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Why do hens lay eggs without roosters? - Page 2

post #11 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by WalkingWolf 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Anny 

All birds can lay eggs with out a man around. The bodies job is to reproduce, even if there is no rooster around, the body still does what it knows it's supposed to do, make the egg.

If you think about it people lay eggs with out being fertile. We women bleed every month to release the egg that was not fertile. But since we are mammals and not birds we do it a little differently. And our eggs are very very tiny. I know it's gross to think about.


Parrots do not usually lay eggs unless they are mating. I don't know why but I had some parrots that would not lay even with a mate. Parrots are one of the few animals that must make an emotional bond before mating and maybe this is necessary for ovulation.


That's interesting.  Do parrots mate for life?  I wonder how this applies to monogamous species that mate for life and lose their mate.  Do the females stop ovulating if they lose their male partner?  Anyone know?

post #12 of 17
Thread Starter 

You all are so funny!
I will definitely post the article when it comes out. It is basically about how in love with my chickesn I am and how I think everyone should have chickens!

Anyway, in the article, I talk about how I always get asked this question: how can chickens lay eggs without a rooster around? (I also mention the follow-up question: "so... how do the roosters fertilize the eggs?")

But the editor of the newsletter wants more explanation. I know that females of many species have lots of unfertilized eggs inside/our their bodies, but most species don't produce the eggs unless they're fertilized. Um, right? (just guessing here).

I was assuming it was a domestic animal thing. I THINK (again, just guessing here) that wild birds don't have the luxury of laying eggs most of the year. It probably takes a lot of energy to produce an egg. So I just thought it was domestic fowl....?

1 dh, two awesome animal-loving kids, 1 junkyard dog, 1 former stray cat, 4 bantam buff brahma hens, 1 bantam EE hen, 1 bantam EE rooster, 1 mongrel rooster, a slaughterhouse-rescue Silkie... and 2 chicks hatched by the silkie!
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1 dh, two awesome animal-loving kids, 1 junkyard dog, 1 former stray cat, 4 bantam buff brahma hens, 1 bantam EE hen, 1 bantam EE rooster, 1 mongrel rooster, a slaughterhouse-rescue Silkie... and 2 chicks hatched by the silkie!
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post #13 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by City Gardener 

But the editor of the newsletter wants more explanation. I know that females of many species have lots of unfertilized eggs inside/our their bodies, but most species don't produce the eggs unless they're fertilized. Um, right? (just guessing here).


Wrong.  Most species do produce eggs, but they are too tiny to see.

post #14 of 17

Just guessing here, but I would imagine that domestic fowl have been bred, over centuries, to enhance egg production, too. 

Interesting thread!

Alison

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Alison

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post #15 of 17

Here's a thread that started out really funny, but broke down towards the end when a couple of people took offense, but it is interesting reading.

http://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/viewtopic.php?id=187526

post #16 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by gritsar 

Cats and dogs go into heat without the male around too.  'Course they're not in heat long before the male shows up, but still.....


I might be wrong here, but I thinks some species (dogs, cats, horses) go into heat and have to be bred before the egg is released.

I'm too lazy to look it up; I'll leave that to someone else.

post #17 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by cassie 

For the same reason nuns have periods. In most species ovulation has nothing to do with having a male around.


yuckyucklau

The silence that guards the tomb does not reveal God's secret in the obscurity of the coffin, and the rustling of the branches whose roots suck the body's elements do not tell the mysteries of the grave, by the agonized sighs of my heart announce to the living the drama which love, beauty, and death have performed.
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The silence that guards the tomb does not reveal God's secret in the obscurity of the coffin, and the rustling of the branches whose roots suck the body's elements do not tell the mysteries of the grave, by the agonized sighs of my heart announce to the living the drama which love, beauty, and death have performed.
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