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How do you deworm a chicken and how often is one suppose to do that?

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 

I had not heard of that until a few minutes ago.

Anyone?

Thank you!

post #2 of 17

You can de-worm by using a wormer such as Ivermectin (there are several to choose from).  Wormers can be administered in water, orally or topically.  1-2 times a year is optimal, depending on your climate.  Our vet recommends that a second worming (with a different wormer) follow 10 days after the initial worming to make sure all the worms and parasites have been purged.  Some people use natural treatments, such as DE, as a preventative.  Cheers, Lynn

post #3 of 17

here is the whole nine yards ON WORMING
DIFFERENT METHODS
AND i USUALLY WORMED IN LATE FALL AS THEY WERE MOLTING AND NOT LAYING EGGS AND THEN THEY CAN BE WORMED GOOD

wazine first for round worms then 10 days later
second worming with either ivermectin usually says for cattle 1% is water soluable and 5% is oil based and only dropped on the neck skin by amt of drops listed for size of chicken

or you can use cayenne pepper at rate of 3 tbsp of cayenne pepper to a gallon of feed. this is fed daily for life of chicken

or 2 parts DE to 10 parts of feed daily to the chickens for life of chickens
any questions just email me

DIFFERENT TYPES OF WORMING
Read all this carefully and decide what is your best plan of doing the worming
the 5% drop on is time consuming but the best over all method in my opinion
Nathalie Ross discusses this on her spot here
Glenda L Heywood Brookings SD   
http://www.gkpet.com 
click on pet forum for articles on poultry 
frizzlebird7@yahoo.com   




HERE IS SOME ANSWERS TO USING WAZINE FOR ROUND WORMS AND iVERMECTIN FOR THE OTHERS AND LICE AND MITES 
try reading and answering most of your questions on usine   
wazine or peperzine for round worms 
and Ivermectin 1% water soluble or 5% oil based 
ANY QUESTIONS EMAIL THEM TO ME 
Glenda L Heywood 
 
ANSWER 
my friend Pam Hogan gives this info on using Ivermetin 1% water soluble 
 
Dr. Ron Dickey, of Rogue River Veterinary Hospital, gave us the     
following formula for worming with Ivomec, which is safe to use on     
any bird, because it goes by the weight of the bird.     
   
Use only 1% injectible cattle formula of Ivomecnot the pour-on.     
   
Dilute the Ivomec 10 fold. Use 9 parts water or propylene glycol to     
1 part 1% Ivomec. Use .1cc per lb. of body weight. For smaller     
birds, dilute 20/1 and use 1cc per lb. of body weight.     
   
If you are using water, Ivomec is not stable in water, so you have     
to keep shaking it well before you draw a dosage. Ivomec is stable     
in propylene glycol, and it works much better. You can buy a big     
jug of it at most feedstores/farm suppliesit is used for pregnant     
sheep, goats and cattle.     
   
Ivomec is effective against internal parasites like trachea worm,     
and also takes care of the external parasites. Levasole gets the     
capillary worms and some others that the Ivomec doesn't get.     
Pam Hogan     
 
ANSWER 
My friend Randy Henry did a lot of study on worming in his 17 yrs study on Veterinary 
here is some of his usage of Ivermectin 1% soluble and 5% oil based 
 
Also severl people use Ivomec wormer 1% water soluble     
or 5% oil based and put on the neck skin of the bird.   
 
Injectable 1% is     
used inside the bird in injection or in the water also given down the throat 
. And     
5% oil based is used on the shoulder of the bird only. Not inside the birds mouth.     
     
Directions for 5% ivomec with oil base put on shoulder     
only not internally.     
(1 1 drop small bantam such as female OE     
(2 2 drops large bantam male like OE     
(3 3 drops most bantams     
(4 4 drops larger bantams and smaller commercial hens     
(5 5 drops commercial large fowl and smaller large     
fowl     
(5 5 drops Large fowl chicken     
(7 7 drops larger males of large fowl breeds of     
Chickens.     
     
