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Knoble Chickens Builds a Coop

post #1 of 132
Thread Starter 

Thought I would blog my coop and run here, just getting started on the whole thing. I have the sand for the floor of the run, and I have rough leveled the site with a bit of fill. 

 

 

 

Next is getting and setting cinder blocks for the perimeter of the run.........

I am learnin' this stuff as fast as I can.....
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I am learnin' this stuff as fast as I can.....
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post #2 of 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by RS67Man View Post
 

Thought I would blog my coop and run here, just getting started on the whole thing. I have the sand for the floor of the run, and I have rough leveled the site with a bit of fill. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Next is getting and setting cinder blocks for the perimeter of the run.........


I would never cover up that grass with sand----Let the chickens eat it--LOL.


Edited by PD-Riverman - 2/19/17 at 6:10pm
post #3 of 132
Thread Starter 

Where I am putting the sand it is mostly blackberry vines, rocks and moss. It is also a low spot in the yard where a old metal shed sat for 20 years and needs to be raised up so the run sits on level ground. My first chickens are only 2 weeks old now, and it is way too cold to let them outside yet. Where the sand is sitting now is part of the dog run area. I plan on letting the chickens out of their run as often as I can to run around in a separate garden area, with a fence between them and two scottish terriers I have.


Edited by Knoble Chickens - 2/19/17 at 6:32pm
I am learnin' this stuff as fast as I can.....
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I am learnin' this stuff as fast as I can.....
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post #4 of 132

I'll follow along!

Welcome to BYC!

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #5 of 132
Thread Starter 

Making decisions today. I am not buying the $1000 kit from TSC, I will be making my own. There was too many compromises being made by me if I had bought the kit. The biggest was having a solid roof over the run.

 

The run will be 10'x10'x8'. The coop will be 8'x4'x4', set inside run with about a 4' space underneath. Three nesting boxes at one end of coop will reduce size of the inside length of the coop by about 16 inches, and gives a storage area above the nesting boxes of about 4'Wx2.5'Tx16D". Metal roofing panels to cover entire run. Barn door type access to the coop from outside for cleaning. 

 

I will listen to any and all suggestions, haven't bought any materials besides sand, yet..... I think this is the right size for a 8 chicken flock.


Edited by Knoble Chickens - 2/21/17 at 1:09pm
I am learnin' this stuff as fast as I can.....
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I am learnin' this stuff as fast as I can.....
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post #6 of 132

Ehhh...8x4 would be minimal for 8 birds, unless run was night secure from predators.

 

I'd spend a lot of time researching coop design.

 

This is a good place to start:

http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/how-much-room-do-chickens-need


Edited by aart - 2/21/17 at 1:49pm

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #7 of 132
Thread Starter 

The run will be secure from predators, and there is not a problem with with raccoons in my neighborhood, plus my Scottie dogs keep rats, squirrels and other vermin away. Entire yard is fenced 100%. I was going to put a door on the coop only to keep chickens inside if needed, otherwise it would be open to the run 24/7. Been doing a bit of research, if you think it would be better to put the nesting boxes on the side of the coop, so the coop did not lose space inside, I can do that. I would lose the storage area is all.

 

Been checking out what I would screen the run with. 1/2" mesh hardware cloth is expensive at $160 for 48"x100ft roll, but the best choice. Chicken wire is the cheapest, but would wear out sooner. Then there is wire fencing with 2"x4" mesh, middle of the road cost but hardy. If you made your coop today, what would you use?

 

Thinking of lining the bottom of the coop with the 12 inch squares of stick on vinyl flooring, yea or nay?


Edited by Knoble Chickens - 2/21/17 at 2:32pm
I am learnin' this stuff as fast as I can.....
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I am learnin' this stuff as fast as I can.....
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post #8 of 132

Is your dog outside 24/7?

You might not think there are raccoons around, but I wouldn't put money on it.

Adding chickens can bring them, and other predators, to your attention rather rudely.

 

Having exterior nests will free up some floor space inside.

 

Chicken wire is for keeping chickens where you want them, many preds can chew right thru it.

2x4 welded wire is what my run is made out of, but all my coop openings(windows and vents) have 1/2 HC.

 

I used a single sheet of heavy duty vinyl on coop floor no cracks for a spill to seep thru.

I have a walk-in coop inside a large shed with lots of storage space, 

sure was nice feeding and cleaning under cover while it rained outside this morning.

 

Looked at that TSC coop/run....I'd spend that kind of money on a shed for a coop.

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #9 of 132
Thread Starter 

The dogs have access to the yard 24/7 via a auto doggie door. Any noise from the outside and they explode out the door to investigate. I have lived here since 1989, never had raccoons in the garbage, nor has the neighbors have ever reported raccoon issues. We do have some cats and squirrels around, and possum was a problem at one time. When I fenced my yard 100% 6 years ago, the possum issue went away. I am more worried about my dogs being a problem than anything else. 

 

Stick on tiles are cheap, plus they are used on kitchen and bathroom floors......... ya gotta mop them sometime......hmmmm

I am learnin' this stuff as fast as I can.....
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I am learnin' this stuff as fast as I can.....
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post #10 of 132
Thread Starter 

I spent the day working on site prep and the foundation of the coop. Been doing a lot of thinking on the advise you all have been giving, and I am trying to listen. Coop size is now planned to be 10'x4', with the run still at 10'x10'. A am also going to use the 1/2" hardware cloth for screen. I like the security it gives.

 

I have the cement blocks placed, will back fill and level out the inside of the run in the morning. Then I will have about 4 yards of sand to move. Photos for proof!

 

 

After running guide lines, I started wrestling with Spanaway Spuds, trenching for the cement blocks:

 

 

About halfway done laying blocks:

 

 

Boots kitty checking out my work:

 

They are sorta straight......

 

Ready for back fill and sand!

I am learnin' this stuff as fast as I can.....
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I am learnin' this stuff as fast as I can.....
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