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How much time - Page 2

post #11 of 16
We have 6 chickens and spend on average about 15 minutes a day caring for them. Twice a year we do a complete coop clean-out, once a year a complete run clean-out which takes several hours.
2 Buff Orpingtons, 4 Black Sex Links,. 1 Golden Retriever, 1 "old man" cat and 2 Betta.
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2 Buff Orpingtons, 4 Black Sex Links,. 1 Golden Retriever, 1 "old man" cat and 2 Betta.
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post #12 of 16

I spend probably 5 minutes in the morning, 2 at night, and 10 minutes throughout the day just checking on them or putting them back in the run or telling them to stop pecking on my office door. 

 

And every Saturday I spend about 15 minutes cleaning out the coop, composting their crap, putting down fresh straw. 

 

Overall very, very easy! 

post #13 of 16
Thread Starter 


I am beginning to understand that chickens are very self sufficient. I would of thought that they were going to be very needy but not at all. They seem to entertain themselves very well in a course of a day. Also, I have realized that they are smarter than I gave them credit for when we decided to get them. Show them something one or two times and they got it and they are only 9 weeks old. If I would have know this before I would have had chickens way before this.

  When I started this thread I guessed I  spent about 30 minutes a day tending to them. In the last couple of day I have actually timed the time I spend and it turns out only about 10 minutes a day and most of that is cleaning out the coop every morning.  If only my dogs and cat were that easy.

post #14 of 16
I gather eggs once per day, takes about a minute.

Once per week I fill food and water containers which will last for 3 weeks minimum, takes about 10 minutes.

About once per year, I replace the deep bedding, takes about a half hour.

That is about all the necessary time needed.

I have about a dozen birds.

That said, I spend way more time with them as most would enjoying a hobby.

Heat the nesting boxes to stop eggs from freezing.

Forever Water Heater one that lasts.

Unfrozen Nipple Watering for those cold days.

Removing dust the easy way.

Quick and Easy 5 Gallon Waterer.

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Heat the nesting boxes to stop eggs from freezing.

Forever Water Heater one that lasts.

Unfrozen Nipple Watering for those cold days.

Removing dust the easy way.

Quick and Easy 5 Gallon Waterer.

Reply
post #15 of 16
A lot of it will depend on coop size, flock size, how far you have to walk to get there, and how you manage them. In the morning I go down to let them out and make sure they have food and water for the day. Sometimes that’s not much more than a quick look, sometimes it gets more involved. I generally dump their water every other day just to keep it fresh.

I go down in the afternoon and gather eggs plus make sure they have food and water before they go to bed. After dark I go down to lock the pop door.

I scrape my droppings boards maybe once every one to three weeks. With my flock density and such it’s not a day to day thing like some people have. Occasionally I replace nesting material or do other things like that, but time actually required to take care of them isn’t much. I spend more time watching them than taking care of them.

When you come to a fork in the road, take it.

 

"If you make every game a life-and-death proposition, you're going to have problems. For one thing, you'll be dead a lot." — former North Carolina coach Dean Smith

 

http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/how-much-room-do-chickens-need

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When you come to a fork in the road, take it.

 

"If you make every game a life-and-death proposition, you're going to have problems. For one thing, you'll be dead a lot." — former North Carolina coach Dean Smith

 

http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/how-much-room-do-chickens-need

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post #16 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ridgerunner View Post
..... I spend more time watching them than taking care of them.

Indeed, some days it's irresistibly fascinating.

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

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Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
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