(A 5% oil type Ivomec Stays on the birds for at least     
6 weeks. and is the reason it is only used on the out     
side under the feathers on the shoulder of the     
chickens. Slow release time.     
     
(B 1% water soulable is injectable and can be used in     
the water.   also given by mouth 
 
THIS AND IS ON USING 1% IVERMECTIN IN THE WATER 
WHICH IS NOT MY PREFERRED USE OF IT???? 
you have to treat 4 times a yr GLH 
 
"   
Iona wrote:   
I leave treated water (4 cc per gallon of water) in the coops for 2   
days.  It is the only water so everyone drinks.  I change the water   
mixture every day and more often if it gets dirty. There is a great   
margin for safety when using ivermectin so I don't worry about a bird   
over dosing on it. I have been using injectable ivermectin mixed with   
drinking water for 5 years now and have never had a problem.   
   
GAIL
I use the injectable 1 % solution mixed at 8 cc. per gallon of water to   
treat canaries for air sac mites and to worm chickens, budgies,   
canaries, cockatiels, etc. I take their water away the night before and   
use this solution as the only source of water for 24 hours. It is   
important to treat again in 10 days to get all the mites that have   
hatched out since the treatment BEFORE they can lay eggs again. For   
scaly face/leg mites I treat the birds at least four times.   
To prevent heart worms and treat round and hook worms in dogs I use the   
same 1% injectable diluted 14 cc. of ivermectin to 86 cc of propylene   
glycol, administered orally once a month at a dosage rate of 1 cc for   
every ten pounds body weight. This works very well for me, although I   
would use caution in giving ivermectin to collies or collie crosses. I   
have not had any problem with shetland sheepdogs or border collies, but   
your results may vary.   
   
Gail   
 
ANSWER 
My friend Nathalie Ross "threehorses" answered this on the   
use of Ivermectin 5% put on the neck skin of the bird not on the feathers 
 
 
Here is the low down on Ivermectin and epernix   
Ivermectin does take 10 days not eating the eggsepernix is no with drawel time   
   
Here is some information on the use of Ivemectin Products. I just wanted to help you out a little here.   
From Nathalie Ross a friend of mine   
   
First, despite what people advise, any pour on   
ivermectin product shouldn't be used in     
water.  It's designed to be weatherproof for cattle and soak into external skin.  It also needs to be given in a precise dosage so that you're getting what you pay for.   
   
Both Ivermectin pour on and Eprinex-   
Ivomec pour on are used the same, tho some people use Eprinex at a higher dosage with sucess.  Eprinex of course is the 0 withdrawal product by Ivomec.   
   
If you go with Ivermectin injectable, you'll also need   
to buy propylene glycol to use with the injectable.  By the time you do this, you've spent the same amount of money as the pour on with what I feel isn't the same level of effectiveness honestly, but some     
people have access to injectable and not pour on so   
it's an option.   
   
For the pour on (5% oil) Ivermectin (not Eprinex) the dosage I   
use is as follows:   
1 drop - OEGB sized small bantam female   
2 drops - OEGB sized small bantam male   
3 drops - average bantams   
4 drops - large bantams, small commercial fowl   
5 drops - most commercial fowl, small giant hens   
6 drops - giant breeds of chicken   
   
I always use a 3 cc syringe that I just fill to about 2 cc's with a 20 gauge needle.  The needle WON'T be injected into the chicken, but does make it easier to dispense a controlled correct sized drop.  It also is easier to get in there between the feathers.   
   
For location, you'll want to find an easy to reach   
spot with as little fluff as possible. I've had the   
best luck with the back of the neck when I am by myself.  I just pick up the chicken in my left     
hand, ruffle around the feathers with my right hand until I find a nice clear spot, then rotate the syringe around to dispense the drops exactly on the skin.   
   
If you hit the fluff, it will soak in before     
you can do anything and will be wasted.  That stuff soaks in like lightening (which I discovered to my horror when I accidently got about 1 cc of it on me from the bottle - I'm worm free now!)   
   
While you have the bird up, look them over.  This is a great opportunity to nip things in the bud!  Take advantage of it.   
   
