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Pecking Problem - Page 2

post #11 of 19
It might keep them more busy. From my experiences hens are mentally happier with a good rooster, and a rooster will normally try to keep his hens in line. Of course there are good and bad roosters too.
Chickens, muscovy ducks, turkeys, donkeys , goats, dogs, fish, parakeets, a parrot, and a cat.

Chickens and dogs are healing to the soul.

I brake for squirrels.

Some of my birds.
http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/my-wisconsin-flock
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Chickens, muscovy ducks, turkeys, donkeys , goats, dogs, fish, parakeets, a parrot, and a cat.

Chickens and dogs are healing to the soul.

I brake for squirrels.

Some of my birds.
http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/my-wisconsin-flock
Reply
post #12 of 19
Thread Starter 
okay. we were thinking about getting a buff orpington rooster because we've heard they're very docile
post #13 of 19

'Good' or 'bad' demeanor's in cockbirds cannot be determined by breed alone.

There are individual lines of breeds and also individual birds.

The keepers demeanor is equally important in how a bird will behave.

Not convinced a cockbird will prevent these pecking issues you have,

and keeping males adds a whole other set of issues and learning curves.

 

Getting whole new flock may result in better results...or not.

I just wonder why they were behaving this way in the first place?

I'm guessing crowding and/or inadequate nutrition.

 

What are the 'leaves' you were feeding?

Don't think you ever answered that question, but maybe I missed it.

 

What was the breed?

Don't think you ever answered that question, but maybe I missed it.

 

Also pics of your coop interior might help.


Edited by aart - 1/9/17 at 5:32am

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

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Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #14 of 19

I will chime in here with some different ideas than the ones already mentioned. Birds often peck to establish the pecking order. Now usually just a threat of a peck, and the lower bird will leave the dominant bird, and get out of sight. Think of it as curtseying to the queen. I have seen the lower bird, leave, get out of sight, and within seconds come back stand right beside the queen and eat. It is the getting out of sight that signals that both birds agree.

 

If you have a big flat wide open run, there is NO place to get out of sight. So even if the lower bird moves off, she does not get out of sight, and to an aggressive bird, this can raise a red flag. It is like the lower the bird is refusing to agree with it. And often times the more aggressive bird attacks again to prove the point.

 

So if you add a couple of hideouts, it can really help. A pallet up on saw horses, so birds can get under or on top of it. A pallet leaned up against a wall, or even a small wall standing up in the middle of the run. These are good places to set up some extra feed stations where a lower bird can eat without drawing the attention of other birds.

 

Mrs K

Western South Dakota Rancher
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Western South Dakota Rancher
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post #15 of 19
Thread Starter 
Juggler we don't feed them the leaves we just put them in the run for them to scratch in. We had 2 Rhode Island reds, 2 isa Browns, 2barred rocks, an EE, a buff Orpington, white leghorn, and a black austrolorp. We now have the leghorn and EE and 1 barred rock and is a brown.

Mrs. K a fiend told us putting some milk crates in could add protection so we did and they do sit in and on the sometimes.
post #16 of 19
Neat read on feather picking.

http://m.ps.oxfordjournals.org/content/90/6/1145.full
Edited by TalkALittle - 1/11/17 at 8:04am
post #17 of 19
Thread Starter 
Hey everyone. Last night we were looking at the pecked Easter egger, nugget, and she has some blood around the vent. I also noticed another hen pecking her in the run today. I don't know if the protein hasn't kicked in yet or the cold weathers stressing them or what to do. Any advice at this point? I don't want to kill the four remainders but we're almost at that point. we've tried everything.
post #18 of 19
Have you've tried feeding them stuff like canned fish, cottage cheese, or scrambled eggs to get some quick protein in them?
Chickens, muscovy ducks, turkeys, donkeys , goats, dogs, fish, parakeets, a parrot, and a cat.

Chickens and dogs are healing to the soul.

I brake for squirrels.

Some of my birds.
http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/my-wisconsin-flock
Reply
Chickens, muscovy ducks, turkeys, donkeys , goats, dogs, fish, parakeets, a parrot, and a cat.

Chickens and dogs are healing to the soul.

I brake for squirrels.

Some of my birds.
http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/my-wisconsin-flock
Reply
post #19 of 19
Thread Starter 
we've tried cat food. similar to the canned fish
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