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post #17211 of 17410
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldfartfarmer View Post
 

OK so my chicks are 8 and 9 weeks old,, 2-giant jerseys 2 buff brahmas, 2 easter eggers

when do i start feeding them the feed i give my 2 yr old comets? I got them as pullets no idea at what age 2 yrs ago, when i was new to this,

 

I just penned in an area out in the coop for the chicks, and Hansel and Gretal (my 2 yr olds)

are crowing like roosters,,peeking in the coop,,,(they lost there 4 sisters to a fox,,free ranging, and have been penned up since)

 

got 1/4 bag of medicated chick feed left, and a full bag of un medicated,,  

 

getting a separate outside pen set up this week for the chicks, and hope to slowly integrate the wee little ones in with the BIG girls little by little

 

Your pullets shouldn't eat layer feed until they're ready to begin laying.  If you don't want the hassle of feeding separate types of feed you can give everyone an "all flock" or grower type feed and then supply oyster shell separately.  The girls who need the shell will eat it and the others may investigate but won't bother with it for the most part. 

 

As for your hens crowing, that's not unusual for hens to take on the roll and even traits of a rooster when there isn't one present which include crowing and even growing spurs. 


Edited by islandgirl82 - 6/21/16 at 4:53am

In a cottage at the edge of the sea.

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In a cottage at the edge of the sea.

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post #17212 of 17410

Just to add another opinion - I've transitioned 6 week old birds out to the coop where sometimes the only feed is layer. I usually offer 2 types of feed, layer and grower, and sometimes alternate, but layer is usually at least 60% of what I feed. 

 

I don't think it's a good idea to wait until they start laying to add calcium. I like to increase their stores early (sometimes too early but it is what it is) because they deplete so much laying. When mine first start laying they have nice thick shells. 

A lonely blue girl guards the riverbed, she shakes her brown torch at the tide...

 

 

 

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A lonely blue girl guards the riverbed, she shakes her brown torch at the tide...

 

 

 

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post #17213 of 17410

I like the way SCG thinks, and I agree with that thought process.  IMO, chicks transition to the flock better when done early, before they start getting their adult voices.  Due to multiple issues, I've been delayed with that process here.  I like to integrate before 8 weeks, for sure.  As far as feed, I generally use multi-flock or unmedicated starter for the whole flock when I have chicks, but intend to put chicks and adults both on layer as soon as current bags of starter are used up.


Edited by lazy gardener - 6/21/16 at 11:22am

Jesus Christ is my pilot.

My husband of 41 years is my best friend and co-pilot.

Enjoying my gardens.  My flock are my garden helpers.

Breeding a winter hearty flock with small combs and colored eggs.

Favorite breeds:  Dominique and EE.  Hatching addict.

 

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1084432/egg-gender-selection-survey

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1013154/byc-member-interview-laz...

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Jesus Christ is my pilot.

My husband of 41 years is my best friend and co-pilot.

Enjoying my gardens.  My flock are my garden helpers.

Breeding a winter hearty flock with small combs and colored eggs.

Favorite breeds:  Dominique and EE.  Hatching addict.

 

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1084432/egg-gender-selection-survey

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1013154/byc-member-interview-laz...

Reply
post #17214 of 17410

+1 for putting layers on pellets early. Unless they're meat birds, or unless I have excess starter to burn through, one type of feed goes out to the pasture.

 

I do feed a higher protein layer pellet than most, 18%, which is very close to starter to begin with but of marginal importance. There's no issue with the added calcium once they're 6-8 weeks old, the internal organs of concern are largely mature at that age.

post #17215 of 17410

Learning something new every day.  Whenever I've had chicks, I've always waited until they're about 14-16 weeks before switching them over to layer because of the fear of organ damage but figured they were close enough to laying at that they'd be alright.  As I've understood it, Roosters aren't supposed to have the layer feed either for the same reasons.  Those of you who keep roosters, do you also let them have the layer or do you go with the grower/all flock type feeds? 

In a cottage at the edge of the sea.

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In a cottage at the edge of the sea.