Generally I like to recommend that first time wormers use Piperazine (Wazine being the most common brand) before using Ivermectin the first time.  This is a common practice with most livestockmen and women.   
   
You use a less effective, less broad spectrum wormer first just in case there's a high load of roundworms.  If there is a high load of roundworms and they're all killed at once, you risk either impaction or the bird having a reaction to the foreign proteins that the dead/stunned worms become.   
   
The best way in my opinion of doing this is to worm with Piperazine in the water first - full strength 24 hours, then instead of following up in 10 days with piperazine, use the Ivomec Ivermectin or better yet Ivomec eprinex (for 0 withdrawal time).   
   
Using this program, I worm once a year.  Once I have wormed with ivermectin, I don't use piperazine again unless I do a second worming during the year or have   
reason to suspect they've encountered a heavy level of parasites.  In fact, I worm once a year almost exclusively.     
I use tramisol as my second wormer if I have to (which is rare for me, even her in parasite ridden Texas).   
   
Some people like to use a daily preventative like DE   
between wormings.  Some confusion comes when people call DE (Diatomaceous Earth) a wormer; it's not.  It's an aid to preventing small dosages of worms, the small batches that your birds will pick up daily.  It's  not good at killing larger batches of worms however.     
   
BUT it's natural and, if you use the codex food grade DE, it's quite effective and can even be spread in the bedding and on the birds to help ward off mites and feather lice.     
   
It won't hurt anything if the other  animals pick it up, either.  You just use it less than   
2% in your feed, or in the free choice box for your usual oyster shell, etc.   
   
I hope this has helped you to understand a little   
about ivermectin and how to get the most out of it.     
It's a super wormer and will do     
right by you if you keep its proper use and design in mind!     
   
Good luck with your flocks!   
Nathalie Ross, Houston, TX


Edited by Glenda L Heywood - 6/21/09 at 1:14pm
Glenda L Heywood Brookings SD
frizzlebird7@yahoo.com
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Glenda L Heywood Brookings SD
frizzlebird7@yahoo.com
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post #4 of 17

I definitely agree with using Wazine first and then following up 2 weeks later with ivermectin.  That's the standard way of worming, first time, if you have an adult flock with not much worming history.

By the way, don't substitute piperazine for pets. 

I use Wazine 17 (piperazine 17% solution) one day.  Withdraw meat and eggs for 2 weeks.  Then use ivermectin drop-on between the should blades.  It only takes 1-5 drops depending on the size of the bird.

You don't want to use ivermectin, the stronger more broad spectrum wormer, first for possibility of killing your birds with shock if they have a heavy parasite load that you don't know about.

Wazine is a pretty gentle wormer that usually has to be repeated 2-3 times - that's why we WANT to use it.  Killing all the worms at once can shock the bird into death, or clog their vents and kill them.  So use the weaker wormer first.

Then I worm twice yearly with ivermectin.

By the way, any time you worm, always follow up by using a probiotic (living bacteria) for a week thereafter to counteract stress.  Yogurt, acidophilus tablets, prepared live-bacteria probiotics from the feedstore:  all of  those will work.  If you use the feedstore kind, make sure the label says "CFU" with some numbers on it somewhere.  It shouldn't just contain byproducts or fermentation products, but actual colony forming units of bacteria.  smile

Nathalie Ross  threehorses@horsemail.com
(http://hoovesandfeathers.homestead.com/index.html in progress)
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Nathalie Ross  threehorses@horsemail.com
(http://hoovesandfeathers.homestead.com/index.html in progress)
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post #5 of 17

So I think one of my gals may have gapeworm- For the last 2-3 days I have noticed her shaking her head a lot.  She's been trilling grumpily every time I go near her I am hearing this grrrrrrr (I thought she was just peeved at me but with the head shake and scratching at her head...) and has a gurgly scream when I pick her up (normally she squwaks!)

Yesterday afternoon she sat in her normal laying corner, near the feed, and ate sitting down frmo her corner-  This am I picked her up and put her outside the coop and she sat for a while in place before free ranging a bit- all the while shaking her head and gggrrrrr grumpily trilling...

