :( 

any idea what could be the problem?

post #2 of 53
Thread Starter 
Can someone help? Please?
post #3 of 53

Bluish spots usually means bruising.Are the perches high up?Do they have a hard time jumping off?


Edited by MasterOfClucker - 1/3/17 at 6:42am
 
 
The key to everything is patience.You get the chicken by hatching the egg,not by smashing it.

 

 

 

 

-Isaac

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The key to everything is patience.You get the chicken by hatching the egg,not by smashing it.

 

 

 

 

-Isaac

Reply
post #4 of 53
Did she have any scabs on the bottom of her feet? Are her waddles or comb turning blue or purple?
post #5 of 53

It could be a number of things.  You should definately take her to the vet if you want her to live.  If you need help finding a good vet, let me know. I would recommend these guys- http://www.newildlife.org/odd-pet-ve/, but if there's somewhere else that you would rather go, you could go there instead.

post #6 of 53

I would also recommend this book- https://www.amazon.com/Chicken-Health-Handbook-Gail-Damerow/dp/0882666118. It really helps whenever my chickens are sick or injured.

post #7 of 53
Thread Starter 


Her comb is normal (sorry no pic of her feet, I took this pic before I made the thread, this was this morning)
I would like to get new roost in the spring, right now we use wooden dowels, what do you guys use?
I'll take a pic of her feet later today after school, thanks
post #8 of 53

Sometime today give her a warm bath(Just her feet).

 
 
The key to everything is patience.You get the chicken by hatching the egg,not by smashing it.

 

 

 

 

-Isaac

Reply
 
 
The key to everything is patience.You get the chicken by hatching the egg,not by smashing it.

 

 

 

 

-Isaac

Reply
post #9 of 53

Hi

 

Firstly I would put her in a cardboard box and bring her in the house where it is warm. Once she has acclimatised to the warmth (a few hours) I would give her feet a soak in warm Epsom salts and examine them thoroughly for any signs of scabs that would indicate bumblefoot. I would also offer her warm water with a vitamin supplement and warm moist food like scrambled eggs or a mash made with her regular food soaked in warm water. If no sign of bumblefoot scabs/swelling, then examine her legs for any injury or swelling. How old is not too old? Has she ever been lame like this before and recovered? I'm thinking this might possibly be Marek's disease or Lymphoid Leucosis. If she is a silkie, it may also be a peck to the head that has caused damage to the brain resulting loss of control of limbs, or as others have said, a simple injury. Either way, she will need to be kept warm and have safe access to food and water. Be aware that if she is left somewhere that rats can get access, they could eat her alive, so please make sure she is somewhere safe. It might be helpful to make her a chicken hammock or sling to support her in an upright position if she is struggling to stand. This would be particularly useful if she has a break of strain as it will support her whilst it heals. It can be made from an old Tshirt placed over a suitably sized cardboard box with the open end upwards and holes cut in the fabric for her legs to fit through, so that she is suspended in the box. It may be necessary to gather and staple the fabric to the sides of the box to get the tension right so that she is supported off the bottom. Then cut a hole ender her vent so that poop can drop through and place a tray with some litter below to catch it. Yoghurt pots containing food and water can also be inserted into slots in the fabric in front of her.   

 

Regards

 

Barbara 

 

Edited to say, disregard possible Silkie brain damage comment as photo now posted indicates that she isn't one 


Edited by rebrascora - 1/3/17 at 7:12am
post #10 of 53
Thread Starter 
Due to me still living with my family, I doubt they would let me bring 'a chicken' (I love my chickens, but my family just likes them for the eggs, I do too but they are kinda like pets too me) in the house, but maybe I could in the basement. We do have epsom salt, I can clean them in a plastic tub. Here is her feet/legs, I'll inspect them more once I start cleaning them. ( thanks Barbara and everyone else, greatly appreciated!!)
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