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post #17216 of 17410
Quote:
Originally Posted by islandgirl82 View Post
 

Learning something new every day.  Whenever I've had chicks, I've always waited until they're about 14-16 weeks before switching them over to layer because of the fear of organ damage but figured they were close enough to laying at that they'd be alright.  As I've understood it, Roosters aren't supposed to have the layer feed either for the same reasons.  Those of you who keep roosters, do you also let them have the layer or do you go with the grower/all flock type feeds? 

 

Roosters and toms and drakes and whatever you call a male guinea eat layer at this house. 

A lonely blue girl guards the riverbed, she shakes her brown torch at the tide...

 

 

 

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A lonely blue girl guards the riverbed, she shakes her brown torch at the tide...

 

 

 

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post #17217 of 17410
Quote:
Originally Posted by superchemicalgirl View Post
 

 

Roosters and toms and drakes and whatever you call a male guinea eat layer at this house. 


 

 

Thank you for your reply and that's good to know.  I don't have any chicks but my rooster is on the same feed as my hens, in part because I didn't have anything else on hand when he arrived unexpectedly and he's foraging mostly anyway.


Edited by islandgirl82 - 6/22/16 at 6:08am

In a cottage at the edge of the sea.

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In a cottage at the edge of the sea.

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post #17218 of 17410

So many folks get bent out of shape about younger birds eating layer pellets.  However, you rarely hear those same folks getting upset about roosters eating layer.  IMO, it's not such a big deal.  Yeah, when I have chicks, I keep the whole flock on starter or multi-flock.  And often do the same in the winter, figuring that they need more protein.  I may be misguided on that point.  But, if birds are foraging, they're getting loads of calcium from the vegetation.  How often do you hear of a rooster getting sick and dying?  If a roo who NEVER lays eggs can handle the calcium, I'm guessing that a pullet who will eventually start laying can handle the calcium also.  Nor, do the same folks who get upset about non laying birds getting layer feed take them off layer pellets when they molt, or take a winter break.  

Jesus Christ is my pilot.

My husband of 41 years is my best friend and co-pilot.

Enjoying my gardens.  My flock are my garden helpers.

Breeding a winter hearty flock with small combs and colored eggs.

Favorite breeds:  Dominique and EE.  Hatching addict.

 

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1084432/egg-gender-selection-survey

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1013154/byc-member-interview-laz...

Reply

Jesus Christ is my pilot.

My husband of 41 years is my best friend and co-pilot.

Enjoying my gardens.  My flock are my garden helpers.

Breeding a winter hearty flock with small combs and colored eggs.

Favorite breeds:  Dominique and EE.  Hatching addict.

 

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1084432/egg-gender-selection-survey

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1013154/byc-member-interview-laz...

Reply
post #17219 of 17410

Ok, next newbie question. I was thinking of putting some solar lights around my run. I think it will look nice and if there is a commotion back there, I may be able to see what is going on as I race out to the rescue. Will the solar lights be an ok idea? Or am I just lighting the way for predators?

Home of 2 White Sultans, 2 Polish, 2 Cochin, 2 Hamburg, 2 cats, and two dogs (one Basenji and one Shepard mix), and two children.
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Home of 2 White Sultans, 2 Polish, 2 Cochin, 2 Hamburg, 2 cats, and two dogs (one Basenji and one Shepard mix), and two children.
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post #17220 of 17410

IMO, they would be a good idea, as long as they don't shine in the coop windows.  I have several solar lights between my back door and the coop:  The kind that you stick into the ground.

Jesus Christ is my pilot.

My husband of 41 years is my best friend and co-pilot.

Enjoying my gardens.  My flock are my garden helpers.

Breeding a winter hearty flock with small combs and colored eggs.

Favorite breeds:  Dominique and EE.  Hatching addict.

 

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1084432/egg-gender-selection-survey

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1013154/byc-member-interview-laz...

Reply

Jesus Christ is my pilot.

My husband of 41 years is my best friend and co-pilot.

Enjoying my gardens.  My flock are my garden helpers.

Breeding a winter hearty flock with small combs and colored eggs.

Favorite breeds:  Dominique and EE.  Hatching addict.

 

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1084432/egg-gender-selection-survey

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1013154/byc-member-interview-laz...

Reply
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