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Feed cost per pound to raise Cornish X broilers? - Page 3

post #21 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by jungleexplorer2 View Post
 

 

A well deserved meal of Chicken Curry.  Oh Yeah!

 

Bon Appetit!

You don't let meat rest for rigor to pass before cooking?


Edited by aart - 4/18/17 at 3:06pm

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #22 of 28
Thread Starter 

There is plenty to eat later.  I was hungry.  Been waited a long time to try this.

post #23 of 28

Hello there. Nice tractor you have there. I have been raising cornish X for years probably at least 9.  I raise them in batches of 12-20 which is what my tractor comfortably holds and what i am comfortable being able to process at one time quickly plus hte cost of feed. Last year after seeing a bunch of post about how the experts raise them I decided to start doing the 12hrs on 12hrs off method of feeding at 4 weeks instead of feeding  them twice a day. The broilers still got to the same weight at 8 weeks, no one had a heart attack, I saved a ton on feed and the they did not create near as much manure waste. It turned out that all the extra feed they were eating was not needed by their bodies so it was just waste all the way around. Also the birds where more active and ate more bugs and grass. I just thought i would share this since it made such an impact on my process for the better. in the last 3 weeks i was feeding 11lbs of grain a day to 20 broilers.

Mom of a little boy, 1 Olde English Bulldogge, 1 bobtailed cat, a whole bunch of salt and fresh water fish, Royal Palm Turkeys, A variety of bantam and standard chickens, and a hedgehog.  Love Gardening, knitting and Canning and raising my own food on a small scale.
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Mom of a little boy, 1 Olde English Bulldogge, 1 bobtailed cat, a whole bunch of salt and fresh water fish, Royal Palm Turkeys, A variety of bantam and standard chickens, and a hedgehog.  Love Gardening, knitting and Canning and raising my own food on a small scale.
Reply
post #24 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jenlyn9483 View Post
 

Hello there. Nice tractor you have there. I have been raising cornish X for years probably at least 9.  I raise them in batches of 12-20 which is what my tractor comfortably holds and what i am comfortable being able to process at one time quickly plus hte cost of feed. Last year after seeing a bunch of post about how the experts raise them I decided to start doing the 12hrs on 12hrs off method of feeding at 4 weeks instead of feeding  them twice a day. The broilers still got to the same weight at 8 weeks, no one had a heart attack, I saved a ton on feed and the they did not create near as much manure waste. It turned out that all the extra feed they were eating was not needed by their bodies so it was just waste all the way around. Also the birds where more active and ate more bugs and grass. I just thought i would share this since it made such an impact on my process for the better. in the last 3 weeks i was feeding 11lbs of grain a day to 20 broilers.

 

 

This was my first time, so I am still learning.  I had not heard about the 12 hour on 12 hour off, but would that not occur naturally if you did not have a light on them at night?  I free fed my birds during the day and provided no light at night, so they rested and did not eat.  By the end of the 6 weeks, I was feeding 46 birds 20lbs a day.  20 x 16 = 320 ounces  320 divided by 46 = 6.9 ounces per bird per day.  Does that sound about right?

Humans have bred chickens over 4000 years.  Today there is a huge array of shapes, size and colors of chickens. What we have observed over the last 4000 years of testing is that, a chicken becomes a chicken no matter what you do to it.  Not once has a chicken become another kind of animal or even a different type of avian.

 

Darwin's stupid theory proven wrong by the humble Chicken!

Reply

Humans have bred chickens over 4000 years.  Today there is a huge array of shapes, size and colors of chickens. What we have observed over the last 4000 years of testing is that, a chicken becomes a chicken no matter what you do to it.  Not once has a chicken become another kind of animal or even a different type of avian.

 

Darwin's stupid theory proven wrong by the humble Chicken!

Reply
post #25 of 28

I Raise Cornish during the Winter so I keep a light on them until 6 weeks during cold nights. Even tho its a red light i can see them in there eating food all night. Your feed conversion sounds pretty close to mine at 12 on and 12 off.

Mom of a little boy, 1 Olde English Bulldogge, 1 bobtailed cat, a whole bunch of salt and fresh water fish, Royal Palm Turkeys, A variety of bantam and standard chickens, and a hedgehog.  Love Gardening, knitting and Canning and raising my own food on a small scale.
Reply
Mom of a little boy, 1 Olde English Bulldogge, 1 bobtailed cat, a whole bunch of salt and fresh water fish, Royal Palm Turkeys, A variety of bantam and standard chickens, and a hedgehog.  Love Gardening, knitting and Canning and raising my own food on a small scale.
Reply
post #26 of 28

So I process 11 more birds today.  Today makes them 7 weeks old.  The average weight of each bird was 3.96 lbs dressed weight.  With the extra feed cost for one more week, the price per pound went up 3 cents to $1.12 per pound.  So feed to meat ratio goes down after 6 weeks.  

Humans have bred chickens over 4000 years.  Today there is a huge array of shapes, size and colors of chickens. What we have observed over the last 4000 years of testing is that, a chicken becomes a chicken no matter what you do to it.  Not once has a chicken become another kind of animal or even a different type of avian.

 

Darwin's stupid theory proven wrong by the humble Chicken!

Reply

Humans have bred chickens over 4000 years.  Today there is a huge array of shapes, size and colors of chickens. What we have observed over the last 4000 years of testing is that, a chicken becomes a chicken no matter what you do to it.  Not once has a chicken become another kind of animal or even a different type of avian.

 

Darwin's stupid theory proven wrong by the humble Chicken!

Reply
post #27 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by jungleexplorer2 View Post

Okay.  So I butchered up 10 birds today.  Here are the stats.  I weighed all the birds after I had cleaned and cut them up.  Here is what I got.  These weights are on the bone with skin.  I used a calibrated postal scale to do this.


1. Breast               = 11.72 pounds
2. Leg Quarters      = 10.45 pounds
3. Wings                =  3.72 pounds
4. Neck and backs  = 7.59 pounds
5. Giblets               = 1.52 pounds
6. Feet                   = 1.78 pounds.

             TOTAL =  36.78 pounds.

Without the feet it is exactly 35 pounds.  I eat the feet but not everyone does.  So if you divide 35 by 10, you get 3.5lbs per bird on average.

Okay here are my cost so far.

50 Two week old Cornish X chicks                                     = $20
3 bags of Naturewise Chick Starter Grower 18% @ $16.99  = $50.97
7 bags of Naturewise MeatBird  22%  @ $14.99                 = $104.93
                     
                                                                       TOTAL = $175.90

I paid $20 for 50 birds, but have lost four birds along the way so I am down to 46.  So if the average weight is 3.5 lbs per bird, then using that average I get 46 X 3.5 = 161 pounds.    If I then divide 175.90 by 161, I get = 1.09 cents per pound.  The average price for organic whole chicken is around $2.99 per pound, so at $1.09 per pound, I came out way ahead.  


I made a video of the butchering process for those that have never done this and want to see how it is done. 


Here is the birds all vacuum sealed up.   







A well deserved meal of Chicken Curry.  Oh Yeah!


post #28 of 28
Can you list the link for the video?
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