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Knoble Chickens Builds a Coop - Page 3

post #21 of 111
Thread Starter 

Just gave Home Depot some money, now I have wood, hardware and paint. Hopefully I will be able to put together a usable coop and run with it all. First step is setting up a "tent" and painting all of it.........

I am learnin' this stuff as fast as I can.....
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I am learnin' this stuff as fast as I can.....
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post #22 of 111


So far so good. Looks like you're having fun, too!

post #23 of 111
Thread Starter 

Spent part of today moving the last of the sand, and setting up a work tent. Painted the pressure treated sill plates to see if it would dry overnight. Lots more painting to do!

 

The van with a whole bunch of wood, tools etc. in the back

 

Setting up the popup tent

 

Work space all set up.

 

Sawhorses set up for painting and cutting out parts.


Edited by Knoble Chickens - 3/1/17 at 9:46pm
I am learnin' this stuff as fast as I can.....
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I am learnin' this stuff as fast as I can.....
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post #24 of 111

Wow that's quite the 'tent'!

 

Painting the PT....that stuff is often pretty wet when purchased, can't imagine trying to paint it.

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #25 of 111
Thread Starter 

It was actually dry for PT, and it is exterior latex paint. If it has issues, oh well.....I tried.

I am learnin' this stuff as fast as I can.....
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I am learnin' this stuff as fast as I can.....
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post #26 of 111
Thread Starter 

Been working all morning and afternoon spreading the pigment. I now have a bunch of white 2-by lumber. As soon as it dries I will be able to start cutting and constructing. It is being a wet, grey, drizzly, and chilly PNW day, so it might take overnight before it will be ready. The FedEx truck should be bringing the 1/2" HC today, keeping a eye out for it.

 

Proof in photos!

 

Painting 12 footers

 

12 footers all painted

 

 

8 footers being painted

 

2x6 rafters getting white

 

Now to watch paint dry.....

I am learnin' this stuff as fast as I can.....
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I am learnin' this stuff as fast as I can.....
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post #27 of 111

This may be a dumb question, but how do you stack the wood to dry?  Wouldn't the separator piece stick to the wet paint of the bottom layer?

post #28 of 111
Thread Starter 

I have 2x4s separating them, and they may stick, but it isn't going to be like glue or anything. A tap with a hammer, if necessary, will knock them apart. I know there will be some damaged paint, but I planned for that and can touch up whatever gets messed up. Still much easier and less tedious than painting it all after it is put together.

 

The FedEx guy dropped off the HC. If anyone needs to get 1/2" hardware cloth, Amazon has the best deal around. I am set for most of the stuff I need, save for some trim pieces, and a couple other minor things I forgot on my first trip to Home Depot..


Edited by Knoble Chickens - 3/2/17 at 4:21pm
I am learnin' this stuff as fast as I can.....
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I am learnin' this stuff as fast as I can.....
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post #29 of 111

 Nice we picked up a 100 yard roll off amazon it was the best deal we found.

 

on another note. The only animal we have seen and caught eating our chicken was a rot. He wont be back but it got me thinking about the HC. We have lost some to coyotes but behind our back but I have plans for them. Anyways. I did a lot of reading the last few nights and I'm think 8' walls. 4' chain link fence. top and bottom. Then the 1/2" hc on the lower 4' and a apron. So I'll stretch chain link between the poles frame out and attach at top and bottom.

 

I'm just not so sure with the amount of will and muscle in that dog on a choker that the 1/2" hc could have stop him.

 

Scott

post #30 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by ScottandSam View Post
 

 Nice we picked up a 100 yard roll off amazon it was the best deal we found.

 

on another note. The only animal we have seen and caught eating our chicken was a rot. He wont be back but it got me thinking about the HC. We have lost some to coyotes but behind our back but I have plans for them. Anyways. I did a lot of reading the last few nights and I'm think 8' walls. 4' chain link fence. top and bottom. Then the 1/2" hc on the lower 4' and a apron. So I'll stretch chain link between the poles frame out and attach at top and bottom.

 

I'm just not so sure with the amount of will and muscle in that dog on a choker that the 1/2" hc could have stop him.

 

Scott

Ditto on the amazon HC...where I get all mine now.

They use different sources tho, I think, and some has been a little rough on the galvanizing.

 

HC itself is not that strong, torn pretty easily if animal gets a tooth in, why taut installation and secure attachment is so important.

It's to keep the tiny's out(and in, with chicks) heavier mesh definitely needed against larger preds.

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
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