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Do you need a permit to shoot and kill a red fox and a ground hog? - Page 2

post #11 of 24
If you 'dispose' of a predator, then anouther will just fill in that space. So in the long term, you are never going to solve the issue. Installing electric netting or wires and locking your flock into a sequre coop at night are the best ways to deal with predator issues.....
DUCK OBSESSED!

Showing and breeding my beautiful flock of Welsh Harlequins
...and a flock of bantam SLW, Partridge Wyandottes, Silver Pencilled Wyandottes, Sulmtaler, Silkie and a Polish mix

2nd place Welsh Harlequin Drake at the UK National Poultry Show 2016
1st place Junenvile Handler at the National Poultry Show 2016
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DUCK OBSESSED!

Showing and breeding my beautiful flock of Welsh Harlequins
...and a flock of bantam SLW, Partridge Wyandottes, Silver Pencilled Wyandottes, Sulmtaler, Silkie and a Polish mix

2nd place Welsh Harlequin Drake at the UK National Poultry Show 2016
1st place Junenvile Handler at the National Poultry Show 2016
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post #12 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by DancingWthDucks View Post

If you 'dispose' of a predator, then anouther will just fill in that space. So in the long term, you are never going to solve the issue. Installing electric netting or wires and locking your flock into a sequre coop at night are the best ways to deal with predator issues.....
Good advice if you live in the suburbs. I live in Central Texas. My closest neighbor lives 1mile from me . The closest town with a walmart is 28 miles. You could say we live in the country, we free range are chickens on a 15 acre section. Electronic fence is not a option. Hunting and fishing is a way of life for us, and killing predators that sneak past our dogs is part of owning chickens. Others might not like how we handle it, but the way I look at it is they are taking food off my table.
post #13 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by DancingWthDucks View Post

If you 'dispose' of a predator, then anouther will just fill in that space. So in the long term, you are never going to solve the issue.....

Not necessarily. Four years ago we had a mother raccoon come into my coop in the middle of the day and kill my mama hen. Raccoon and babies were eliminated, our free range practices weren't changed, yey we have not had another incident like that. Do we still have raccoons? Oh yeah, they're everywhere. We just haven't had any more happen upon the flock since then. Yet. It could and probably will happen again. The same with the mink that got into my coop this winter. That one won't be coming back, and none have come to take its place.

What I'm trying to say is, in my experience anyway, despite the fact that potential predators are all around us, they aren't always eating my chickens. They have plenty of other things to eat, and our nuisance ones are those who have happened upon an easy meal. They are eliminated and we don't have problems until something else comes along months or years later. Just to be clear, though, that doesn't mean we don't lock up our chickens up at night, nor does it mean they are not in a secure coop when there is a threat. It's just that we don't have predators lurking about just waiting for that void to fill once there's an opening.

Chickens off and on for 25+ years and still learning.

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Chickens off and on for 25+ years and still learning.

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post #14 of 24
You have the right to protect your livestock... the exception being federally protected animals like wolves and raptors... I agree with Bobbi-J... predators are predators but not all will make a habit of eating your chickens... that is something that needs to be dealt with because it will continue. I live in the woods, I have seen every Predator you can imagine in my yard and have only had one problem with my chickens... but that being said predators also need to be managed to keep a healthy balance!

I just want to point out that live trapping is often suggested and can be a good idea except people don't realize that a lot of times you are essentially taking your problem and relocating it to be someone else's problem!

Best luck with your critter problem!
post #15 of 24
I practice the 3 S method for predators:
Shoot
Shovel
Shut Up

wink.png
post #16 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by krazytrain6 View Post

I practice the 3 S method for predators:
Shoot
Shovel
Shut Up

wink.png
X2
post #17 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by JSF 6494 View Post

Lately I've been having issues with a ground hog and a fox that live near my coop. I've tried things to keep them away, such as shutting the chickens up earlier and letting them out later but they've just been coming earlier. So far they've killed seven chickens and four ducks. I actually never thought a ground hog would get them until I saw him out there trying to get in the pen. I don't want to have to shoot them, but I don't see any other way. Would I need to get a permit to shoot them? I don't know anything about permits and I tried researching but I can't find any direct answers so I'm hoping someone here could help me.


​I think it is unlikely that a ground hog would kill your chickens and ducks.  He might want to get in the pens to get at the feeder.  Ground hogs love chicken food.  We had a huge one the other year going into the open run with ducks, chickens and bantams and not hurting anything but eating at the feeder along with the poultry.

     Also, be careful, some will run but others will stand and fight a dog, even a large dog.  When I was a child we had a collie who killed several ground hogs who were dumb enough to fight him ( he went after them.) but he did have marks on his face.

post #18 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by bjo_6 View Post

You have the right to protect your livestock... the exception being federally protected animals like wolves and raptors... I agree with Bobbi-J... predators are predators but not all will make a habit of eating your chickens... that is something that needs to be dealt with because it will continue. I live in the woods, I have seen every Predator you can imagine in my yard and have only had one problem with my chickens... but that being said predators also need to be managed to keep a healthy balance!

I just want to point out that live trapping is often suggested and can be a good idea except people don't realize that a lot of times you are essentially taking your problem and relocating it to be someone else's problem!

Best luck with your critter problem!


​In many states you have the right to protect your livestock "if" you derive a certain portion of your income from them.  Having backyard chickens does not make you a farmer as discussed in the PA example above.   I certainly agree with eliminating the pests, but many cannot shoot them, as they live in residential areas.  Again just because you have a couple of chickens. doesn't make you a farmer by definition, so YMMV.

post #19 of 24
When I had a fox problem I contacted the conservation dept to see about relocating them...they said they wouldn't do that in case the area they relocated them to didn't have adequate food or water. They said to try to scare them away with loud music and balloons *cue eye roll*. We got a LGD and have not had any incidences for quite awhile....until yesterday. Big dude was out patrolling by the goats and the darn fox nabbed up two hens before he could get back to the coop. The foxes we're dealing with are weird. They strike in broad daylight. Anyways- planning on posting up this weekend to see if we cant "scare" the darn things away for good this time.
post #20 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by sannabelle View Post

When I had a fox problem I contacted the conservation dept to see about relocating them...they said they wouldn't do that in case the area they relocated them to didn't have adequate food or water. They said to try to scare them away with loud music and balloons *cue eye roll*. We got a LGD and have not had any incidences for quite awhile....until yesterday. Big dude was out patrolling by the goats and the darn fox nabbed up two hens before he could get back to the coop. The foxes we're dealing with are weird. They strike in broad daylight. Anyways- planning on posting up this weekend to see if we cant "scare" the darn things away for good this time.
You can't scare a fox away for good. As long as you have chickens they will come back. It would be best to shoot them. If they are they are taking chickens in the daytime then somthings wrong with them, and you wouldn't want your dog killing them and getting sick.
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