Full disclosure- I am more paranoid than normal as I had a hen up and die on Saturday and I hadn't noticed a darn thing wrong with her...

My gals have never been wormed- If I have gapeworm here do I go straight to Ivermectin?  Do I do Wazine for all the gals and then if this one gets critical use the Ivermectin for her directly even if it is less than 10-14 days after the Wazine?

I have "Endo-mectin Ivermectin 1% Sterile Solution Injection for cattle and swine" here... and Wazine, and food grade DE......

Thank you for any advice!

Happy with Hens since 2009!
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Happy with Hens since 2009!
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post #6 of 17

So I did the wazine bout 12 days ago-  I am ready with the Ivermectin to follow up now-

From the posts above:


"(B 1% water soulable is injectable and can be used in     
the water.   also given by mouth 
 
THIS AND IS ON USING 1% IVERMECTIN IN THE WATER 
WHICH IS NOT MY PREFERRED USE OF IT???? 
you have to treat 4 times a yr GLH 
 
"   
Iona wrote:   
I leave treated water (4 cc per gallon of water) in the coops for 2   
days.  It is the only water so everyone drinks.  I change the water   
mixture every day and more often if it gets dirty. There is a great   
margin for safety when using ivermectin so I don't worry about a bird   
over dosing on it. I have been using injectable ivermectin mixed with   
drinking water for 5 years now and have never had a problem.   
   
GAIL
I use the injectable 1 % solution mixed at 8 cc. per gallon of water to   
treat canaries for air sac mites and to worm chickens, budgies,   
canaries, cockatiels, etc. I take their water away the night before and   
use this solution as the only source of water for 24 hours. It is   
important to treat again in 10 days to get all the mites that have   
hatched out since the treatment BEFORE they can lay eggs again. For   
scaly face/leg mites I treat the birds at least four times.   
To prevent heart worms and treat round and hook worms in dogs I use the   
same 1% injectable diluted 14 cc. of ivermectin to 86 cc of propylene   
glycol, administered orally once a month at a dosage rate of 1 cc for   
every ten pounds body weight. This works very well for me, although I   
would use caution in giving ivermectin to collies or collie crosses. I   
have not had any problem with shetland sheepdogs or border collies, but   
your results may vary.   "


So which dose do I use?  4cc per gallon?  8cc per gallon?  Do I leave it in the waterer for 1 or 2 days?

Appreciate any advice!

Happy with Hens since 2009!
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Happy with Hens since 2009!
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post #7 of 17

OK, I bought some Wazine from my local feed store.  I just don't know when to worm them. They are 6 months old now and all are starting to lay.  I read that you should throw out the eggs for 2 weeks.??  Also, I seen you can use Cayanne Pepper and Ivermectin?  Please Help.idunno

post #8 of 17

X2. What is the dose per gallon of water for big stock?

Quote:
Originally Posted by OrpingtonHopeful 

So I did the wazine bout 12 days ago-  I am ready with the Ivermectin to follow up now-

From the posts above:


"(B 1% water soulable is injectable and can be used in     
the water.   also given by mouth 
 
THIS AND IS ON USING 1% IVERMECTIN IN THE WATER 
WHICH IS NOT MY PREFERRED USE OF IT???? 
you have to treat 4 times a yr GLH 
 
"   
Iona wrote:   
I leave treated water (4 cc per gallon of water) in the coops for 2   
days.  It is the only water so everyone drinks.  I change the water   
mixture every day and more often if it gets dirty. There is a great   
margin for safety when using ivermectin so I don't worry about a bird   
over dosing on it. I have been using injectable ivermectin mixed with   
drinking water for 5 years now and have never had a problem.   
   
