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Worm Farming.

post #1 of 82
Thread Starter 

I have done lots of research on worm farming in the past but I hear it can be a profitable business if you find the right customers.

What do farmers markets do with worms anyways? Why is it that I am told to sell my worms to them all the time?

Does anyone here do worm farming? If so, please contact me!

post #2 of 82

I have had a few thousand red worms (they reproduce at a pretty good rate but take a bit to fatten up and grow a good length) in a worm bin a year or so ago and they make excellent compost.  It's called vermiculture I think.  They are easy to take care of and eat alot of food scraps..my problem was that my baby chicks at the time absolutley LOVED the worms so I fed them out before they had a chance to replinish themselves.  They sell at the bait shops for about 6 or 7 bucks a handful..pretty pricey.  If you are selling for fish bait, you cna raise earthworms, for compost, you have to have redworms..more expensive worm and they migrate up not down like the earthworm.  Lots of people use old chest type freezers to raise worms in...a great venture..I wish you good luck.  A sign in your yard for worms and eggs and you could make a good bit of pocket money. thumbsup  Here's a "worm bin"..the stacked worm condo by the fence.. http://i218.photobucket.com/albums/cc150/Scrambled_Egg/yard/HPIM8901.jpg

"What?????? You mean we AREN'T in Kansas anymore??????"

     9 Sassy Hens - 5 Barred Rock & 4 Rhode Island Reds
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"What?????? You mean we AREN'T in Kansas anymore??????"

     9 Sassy Hens - 5 Barred Rock & 4 Rhode Island Reds
Reply
post #3 of 82

I've often consider buying one of the worm condos.  I think it would be a ideal addition to my garden, plus I think the girls might enjoy an ocassional worm or two as a treat.

When having problems with chickens stop and think, what would Harlan do?
I've dealt with many thorns in my life and the flower is always worth the effort.

6 Nest rollout nest box plans  http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/287684/new-rollout-nest-design-picture-heavy-edited-1-21

Smoker plans http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/721017/opas-recirculating-smoker

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When having problems with chickens stop and think, what would Harlan do?
I've dealt with many thorns in my life and the flower is always worth the effort.

6 Nest rollout nest box plans  http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/287684/new-rollout-nest-design-picture-heavy-edited-1-21

Smoker plans http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/721017/opas-recirculating-smoker

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post #4 of 82
Thread Starter 

Ya I thought about buying one of those CanOWorms worm bins. They are pretty expensive. But I gues all things take early expenses to get going. How well do Red Worms sell at Farmers Markets? That is the type of worm I would wanna do. THat way I could use some at my house for garden purposes as well.

post #5 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by yanks26 

Ya I thought about buying one of those CanOWorms worm bins. They are pretty expensive. But I gues all things take early expenses to get going. How well do Red Worms sell at Farmers Markets? That is the type of worm I would wanna do. THat way I could use some at my house for garden purposes as well.


You can make your won worm bin from a rubbermaid container.  Cheap $5 depending on size!  All you do is drill holes for ventilation and draining and add a little dirt and fill with kitchen scraps, newspaper and such.  Right now mine is full and my worms are happy.  Make sure you get re worms NOT earth worms!!!  Reds compost and thats what ya want.  THey are too small to feed to the chickens really...besides you can put them in your garden if you have too laarge a population!

post #6 of 82

Have any of y'all ever raised redworms (for compost and for garbage disposal) in the basement? What was it like odor-wise? I keep wanting to do this, but up here they'd HAVE to be in the basement for about half the year and if there was ANY aroma at all, WWIII would break out in the house hmm ...


Pat

post #7 of 82
Thread Starter 

Haha ya I was wondering the same thing. I live in CT and it gets mighty cold up here. I heard if you leave them in a shed or garage it would work fine but I dont really understand either. I feel like the dirt and worms would freeze still. How do we fix this problem without bringing them inside the house?

post #8 of 82
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by onebuggirl 
Quote:
Originally Posted by yanks26 

Ya I thought about buying one of those CanOWorms worm bins. They are pretty expensive. But I gues all things take early expenses to get going. How well do Red Worms sell at Farmers Markets? That is the type of worm I would wanna do. THat way I could use some at my house for garden purposes as well.


You can make your won worm bin from a rubbermaid container.  Cheap $5 depending on size!  All you do is drill holes for ventilation and draining and add a little dirt and fill with kitchen scraps, newspaper and such.  Right now mine is full and my worms are happy.  Make sure you get re worms NOT earth worms!!!  Reds compost and thats what ya want.  THey are too small to feed to the chickens really...besides you can put them in your garden if you have too laarge a population!


What do you use to catch all the worm tea that falls through the bottom?

post #9 of 82

I'm so glad you posted this! I saw one of those worm composter contraptions but it was about $100! I thought there must be a way to make one cheaper. When I was reading about the worm composter it said they shouldn't be in temps under 40 degrees, so it would have to be in the basement here. I don't see the Rubbermaid bins working for me - wouldn't "stuff" fall out of the holes?

And what about the smell?

post #10 of 82

Nevermind - I found this little goody when I Googled!

http://www.wikihow.com/Make-Your-Own-Worm-Compost-System

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