New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Technical coop building question. - Page 2

post #11 of 294
Then your probably right with having it open out. I have almost no predators here. But with all that there you are right. The spring hinges are still a life saver for me and if your door opens out you can take a leftover piece of one by four and screw it on the in side part of your door frame on the top and bottom so that when your door swings closed it doesn't go too far closed and will also help all those predators from just pushing the door in.. You can also over size your door by a few inches.. The hinges get a little tricky when you do that though
post #12 of 294


My most recent breeding cages
post #13 of 294
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bostick18 View Post



My most recent breeding cages

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by bostick18 View Post



My most recent breeding cages

I think I hit the quote twice ooops.  Anyway, that is impressive.  You have quite the set up.  Thanks for all your help.

post #14 of 294
Quote:
Originally Posted by Merrymouse View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by aart View Post
 

Here's your other thread http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1148474/can-i-really-do-this-myself-coop-dilemma

Should I have posted it all under the same thread?  Hmm, I have not idea how to move it but Ill search around and see if I can figure it out.  Thanks.

Yeah, probably...little late now....don't think you can move/combine 2 threads.

.....and it doesn't really matter, just harder to track two threads..but I'm a bit organization-obsessed...haha!.

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #15 of 294
Quote:
Originally Posted by aart View Post

Yeah, probably...little late now....don't think you can move/combine 2 threads.
.....and it doesn't really matter, just harder to track two threads..but I'm a bit organization-obsessed...haha!.

But you could go back and edit that first post in the other thread to include a link to this post and a request that people respond only to the linked (second) thread. It won't prevent everyone from posting there but should eliminate quite a few. If you also add a new post w/link at the end of that thread directing them to the second then you'll get 99% of people.
Edited by TalkALittle - 1/13/17 at 4:55am
post #16 of 294
Thread Starter 

Thank you for the suggestion, thats a good idea and I did post the links at the top and the bottom so hopefully that will help.

 

Anyway, next issue:  The roof.  So I have no choice due to my lot but to have my coop face north.  So Im having coop on the left (east), run on the right (west) front of coop facing north and back of coop south.  It will be backed up to forrested area.  So I was thinking of using the wavy clear polycarbonate roof to allow winter sunlight in to somewhat warm it up.  Massachusetts winters can be very cold.  But I think the regular roof would be easier, more aesthetically pleasing and may have more insulating value.  What has been everyones experience using polycarbonate vs regular roof with trusses, plywood and either shingles or metal roof?

post #17 of 294
I have always used metal roofing with a piece or two of the polycarbonate. They fit together perfectly and the metal is about a quarter the cost. Chickens like to be closed in at night. I fear an open polycarbonate top would make them feel a little unsecure. With just one sheet or clear properly placed on the roof you get the benefit from the warming/drying sun and the benefit of the dark top cheap roof. You said your coop will be seven ft tall. Is that the coop itself or the run? How will your ventilation be and how tall will your roost be. Out of the permanent coops I've built the ones with the best designed ventilation and interior provide the happiest spot for you and them
post #18 of 294

You can kind of see the sheet of poly on the top
post #19 of 294
Quote:
Originally Posted by Merrymouse View Post
 

Thank you for the suggestion, thats a good idea and I did post the links at the top and the bottom so hopefully that will help.

 

Anyway, next issue:  The roof.  So I have no choice due to my lot but to have my coop face north.  So Im having coop on the left (east), run on the right (west) front of coop facing north and back of coop south.  It will be backed up to forrested area.  So I was thinking of using the wavy clear polycarbonate roof to allow winter sunlight in to somewhat warm it up.  Massachusetts winters can be very cold.  But I think the regular roof would be easier, more aesthetically pleasing and may have more insulating value.  What has been everyones experience using polycarbonate vs regular roof with trusses, plywood and either shingles or metal roof?

In coop probably solid roof would be best because of snow load and water tightness.

Insulation value is moot due good ventilation.

A run roof can benefit from having some clear panels...after you clear the snow off of them ;-)

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by bostick18 View Post

I have always used metal roofing with a piece or two of the polycarbonate. They fit together perfectly and the metal is about a quarter the cost. Chickens like to be closed in at night. I fear an open polycarbonate top would make them feel a little unsecure. With just one sheet or clear properly placed on the roof you get the benefit from the warming/drying sun and the benefit of the dark top cheap roof. You said your coop will be seven ft tall. Is that the coop itself or the run? How will your ventilation be and how tall will your roost be. Out of the permanent coops I've built the ones with the best designed ventilation and interior provide the happiest spot for you and them

LA is not like MA...I would think you'd want a solid roof in LA to keep sun out of coop..at least most the year.

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #20 of 294
Ya never built one for a snow load lol but they can handle some rain! My studs are usually 2 ft apart with 1x4s perpendicular to them to screw the metal too. Would metal help our hurt the snow melting off of it?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav: