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Speckledhen's Ten Commandments of Good Flock Management - Page 7

post #61 of 309

It's unfortunate that such a great and informative post is turning into a debate.  Speckledhen posted some outstanding advice that can be used as a good rule of thumb.  Anyone can delve deeper into the specifics of chicken-keeping and flock management and definitely should, but these "ten commandments" are a great guideline for anyone.  I plan on making copies for all of my customers and also posting it on the website I am developing.  I don't think Speckledhen posted this for everyone to debate and argue about, I think she took time out of her life to create an informative list on some basics of caring for poultry that can help people who need information.

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"Live like you ain't afraid to die, and don't be scared, just enjoy your ride."
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post #62 of 309

I completely agree with you Buster. Now I think the mods need to close this topic as it is getting out of hand with those who wish to challenge the main topic.

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mostly orps here!  We have five daughters, one foster son and 18 grandchildren and 9  great-grandchildren by this September!  Yes, there is a God

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post #63 of 309
Thread Starter 

Thank you, Jared and Carrie. People,  if you want to write your own list/book, go ahead. Not a day goes by that someone doesn't PM me and ask me to look at a post under Diseases or help them diagnose their bird or an issue with their coop, etc. I've said over and over  that I am not a vet, yet some believe I have all the answers. This list is the answer to those posts/PMs. This is how I handle disease and this is what I recommend. That's all. I'm not debating it, period. If you have an avian vet, by all means, consult one. Bet you wont hear the same exact opinion about any one subject, even among avian vets.

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From now till Sept 1, make any purchase at www.blueroocreations.com  web store, where every artisan is a veteran or spouse of a veteran, and receive a surprise free handmade gift with your order!

The Blue Roo Creations Mascot, Lancelot, says, "Support Our Troops!"


Follow Along with The Evolution of Atlas

 

~A dog on its owner's property is a pet; A dog on someone else's property is a predator~

 

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post #64 of 309

3. No Flaming (verbally attacking people or groups of people - e.g. a profession, an organization, a company.)
4. No Trolling (posting to provoke others, luring them to flame or rant). Trolling is sometimes done involuntary, so please be considerate when posting.

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Mille Fleur Cochin Progress page- http://www.backyardchickens.com/web/viewblog.php?id=10091-mille-fleur-cochin-progress
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post #65 of 309

i just read this whole thing from beginning to end. i can't imagine ANYONE new culling for just any reason. i think that is making a rather strong assumption. new people tend to go the opposite way, want to hang on to chickens for any reason whatsoever. they are NOT going to go out and either get rid of or kill a chicken because of a sentence in a post they read on the internet. what responsibility does the o.p. have to that anyway? she was just trying to make a post that gave her general ideas and things that worked for her. some of my ideas are different, but i didn't get the feeling she was going to come to my house and make me do it that way. lol. well, if you do show up, key's under the mat. wink

post #66 of 309

People, this is a warning.  Speckledhen has taken her time to post this pertinent information at the request of many BYC members.  She is constantly being asked for advice as to what to do with ones flock and she has been gracious enough to post here what she would do and how she raises her birds.  This is her opinion about how her flock is raised and the information that so many of you keep asking about.  If you don't agree, fine, move on.  This is absolutely in no way a debate and will not be turned into such.  We will not tolerate anymore trolling in this thread.  Please note rule #4 in the rules section:

4. No Trolling (posting to provoke others, luring them to flame or rant). Trolling is sometimes done involuntary, so please be considerate when posting.


Thank you.

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post #67 of 309
Quote:
Originally Posted by speckledhen 

here is the "Speckledhen Method" in a nutshell.


I would say that this sums it up. Everyone will develop their own ways and methods. Nobody says you must follow it, it is just what one person has learned from years of experience and found has been able to keep their stock healthy.

Please play nice.

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I'm no expert, there is always something to learn, and my birds are livestock, so... yes, I may be quite blunt. wink.png

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Need egg candling reference pics? Click HERE!
2011 Coop build! Click Here!

 

I'm no expert, there is always something to learn, and my birds are livestock, so... yes, I may be quite blunt. wink.png

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post #68 of 309

I hope this thread doesn't get shut down.

Biosecurity is especially a big deal for newbies because when you are first building a flock you have the least experience and the greatest desire to increase your numbers. It's like two forces of nature acting against eachother. I personally have bennefitted greatly form the advice provided on this forum from speckled hen in this area the most.
We all manage our flocks a little differently but having an idea of the basics even as a way to acknowledge what we did wrong at some point or what we would do differently in the future is good management. I admit I've bought started birds before...but I did quaranteen them for a month thanks to advice from speckled hen. And I have also culled a bird with respitory problems. None of it was easy, but getting well informed of good practices and trying to stick with it has blessed me with a very healthy flock.
Being well informed has also helped me deal with one particular neighbor who is very concerned about bird flu in a respectful way. We've been able to discuss my safety measures as well as the fifteen wild bird feeders in his yard that are a reasonable concern for me.

Spring is just around the corner and undoubtedly many more new bird owners will be checking out this forum for tips and information at an increased pace so it is vital to give the best information available and then let them make their own decisions on what information to use or not use.

post #69 of 309
Quote:
Originally Posted by speckledhen 

What I touched on, as well as Stacey, is the stress of adding new birds. We just want all to know that there truly is something to be stressed about--the possibility of losing your entire flock to disease if you are not extremely careful in adding birds to your flock. After Hawkeye got a clean bill of health way back in our first year of chicken-raising, I said NEVER again would I do that. Even careful people have lost their flocks when they bought birds who came down with nasty stuff during quarantine.


It creates a stress on your birds by adding new, yet if you have a closed flock, you have a broody or incubate yourself, that is keeping the same health issues as you already have.
I find it interesting (yes, here I go again) is when we purchase a new bird, put it in quarantine for a strict 30+/- days and its as healthy as the day is long. (especially battery hens) That when you put that new bird in and its just like you wake up one morning and your birds are all bloody including walls etc.
Yet the quarantined bird is as healthy as the day is long.
This new bird may have had inoculations to prevent certain diseases such as ILT and now you have to cull them out of humane treatment.
Someone said

the more they learn the more stupid I feel


- Amen.

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Northern New England Bird Fanciers Association      http://northernnewenglandbirdfanciers.webs.com/
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post #70 of 309
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by spook 
Quote:
Originally Posted by speckledhen 

What I touched on, as well as Stacey, is the stress of adding new birds. We just want all to know that there truly is something to be stressed about--the possibility of losing your entire flock to disease if you are not extremely careful in adding birds to your flock. After Hawkeye got a clean bill of health way back in our first year of chicken-raising, I said NEVER again would I do that. Even careful people have lost their flocks when they bought birds who came down with nasty stuff during quarantine.


It creates a stress on your birds by adding new, yet if you have a closed flock, you have a broody or incubate yourself, that is keeping the same health issues as you already have.
I find it interesting (yes, here I go again) is when we purchase a new bird, put it in quarantine for a strict 30+/- days and its as healthy as the day is long. (especially battery hens) That when you put that new bird in and its just like you wake up one morning and your birds are all bloody including walls etc.
Yet the quarantined bird is as healthy as the day is long.
This new bird may have had inoculations to prevent certain diseases such as ILT and now you have to cull them out of humane treatment.
Someone said

the more they learn the more stupid I feel


- Amen.


Double Amen! Yes, quarantine is not perfect, not by a long shot, due to the carrier status of some birds. I've always said it's just the least you can do to prevent issues. The most you can do is not obtain a bird who must be quarantined in the first place. Every person must decide what gambles they are willing to take.

From now till Sept 1, make any purchase at www.blueroocreations.com  web store, where every artisan is a veteran or spouse of a veteran, and receive a surprise free handmade gift with your order!

The Blue Roo Creations Mascot, Lancelot, says, "Support Our Troops!"


Follow Along with The Evolution of Atlas

 

~A dog on its owner's property is a pet; A dog on someone else's property is a predator~

 

Reply

From now till Sept 1, make any purchase at www.blueroocreations.com  web store, where every artisan is a veteran or spouse of a veteran, and receive a surprise free handmade gift with your order!

The Blue Roo Creations Mascot, Lancelot, says, "Support Our Troops!"


Follow Along with The Evolution of Atlas

 

~A dog on its owner's property is a pet; A dog on someone else's property is a predator~

 

Reply
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