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Protection Against Hawks - Page 3

post #21 of 25
We did a criss-cross web of fishing line. Hawks would hit the line when coming in and fly off empty handed.

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ChickenGuardian, official U.S. distributor for ChickenGuard automatic chicken coop door openers.

"To help protect the billions of chickens in the world from predators, and of course allow for their owners to sleep in on Sundays and take vacation without hassle."

Reply
post #22 of 25
I currently have a 10' x 30' enclosed run. One side of my run is made from a 4'x 10' section of cattle panel. The holes in the cattle panel are about 5" x 5". I had put chicken wire over the whole panel, except for the top 5" that was left exposed. Two weekends ago was the first week that I moved my flock of 15 pullers, 2 Roos, and 10 guineas to the new coop and run. I came home from work on the next Monday to spot a hawk flying up in the area of the run. I stop in the drive to inspect, and saw that he had killed 2 guinea's, 1 Easter eager, and my favorite Buff Orpington little Roo, Johnny cash. The Guineas were both partially eaten, and had been dead for a while. The Easter eager had part of the head missing. Couldn't find any damage to Johnny Cash except that he was dead, and still warm.
If I had not seen the hawk flying up, I would still be wondering what killed my birds. I never would have thought a hawk would make his way into a 5" x 5" hole in the side of a fence. So, I fix the fence that evening, come home from work the next day to spot the hawk flying up from the run area again. All the chicks were okay, but had taken cover inside the coop. The guineas looked terrified, and four of them had bruising to their head like they had been flying at the fence in panic.
I stay home from work the next two days, hide out, and watch for the hawk. (No, I wasn't going to kill him, just shoot above him 😜) However, as of yet I still haven't seen that hawk again.
post #23 of 25
That is so sad, I wouldn't think they would get in like that either, they tend to like the hit and run method.
post #24 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by 100chicklover View Post

The roos will signel the hens if they are free ranging and rhey will go hide onder a tree or something and sometimmes they just know and they go onder a tree when they hear a hawk mine do that and if you have a dog like german shepherd they will go after the hawf and scare it away


​My Grandpa was sitting at the kitchen window the other day and saw a hawk fly into the chicken coop(The run doesn't have a top) and fly away with one of his chickens. It pecked the top part of his ducks beak off and it died from its injuries.

post #25 of 25
We have at least one hawk in our area. That telltale screech just drives me crazy! I didn't take any chances and have all sides, including top and bottom covered in the 2"x4" wire! We live in a pretty rural area, surrounded by woods, so I have to watch out for air and ground threats. We have 2 large dogs, one is a good watch dog who I hope will scare away any hungry critters! So far, so good. I would be devastated if anything got to my babies! A friend, who is my chicken co-conspirator, had a neighbors dogs get into her enclosure and kill her 5 EE chicks. It was so heartbreaking.
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