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Technical coop building question.

post #1 of 294
Thread Starter 
Moderator I tried posting a similar post before and it didn't work so if for some reason fhjs is duplicate feel free to delete please.
So I'm drawing up plans to build my first coop. I'm doing a modified Wichita so you have an idea what I'm going for. 4x8 coop with 12x8 run. 1. Length is 192". I have 4x4 (C) in corners and framing door with 2x4 (D) for remaining studs. I have them approximately 34" apart but the hardware cloth is 36" should I just add another stud and make them all closer together to accommodate? I know they sell wider pieces but that would be over kill and fhat stuff is very pricey.

2. This is diificult to explain. I'm making a frame on top of a concrete block foundation. So fist is have PT 2x4 (A) for a sill then I have a 1x6 (B) PT for a frame. The studs (C) and (D) go inside this frame. So how do I get the hardware cloth below the level of the frame if I'm putting it on after the studs go in. Here is two pictures of my draft for reference. [IMG]
post #2 of 294
Thread Starter 
Here is the other side of the draft
post #3 of 294

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #4 of 294
I think I understand your question but let me know if I don't. I have build two huge coops and many breeding pens and have made them better each time. When I run my wire across studs I don't run it vertically in between each stud. I run in horizontally the length of the coop/run and if it is say 6 ft tall I would 3 ft wire and run a 1x4 ,"horizontally in the middle of the top and bottom where the wire overlaps to staple the wire too. I find it makes the coop much stronger and more secure from the outside from predators. If you don't understand or I answered the wrong question let me know and I'll draw something or try again
post #5 of 294
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by aart View Post
 

Here's your other thread http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1148474/can-i-really-do-this-myself-coop-dilemma

Should I have posted it all under the same thread?  Hmm, I have not idea how to move it but Ill search around and see if I can figure it out.  Thanks.

post #6 of 294
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bostick18 View Post

I think I understand your question but let me know if I don't. I have build two huge coops and many breeding pens and have made them better each time. When I run my wire across studs I don't run it vertically in between each stud. I run in horizontally the length of the coop/run and if it is say 6 ft tall I would 3 ft wire and run a 1x4 ,"horizontally in the middle of the top and bottom where the wire overlaps to staple the wire too. I find it makes the coop much stronger and more secure from the outside from predators. If you don't understand or I answered the wrong question let me know and I'll draw something or try again

Ok, I get what your saying but even if I run it horizontally a critter could possibly poke through the bottom because it would just be meeting up to the 1x6 frame and not between the 1x6 frame and the studs.  Get what I mean???

 

Also if I do run it horizontally I would probably need another horizontal support between the studs to secure it.  Probably more than one as the front of my coop is 7' tall.  

 

Hmmm, if I run it horiztonally I guess i could put up the mesh then put trim all around on top of the mess to secure it.  

The ones I looked at looked like the ran the mesh vertically.  

 

Thanks for your help you gave me something to think about.

post #7 of 294
I always like to run something along to bottom for the mesh to fasten to 1x4 are perfect. Cheap enough to use them and wide enough to give you a little play on your wire. My area has very little predators but if yours has aa lot keep in mind which side your wire is on. They will have a hard time pushing through horizontal wire stapled on the outside of the studs. And an even harder time if you sandwich the bottom of the wire with a 1x4. I also find the middle 1x4 that's let's you stitch your upper horizontal wire to your lower horizontal wire gives you a spot to screw things. Like nest boxes or waters or hooks for buckets or roost bars or whatever you need. I found myself adding them on the ones that didn't need them for this purpose anyways.
post #8 of 294
And I don't know how you plan to open the door but I always like mine to open in especially if the birds be in for most of the time. And it doesn't hurt to put a couple spring hinges on it to keep it closed behind you if your hands are full
post #9 of 294
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bostick18 View Post

I always like to run something along to bottom for the mesh to fasten to 1x4 are perfect. Cheap enough to use them and wide enough to give you a little play on your wire. My area has very little predators but if yours has aa lot keep in mind which side your wire is on. They will have a hard time pushing through horizontal wire stapled on the outside of the studs. And an even harder time if you sandwich the bottom of the wire with a 1x4. I also find the middle 1x4 that's let's you stitch your upper horizontal wire to your lower horizontal wire gives you a spot to screw things. Like nest boxes or waters or hooks for buckets or roost bars or whatever you need. I found myself adding them on the ones that didn't need them for this purpose anyways.

This is exactly what I am going to do. Thank you so much for the suggestion.

post #10 of 294
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bostick18 View Post

And I don't know how you plan to open the door but I always like mine to open in especially if the birds be in for most of the time. And it doesn't hurt to put a couple spring hinges on it to keep it closed behind you if your hands are full

What are the benefits to having it open in?  My concern with it opening in is my dog or other predator jumping on the door with force and pushing it open.  We have many predators here, coyote, fisher cat, we have even had the occasional black bear wander through.  

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