New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Fluid buildup in hens abdomen - Page 2

post #11 of 19

I have a hen who is healthy in all other respects and lays a large brown egg daily - she is a 2 year old Black Sex Link - but, she too filled with water and got so big she nearly died, couldn't walk.  The first time I drained her I got a cup full of clear water out of her and she continued leaking on her own and soaked (sopping wet) two folded towel.  After that, she was back to running around the farm.  I had to drain her again in about 3 months (again clear fluid) but made sure I did it before she got too big.  Then a third time in another 3 months that time slightly yellow watery fluid.  Now it's been several months and I haven't had to drain her again.  I have no idea what caused it but she's active and still lays daily.

post #12 of 19

I have a hen suffering from the same thing- ascites. She is spitting up water but hasn't completely lost her appetite. Could someone walk me through the draining with a syringe process. Does it matter where I poke her? Thanks for the help.

post #13 of 19

jacalyn483, if it is ascites (spitting up water?):  On her belly (ventral), bevel of needle toward the skin on insertion (`dull' side up, so to speak)  at as shallow an angle as possible (you want to avoid internal organs).  Try to find a 14/16 ga. needle at the feed store.  The fluid should drain of its own accord without having to aspirate with a syringe (but have one on  hand). 

As has been observed:  Ascites is a sign/symptom of a disease process.  Sometimes treating the fluid buildup is sufficient to improve quality of life, sometimes not.

Below is a rather detailed listing of various causes (avian vet handbook - everyone should be set up for larparotomies, yes?  sad  ).

http://www.avianmedicine.net/ampa/19.pdf  (starts at page 515).

Good luck!

post #14 of 19
Thread Starter 

Looks like I'm going to lose Agatha inspite of my efforts.

She has stopped eating.

"Yeah...Here comes the Rooster..."  - Alice in chains
http://www.backyardchickens.com/web/viewblog.php?id=2588-Roo_behavior
Reply
"Yeah...Here comes the Rooster..."  - Alice in chains
http://www.backyardchickens.com/web/viewblog.php?id=2588-Roo_behavior
Reply
post #15 of 19
Thread Starter 

We lost her today.

"Yeah...Here comes the Rooster..."  - Alice in chains
http://www.backyardchickens.com/web/viewblog.php?id=2588-Roo_behavior
Reply
"Yeah...Here comes the Rooster..."  - Alice in chains
http://www.backyardchickens.com/web/viewblog.php?id=2588-Roo_behavior
Reply
post #16 of 19

I am so sorry for your loss.  We lost two hens to the same thing last year.  It was a reproductive issue and, combined with a bad bout with ILT, was too much for them.  Now I check all the hens regularly to make sure there is no fluid or mass buildup.  Best, Lynn

post #17 of 19

I am so sorry you lost her but at least you tried to save her and did  your best.

post #18 of 19

Sorry, Red.

post #19 of 19

Glenda Heywood

I looked up the article on  Ascites

it is a disease of the heart in fast growing birds

NOT AT ALL WITH THE LIQUID ACCUMULAION IN THE HENS BODY

http://www.thepoultrysite.com/articles/500/understanding-and-controlling-ascites/

 

Factors that Trigger Pulmonary Hypertension and Ascites

Ascites mortality tends to be highest in the fastest growing flocks, and that incidence can be lowered by any strategy that slightly slows the overall flock growth rate. This slightly slower growth rate reduces the demand on the heart, pulmonary hypertension and ascites. The incidence of ascites increases whenever broilers are exposed to cool temperatures. Cool temperatures increase cardiac output since the bird’s metabolic rate must increase to meet the demand for body heat production. Exposing broilers to low oxygen immediately triggers an increase in pulmonary arterial pressure since the efficiency of respiratory process is reduced. When birds are chronically exposed to low oxygen levels, it tend to lead to a high incidence of ascites. The respiratory damage associated with disease, dust, or poor air quality can reduce respiratory efficiency. In addition, these conditions can partially obstruct the airways, reduce the number of vascular channels available for blood flow, thereby reducing blood oxygen, increasing pulmonary vascular resistance and pulmonary arterial pressure, and causing ascites in broilers.

Lowering the Odds of for Pulmonary Hypertension and Ascites

In contrast to the known triggers for ascites outlined above, the incidence of ascites can be lowered by any strategy that reduces the metabolic demand for oxygen and thus reduces cardiac output. Slightly restricting broiler growth rates and providing thermoneutral temperatures fall into this category. The incidence of ascites also can be reduced by treatments that reduce pulmonary vascular resistance by dilating the pulmonary vasculature. Although a number of chemical are capable of reducing pulmonary vascular resistance, none are approved for use in birds destined for human consumption. However, the amino acid arginine is utilized by cells lining the pulmonary blood vessels to facilitate pulmonary vascular dilation during high pressure and flow conditions. Our research has shown that adding supplemental arginine to broiler diets effectively reduces pulmonary vascular resistance and the incidence of ascites in broilers exposed to cool temperatures. Nonetheless, it is important to remember that increased use dietary arginine have been shown to influence lysine requirements.

Conclusion

Broilers susceptible to ascites are capable of outgrowing the capacity of their lungs to oxygenate blood. Factors that increase oxygen demand include: exposure to cool temperatures, low oxygen levels, and respiratory damage associate with disease, dust or poor air quality. Pulmonary hypertension and ascites in modern broiler strains may be reduced by any strategy that reduces the metabolic demand for oxygen and thus reduces cardiac output. Slight restrictions in broiler growth and providing a thermoneutral environment are two strategies that work.

Further Information

This article was largely abstracted from a 1999 Hubbard Farms Technical Report by R. F. Wideman (“Understanding pulmonary hypertension syndrome (ascites)”). This article is published with the permission of the author and Hubbard Farms.

29-1/2 years Editor- Publisher of

NATIONAL POULTRY NEWS

OVER 60 YEARS RAISING

CHICKENS and ducks 

Reply

29-1/2 years Editor- Publisher of

NATIONAL POULTRY NEWS

OVER 60 YEARS RAISING

CHICKENS and ducks 

Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home