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Lice and Mites - Pictures

post #1 of 25
Thread Starter 

I found a a link with some really good pictures of lice and mites.

http://cpif.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/AmyMurillo.BackyardFlockPestsandManagementTechniques_Oakland.pdf

 

Poultry head lice (Cuclotogaster heterographa):

 


 

 

Red mite (Dermanyssus gallinae)

 


Edited by casportpony - 3/1/17 at 9:26am
post #2 of 25

That looks awful! :(

The difference between involvement and commitment is like an egg and ham breakfast:  the chicken was involved, the pig was committed.
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The difference between involvement and commitment is like an egg and ham breakfast:  the chicken was involved, the pig was committed.
Reply
post #3 of 25
Thread Starter 
Sticktight fleas are visible just below this hen's comb.
Credit: Amy Murillo
 
 

Backyard chickens may live a sweeter life than chickens on commercial poultry farms, but roaming green grass and scratching real dirt exposes these birds to a different suite of parasites than those found in most commercial facilities. A paper in the latest issue of the Journal of Medical Entomology by University of California, Riverside scientists Amy C. Murillo and Bradley A. Mullens reveals what's crawling on backyard birds, and the answer will likely make chicken fanciers itch.

The researchers surveyed 100 adult hens in 20 different backyards in southern California and searched the birds and their coops for ectoparasites. They found a much greater diversity of ectoparasites on the backyard chickens than has been reported in commercial flocks.

Ectoparasites were found on most of the flocks surveyed (80%),and lice were the most common and abundant. Six different species of louse were found on the chickens, and some individual chickens had hundreds of lice. Sticktight fleas were found in only 20% of flocks, but infestations could be quite severe. The northern fowl mite (Ornithonyssus sylviarum) was the most common mite, but the scaly leg mite (Knemidocoptes mutans) and the chicken red mite (Dermanyssus gallinae) were also found.

Commercial poultry flocks are known to suffer from several of the same ectoparasites, but these birds are generally housed in "battery cages" that give them little contact with the ground or substrate that immature stages of parasites like fleas and some mites need to develop. In addition, these cages provide fewer crevices that might harbor ticks or bed bugs when they aren't feeding on birds. Finally, birds in commercial flocks are generally all the same age and breed which may affect the suite of parasites that they host.

The results of this study suggest that some of the perks of being a backyard chicken, such as comfortable coops and access to the outdoors, might also increase the birds' availability to ectoparasites. According to Murillo, many of the chicken owners that participated in this study were surprised to learn that their chickens had ectoparasites, and almost none of the owners were practicing parasite prevention.

Further study of the ectoparasite community on backyard chickens in the U.S. will be necessary to develop effective prevention and treatment techniques. These birds may be enjoying the good life, but it turns out to be fairly itchy.

 

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/01/160111121009.htm

post #4 of 25

We have seen something like the one by the eye on one of our hens by her eye. :/

 

Knowing what you are looking at and what to look for really helps! Yet another one of the links you have provided that I will be bookmarking. :highfive:

 

So from that article it looks like I might not find the head louse near the vent during inspection? Which I didn't, but sprayed the vent area with Permethrin anyways... since I did see SOMETHING. :hu  Didn't spend any withdrawal for eggs, Guess it's a little too late now to wonder if that was safe. I should be more careful in the future! :hide

post #5 of 25
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by EggSighted4Life View Post
 

We have seen something like the one by the eye on one of our hens by her eye. :/

 

Knowing what you are looking at and what to look for really helps! Yet another one of the links you have provided that I will be bookmarking. :highfive:

 

So from that article it looks like I might not find the head louse near the vent during inspection? Which I didn't, but sprayed the vent area with Permethrin anyways... since I did see SOMETHING. :hu  Didn't spend any withdrawal for eggs, Guess it's a little too late now to wonder if that was safe. I should be more careful in the future! :hide

My peafowl only get the head lice, which can be *really* hard to see, and you're right, you won't see them on the vent. When I spray I spray the vent, legs under the wing, and I very carefully try to get some on the head and neck. Permethrin, when used as directed has a zero day egg withdrawal.

post #6 of 25

Thank you so much, I was secretly hoping you would give your input about withdraw! :D

post #7 of 25
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by EggSighted4Life View Post
 

Thank you so much, I was secretly hoping you would give your input about withdraw! :D

A vet on a Face Book page wrote this:

Quote:
 Permethrin (Permectrin II, ProZap, etc) - No egg withdrawal when used according to label directions
Spinosaid (Elector PSP) - No egg withdrawal when used according to label directions

https://www.facebook.com/frontierrots/posts/10210059192089107

post #8 of 25
Thread Starter 

Here is an eye lice/headlice video:

 Sorry for the poor quality. :hide


Edited by casportpony - 3/4/17 at 3:51pm
post #9 of 25

I get the idea, thanks!

 

Discussed which girl we saw it on prior to treating (flock of 50 ish) and we will check her again tomorrow. She just happens to be one that comes over and jumps to be picked up. :love

post #10 of 25
Thread Starter 

Figure 1. Chicken lice (not to scale) collected in survey of backyard poultry in California. (A) Chicken body louse, Menacanthus stramineus; (B) Menacanthus cornutus; (C) Shaft louse, Menopon gallinae; (D) Fluff louse, Goniocotes gallinae; (E) Wing louse, Lipeurus caponis; and (F) Chicken head louse, Cuclotogaster heterographus. Image by A. Murillo, UC Riverside

http://veterinaryentomology.ucr.edu/chickenlice.html

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