BackYard Chickens › BYC Forum › Raising BackYard Chickens › Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures › dog shaking, lethargic and foaming at the mouth slightly.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

dog shaking, lethargic and foaming at the mouth slightly. - Page 4  

post #31 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by motherof5boys1girl 

well i called the vet again, and they told me that they cant make any sort of arrangements but they did say that it sounds like he just ate something he shouldnt have and that we should make him puke it up. they also mentioned that he couldve eaten a toad which is very likely here especially with all the rain.


That is exactly what I was going to mention.  My dog has never actually eaten a toad (that I know of) but when she is playing with one and licks it she will foam at the mouth.  It's actually very funny to see... but if she ate one and started shaking from it, it would scare the tar out of me!

I hope it was only a toad, or two.  Maybe your dog keeps digging out because he has developed a addiction to toads. wink

Robin's brood = 1  wonderful husband, 4 handsome sons, 1 beautiful daughter, 14 chickens, 1 dog, 1 puppy, 2 rabbits, 3 gerbils, & 1 dwarf hamster... shew! 
<>< http://matthewmcgee.org/roman-rd.html  <><
<>< http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FsgwfliQoqg <><
<>< http://www.shorewoodbiblechurch.org/where.htm <><
Robin's brood = 1  wonderful husband, 4 handsome sons, 1 beautiful daughter, 14 chickens, 1 dog, 1 puppy, 2 rabbits, 3 gerbils, & 1 dwarf hamster... shew! 
<>< http://matthewmcgee.org/roman-rd.html  <><
<>< http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FsgwfliQoqg <><
<>< http://www.shorewoodbiblechurch.org/where.htm <><
post #32 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by motherof5boys1girl 

well i called the vet again, and they told me that they cant make any sort of arrangements but they did say that it sounds like he just ate something he shouldnt have and that we should make him puke it up. they also mentioned that he couldve eaten a toad which is very likely here especially with all the rain.


Did they give you any suggestions to make him regurgetate the substance? I would not know where to begin hu Sounds like they are not much help hmm   The first thing I thought of was antifreeze poisoning or something similar.  hugs

Me (Robin), my very patient and understanding Hubby whom I adore, my son, Bill, a German Shorthaired Pointer, nubian, lamancha, saanen, alpine and nigerian dwarf milk goats.
www.taylorfarmsdairygoats.webs.com

http://www.taylorfarmssoap.com

Me (Robin), my very patient and understanding Hubby whom I adore, my son, Bill, a German Shorthaired Pointer, nubian, lamancha, saanen, alpine and nigerian dwarf milk goats.
www.taylorfarmsdairygoats.webs.com

http://www.taylorfarmssoap.com

post #33 of 53

Either syrup of ipecac or a few tablespoon fulls of hydrogen peroxide will make a dog barf.  We tend to keep both, some dogs are harder to make swallow than others and you use less ipecac.

We also keep liquid charcoal like the vet has for situations where we don't know what or when a dog ingested something suspicious.

Good luck.

It's German Shepherd Dog, they HERD, they don't Ard, don't Pard and don't Erd.    

Four or five Dogs, 2 retired horses lots of Chickens - Official Mad Hatcher; Cher

It's German Shepherd Dog, they HERD, they don't Ard, don't Pard and don't Erd.    

Four or five Dogs, 2 retired horses lots of Chickens - Official Mad Hatcher; Cher

post #34 of 53
Thread Starter 

i just gave him some peroxide and it seem to take effect pretty quick..while i was holding him i notice that his stomach is growling really bad!

wife to my highschool sweetheart for almost 18 years, mother to 6 boys and 1 girl.
wife to my highschool sweetheart for almost 18 years, mother to 6 boys and 1 girl.
post #35 of 53

I had a dog years ago same thing happen. Found he had gotten hold of a toad. He was a dashund so the toad was to big for him to eat. But he got enough of it in his mouth to make him sick for a couple days.  Hope your pooch gets better soon.

Do chickens think rubber humans are funny?

Your thoughts become your words. Your words become your actions. Your actions become your habits. Your habits become your character and your character is everything.
Do chickens think rubber humans are funny?

Your thoughts become your words. Your words become your actions. Your actions become your habits. Your habits become your character and your character is everything.
post #36 of 53
Thread Starter 

well, hes outside..burping now!

wife to my highschool sweetheart for almost 18 years, mother to 6 boys and 1 girl.
wife to my highschool sweetheart for almost 18 years, mother to 6 boys and 1 girl.
post #37 of 53

Will your vet accept payments, because that doesn't sound good.

