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post #17681 of 18064

TY.  

 

Good news everyone!  My walk in freezer is functioning very well.  I keep a cooler on the deck throughout the winter for overflow items from fridge and freezer.  

Ephesians 2:10  For we are his workmanship, created in Christ Jesus for good works, which God prepared beforehand, that we should walk in them.

 

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1013154/byc-member-interview-lazy-gardener

http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/yes-you-certainly-can-brood-chicks-outdoors

https://tikktok.wordpress.com/2014/04/13/fermented-feed-faq/

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Ephesians 2:10  For we are his workmanship, created in Christ Jesus for good works, which God prepared beforehand, that we should walk in them.

 

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1013154/byc-member-interview-lazy-gardener

http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/yes-you-certainly-can-brood-chicks-outdoors

https://tikktok.wordpress.com/2014/04/13/fermented-feed-faq/

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post #17682 of 18064
Quote:
Originally Posted by lazy gardener View Post
 

How would you compare the amount of work involved in the bees compared to the work with your chicken flock?  For comparison, my winter flock is 16 birds, and my summer flock can go up to 40 birds.  I've heard it's expensive.  I've heard that top bar cuts the risk of mites, and the associated need to medicate the hive.  And, if I got involved in it, I think I'd make my own hive.  I have a friend who has an extractor.  


I have 2 goats, 10 chickens and currently 4 hives. For me, I feel like the bees are more of a burden than the first two combined, which probably sounds ridiculous! I totally agree with SCG that on a day-to-day basis it isn't comparable, but I find that the bees constantly keep me worried. In the spring, try as I might, I always get swarms, so I'm up in trees cutting down branches, scrambling for extra boxes, watching for afterswarms, etc. Then in summer I do try to inspect at least once a month. I should do it more, but to be honest I find it difficult to manage the boxes myself. I use 10-frame deeps for my brood boxes and when they are full they are heavy! I treat for mites in the fall and feed as needed (I also use a top feeder). For winter I wrap the hives, put on mouse guards and candyboards, and worry some more about whether or not they'll make it! A lot of people in my county (Cumberland) didn't extract this year because of the drought. For the first time in awhile folks are worried about winter starvation even with candy on.

 

Start up costs are fairly high, like SCG said. If you have to replace your bees annually, that gets pricey quickly, too. I would definitely start with an over-wintered local nucleus colony if you can. That way you know you've got stock that can take a Maine winter! If you do purchase a southern package, consider re-queening with a northern-raised queen. After the first few years (I'm only in my 3rd), I anticipate expenses will even out, as I now have the basic and extra supplies I need. I am sure I could do it less expensively if I were more handy. Alas, that just isn't the case.

 

I have taken several beekeeping classes through the Cooperative Extension in my county, which I highly recommend doing.

 

And to make this novel somehow relate to chickens... they are all out in this chilly weather and don't seem the least bit bothered! My greyhound on the other hand... I can barely get her out the door, even with her jacket on!

post #17683 of 18064

I highly recommend getting the "all medium" hive - it's not as heavy to lift each box and all the frames and foundation are compatible because everything is the same. 2 deeps = 3 mediums. And yes, take a class. 

A lonely blue girl guards the riverbed, she shakes her brown torch at the tide...

 

 

 

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A lonely blue girl guards the riverbed, she shakes her brown torch at the tide...

 

 

 

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post #17684 of 18064

My family kept bees when I was little, using my great grandfather's old hives.  We had many hives for a couple of years before losing them.  I don't remember what we lost them to but I would love to try again.  I remember it being such a process, with the suit and smoker, etc.  and especially harvest time.  I find these hives to be incredibly intriguing. 

 

post #17685 of 18064
I'd never heard of a flow hive. Looks like a cool invention!
post #17686 of 18064

Thanks IG!  Awesome video.  I bet those frames don't come cheap, and perhaps are more appropriate for southern climates where frigid winter temps are not such an issue.  I'm totally blown away that it appears that the honey comes out of the FF apparently not needing any straining, and having no debris to be removed.

Ephesians 2:10  For we are his workmanship, created in Christ Jesus for good works, which God prepared beforehand, that we should walk in them.

 

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1013154/byc-member-interview-lazy-gardener

http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/yes-you-certainly-can-brood-chicks-outdoors

https://tikktok.wordpress.com/2014/04/13/fermented-feed-faq/

Reply

Ephesians 2:10  For we are his workmanship, created in Christ Jesus for good works, which God prepared beforehand, that we should walk in them.

 

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1013154/byc-member-interview-lazy-gardener

http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/yes-you-certainly-can-brood-chicks-outdoors

https://tikktok.wordpress.com/2014/04/13/fermented-feed-faq/

Reply
post #17687 of 18064

You're welcome!

 

I personally prefer the unfiltered honey but I love the non-invasiveness of harvesting from these flow hives.  They were developed by a father/son team in Australia.  I'm not sure how they'd hold up in our climate but here's the link to their site and I see they're also selling on sites like amazon now. 

 

 

https://www.honeyflow.com/?gclid=CJGS3MbH-9ACFcWFswodk1UC4Q


Edited by islandgirl82 - 12/17/16 at 7:45am
post #17688 of 18064
Quote:
Originally Posted by islandgirl82 View Post
 

You're welcome!

 

I personally prefer the unfiltered honey but I love the non-invasiveness of harvesting from these flow hives.  They were developed by a father/son team in Australia.  I'm not sure how they'd hold up in our climate but here's the link to their site and I see they're also selling on sites like amazon now. 

 

 

https://www.honeyflow.com/?gclid=CJGS3MbH-9ACFcWFswodk1UC4Q

its not as badly priced as i thought it would be (though still very expensive)

so cool!

post #17689 of 18064
Quote:
Originally Posted by DwayneNLiz View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by islandgirl82 View Post
 

You're welcome!

 

I personally prefer the unfiltered honey but I love the non-invasiveness of harvesting from these flow hives.  They were developed by a father/son team in Australia.  I'm not sure how they'd hold up in our climate but here's the link to their site and I see they're also selling on sites like amazon now. 

 

 

https://www.honeyflow.com/?gclid=CJGS3MbH-9ACFcWFswodk1UC4Q

its not as badly priced as i thought it would be (though still very expensive)

so cool!


​I may be wrong (I only looked quickly) but I think the prices are lower on the third party sites instead of buying direct and it would seem that the difference would pay for itself in no time compared to the traditional harvesting method. 

post #17690 of 18064

Hows every one doing with the cold weather we had, my girls did good but think I need to close up a few eve vents there are 16 vents ( 8 front, 8 back) and loosing any heat the girls may be putting out. it is not drafty just a lot of heat loss. Been getting good egg production 4-6 most days (14 hens) got 9 eggs so far today, think the warm up and sun helped.

 

What do folk use to keep water thawed?

 

 I had to buy a heated water bowl, my 60 watt bulb in a cinder block only worked to about 15 deg F, I hate the bowl, I was going through 1 gallon of water every 2 days with the old system (as long as it was not frozen) but with the bowl it is 2 gallons a day for they kick so much junk in to it.

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