GAIL
I use the injectable 1 % solution mixed at 8 cc. per gallon of water to   
treat canaries for air sac mites and to worm chickens, budgies,   
canaries, cockatiels, etc. I take their water away the night before and   
use this solution as the only source of water for 24 hours. It is   
important to treat again in 10 days to get all the mites that have   
hatched out since the treatment BEFORE they can lay eggs again. For   
scaly face/leg mites I treat the birds at least four times.   
To prevent heart worms and treat round and hook worms in dogs I use the   
same 1% injectable diluted 14 cc. of ivermectin to 86 cc of propylene   
glycol, administered orally once a month at a dosage rate of 1 cc for   
every ten pounds body weight. This works very well for me, although I   
would use caution in giving ivermectin to collies or collie crosses. I   
have not had any problem with shetland sheepdogs or border collies, but   
your results may vary.   "


So which dose do I use?  4cc per gallon?  8cc per gallon?  Do I leave it in the waterer for 1 or 2 days?

Appreciate any advice!

Born & Bred in East TN., Messin around with our Hot Rods, Raising our chickens with my Son, One deaf Blue Heeler, Two inside cats, a Brooder full of Chicks, a Bator full of eggs & a yard full of happy CHICKENS!
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Born & Bred in East TN., Messin around with our Hot Rods, Raising our chickens with my Son, One deaf Blue Heeler, Two inside cats, a Brooder full of Chicks, a Bator full of eggs & a yard full of happy CHICKENS!
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post #9 of 17

I've read several posts on the forum from people who have never wormed and have not had a problem.

Owned by two old dogs (yellow lab and a big, red, fuzzy mutt) and four chickens (Buff Orpington, Barred Rock, and two Easter Eggers)
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Owned by two old dogs (yellow lab and a big, red, fuzzy mutt) and four chickens (Buff Orpington, Barred Rock, and two Easter Eggers)
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post #10 of 17

You cannot use injectable ivermectin in water. It's in a solution of glycol and does not dissolve in water. It also doesn't work super well on chicken internal worms. Great for lice and mites.

There is no such thing as 5% ivermectin unless you found it specially compounded somewhere. Ivomec pour-on is 0.5% ivermectin, which I guess is what's being referred to, but do not go looking for (and if you find it do not buy) 5% ivermectin.

Honestly, I do not know why Wazine is considered a good first wormer except that maybe it's so easily available and says chicken on the front. Piperazine has a very long withdrawal time and can produce nasty neurological side effects if humans or mammals ingest too much. Not something you want to keep under your kitchen sink, for sure.

You can use albendazole, 10-20 mg/kg (between a quarter and a half a ml per five pounds if you buy brand-name Valbazen), as a sole wormer. No need to use wazine first and it's safe for humans and other animals if they accidentally ingest it.

You can use fenbendazole, 10-20 mg/kg (between a tenth and a fifth of a ml per five pounds if you buy brand-name Safeguard goat) as a sole wormer.

You can use pyrantel pamoate, 10-20 mg/kg (get the dog liquid, which is marketed as Strongid, Nemex, and a bunch of others, and use between 1x and 2x the dog dose) as a first wormer; it removes roundworms only and is very gentle. Follow up with one of the others.

I don't know how true the theory of harmful die-off is, to be honest. It happens in heartworm in dogs when the arsenic treatment is given - that's real - but gut worms don't behave the same way. When Merial researches ivermectin to see if it works on cows they don't gently worm with something first. They stuff the cows with a huge worm load and then blast them with ivermectin. The cows don't die, they just get better. When you look at the research establishing the dosage of the drugs above, they're not using Wazine first. They just dose the birds and expect them to do well. None of the wormers on the market today actually kill worms; they paralyze them or interfere with their metabolism and the worms die off from starvation and paralysis. So no wormer is going to produce the instantaneous and massive die-off that supposedly chokes digestion. I wouldn't worry too much about that, but if you want to be super safe start with pyrantel.

Joanna Kimball
Show breeder of Cardigan Welsh Corgis. Also featuring a Tibetan Spaniel, a Papillon, and various rescue dogs. NPIP in New Hampshire; working on LF and bantam projects. The incubators are always running! 

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Joanna Kimball
Show breeder of Cardigan Welsh Corgis. Also featuring a Tibetan Spaniel, a Papillon, and various rescue dogs. NPIP in New Hampshire; working on LF and bantam projects. The incubators are always running! 

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