Married to my wonderful Hubby Bill, and we just welcomed a handsom son, Luke on May 13th 2011.
Married to my wonderful Hubby Bill, and we just welcomed a handsom son, Luke on May 13th 2011.
post #38 of 53

Is there any other vet that you could see?

I'm surprised that the vet went out on a limb and said that, "It's probably just something he ate" over the phone, about a dog they haven't physically seen who is shaking and drooling.

I worked at a vet once (only reception and kennel so this doesn't make me an expert on anything) and we accepted post-dated checks. Is there any other vet in your area?

Before I met my husband, he had a cocker die of being poisoned from eating a rat that had eaten poison. This is a terrible thing to experience - I wouldn't want you or your family to have to go through that. It it so hard to tell what could be causing it, but so many of the things that could cause that type of reaction are potentially fatal. And I have to very gently say that shaking, drooling and lethargy seem like a dire emergency to me, as in, your dog may well need timely help if there is going to be a chance for him.

post #39 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by mountaintopchicken 

Is there any other vet that you could see?

I'm surprised that the vet went out on a limb and said that, "It's probably just something he ate" over the phone, about a dog they haven't physically seen who is shaking and drooling.

I worked at a vet once (only reception and kennel so this doesn't make me an expert on anything) and we accepted post-dated checks. Is there any other vet in your area?

Before I met my husband, he had a cocker die of being poisoned from eating a rat that had eaten poison. This is a terrible thing to experience - I wouldn't want you or your family to have to go through that. It it so hard to tell what could be causing it, but so many of the things that could cause that type of reaction are potentially fatal. And I have to very gently say that shaking, drooling and lethargy seem like a dire emergency to me, as in, your dog may well need timely help if there is going to be a chance for him.


Ditto. After this I would switch vets, if you can.

Breeding & Exhibiting Quality Bearded Silkies
Sundown Silkies Website
Sundown Silkies Facebook Page
NPIP Certified & Proud Member of the American Silkie Bantam Club & the American Bantam Association

PM or email if your interested in birds/eggs.

Breeding & Exhibiting Quality Bearded Silkies
Sundown Silkies Website
Sundown Silkies Facebook Page
NPIP Certified & Proud Member of the American Silkie Bantam Club & the American Bantam Association

PM or email if your interested in birds/eggs.

post #40 of 53

No matter what the outcome is for the dog, I would find another vet.  Most vets will make arrangements in an emergency. 

Things like this make me very thankful that I bought a very cheap health insurance policy for Leo, my Lhasa Apso.  It's cheap, and it has paid off for us.  It even pays for his teeth cleaning.  When Leo had his first seizure, the insurance paid for a lot of tests, brain scans, eeg, etc.  He was able to go to a doggie neurologist and be diagnosed with a rare case of adult onset hydrocephalus.  It was possibly a result of a reaction to a distemper shot, genetic, or an inapparent injury.  We will never know for sure.  It is very difficult to watch him have a seizure. 

If you ever witness a dog having any kind of seizure, do NOT put your face or hands near their mouth, keep children away and keep other pets away.  During a seizure the animal's senses are disrupted.  They may not be able to recognize friendly faces, and they are afraid.  They might bite in fear or be attacked by another pet because they are acting strangely.  If your dog is having a grand mal seizure (those are the big ones where they loose all body control), gently talk to the dog and stroke it (but not near the face).  If you have quick access to one of those flexible ice packs, hold it on the dogs back just in front of the tail.  During a grand mal seizure the victim uses a lot of energy and his/her temperature rises.  The ice lessens the stress on the body.  Only put the ice pack on the back right in front of the tail.  The skin in other areas may be too sensitive or it may be too shocking.  Studies done by vets have indicated that this is the best place.  When Leo has had seizures without the ice pack, he woke up blind and confused.  He wouldn't even respond to his name.  He was blind for 5 minutes, and took at least a half an hour for him to seem to know who or where he was.  With the ice, Leo has no blindness and is only confused for a few minutes.

Sorry if this has gone off topic, but if the dog continues to have seizures they may get worse and the info might come in handy to the OP or other owners of dogs with seizures.

In every fat person there may be a skinny one screaming to get out, but in every skinny person there is a fat one screaming to be fed!
In every fat person there may be a skinny one screaming to get out, but in every skinny person there is a fat one screaming to be fed!
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
This thread is locked  
BackYard Chickens › BYC Forum › Raising BackYard Chickens › Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures › dog shaking, lethargic and foaming at the mouth slightly.