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Can you eat a once frozen egg? - Page 2

post #11 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by patvetzal 

UUmmm-Doesn't frying kill bacteria? Ditto boiling? Might not want to try it sunny side up....hmm


Many pathogenic bacteria are killed by cooking, BUT any toxins they produced are left behind. These toxins are rarely denatured by the heat used in stovetop cooking. For example, Salmonellosis is when you are actually infected by the Salmonella bacteria. Botulism is caused by not the bacteria itself, Clostridium botulinum, but by the botulinum toxin, which is a metabolic waste product made by the bacteria.

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My backyard flock: Five Araucana girls, two Araucana boys, and seven Magpie ducks.

 

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post #12 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stacykins View Post


Many pathogenic bacteria are killed by cooking, BUT any toxins they produced are left behind. These toxins are rarely denatured by the heat used in stovetop cooking. For example, Salmonellosis is when you are actually infected by the Salmonella bacteria. Botulism is caused by not the bacteria itself, Clostridium botulinum, but by the botulinum toxin, which is a metabolic waste product made by the bacteria.

but botulism is mostly found in can goods.  the biggest threat in an egg i believe would be salmonella.

post #13 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by sprouticus View Post

but botulism is mostly found in can goods.  the biggest threat in an egg i believe would be salmonella.


There's pretty much no way you can get botulism from an egg.

 

In the egg processing world, there are two kinds of broken eggs--cracks and leakers. Cracks are eggs that are cracked, membrane intact. Don't worry about eating these, they are just fine--that membrane is tough. We get a lot of eggs every day, and cracks are pretty common. We just use them first. Leakers are those where the membrane is broken. I'd throw those away.

 

Frozen eggs are fine to eat, but the texture may suffer.

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post #14 of 18

I checked this thread out this morning as our eggs are sometimes frozen but now I had them for breakfast and they were really good.  Cracked ones go to the dogs though.  Thanks for the thread.

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Cadbury 3 yr old lop bunny and my Peeps
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Collen from beautiful Ontario Canada
Mom to Ozzy white 9 yr old Boxer boy, Diesel 11 month old long haired German Shepherd
Cadbury 3 yr old lop bunny and my Peeps
Two skin kids, Bruce and Scott and the best DH in the world
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post #15 of 18

Just a question... if you have eggs that have frozen and not cracked, will this change the texture/ color/ taste of the egg innards? Is there a quality change? So, could this egg still be sold if it isn't damaged and had been previously frozen?

I sometimes think that some people can't relate to the affection humans can have for a tiny chicken... unless they experience that special, dynamic, human-pet relationship bond themselves. Until we had chickens of our own, we then realized everything we'd previously known or assumed about them was incorrect. How fortunate to be involved in the secret lives of chickens!  Lisa 
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I sometimes think that some people can't relate to the affection humans can have for a tiny chicken... unless they experience that special, dynamic, human-pet relationship bond themselves. Until we had chickens of our own, we then realized everything we'd previously known or assumed about them was incorrect. How fortunate to be involved in the secret lives of chickens!  Lisa 
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post #16 of 18

I've read,  If the shells are still intact, the eggs can be thawed in the refrigerator and used in a thoroughly cooked dish such as scrambled eggs or hard-cooked eggs. Other uses are limited because once frozen the consistency of the egg yolk changes from a liquid to a solid (much like a hard rubber ball), and becomes lumpy. 

Collen from beautiful Ontario Canada
Mom to Ozzy white 9 yr old Boxer boy, Diesel 11 month old long haired German Shepherd
Cadbury 3 yr old lop bunny and my Peeps
Two skin kids, Bruce and Scott and the best DH in the world
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Collen from beautiful Ontario Canada
Mom to Ozzy white 9 yr old Boxer boy, Diesel 11 month old long haired German Shepherd
Cadbury 3 yr old lop bunny and my Peeps
Two skin kids, Bruce and Scott and the best DH in the world
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post #17 of 18

I would add that it appears that some folks freeze eggs for storage (up to 4 months). The recommendation is to beat the egg yolk softly to break it up without adding air before freezing. At the Manitoba Egg Farmers website http://www.mbegg.mb.ca/tips-foodhandling.html they recommend that one should add salt or sugar to the yolk, depending on intended use, before freezing. I don't have any idea whether these additions help the yolk to maintain original consistency when thawed or have some other purpose. 

post #18 of 18

So far as cooking it goes,this way worked well for me. 

I boiled the frozen cracked egg in shallow water for a few minutes.  Then I stuck my knife into the crack. 

after opening the crack a bit poured/scooped the egg out of its shell.

I then just treated it like a normal egg on a pan.

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