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How to caponize a rooster Warning Graphic pics - Page 2  

post #11 of 255
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by insiderart 

Wow very interesting!!  I never knew that caponizing was totally internal surgery!

Do you hypnotize them first?  No sedative or local anaesthetic?  Do you worry about sterilizing your instruments?


I don't know how to hypnotize and I did not use anaesthetic of any kind!  I know that the bird feels some pain but I have no idea how much.  I just think that I am giving roosters a better life than to be destroyed at the hatchery as an unwanted chick.
I clean the instruments with alcohol and paper towels the best I can.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve_of_sandspoultry 

did you leave some "un caponized" to compare? I would be very interested in the overall size and growth difference.

Steve in NC


I did not leave any intact roosters but that is a good idea to try someday.

Proverbs 1:7 The fear of the LORD is the beginning of knowledge ; Fools despise wisdom and instruction.

I'll Keep My Religion, My Guns, My Liberty, and My Money. KEEP YOUR CHANGE!
Proverbs 1:7 The fear of the LORD is the beginning of knowledge ; Fools despise wisdom and instruction.

I'll Keep My Religion, My Guns, My Liberty, and My Money. KEEP YOUR CHANGE!
post #12 of 255

Dumb question here... Why? Are they pets? Obviously they can't fertilize eggs, do you use them as meat birds? Just curious..

Grrrrr!!!!
Grrrrr!!!!
post #13 of 255

Thanks so much Wisdom Seeker.  Looks very similar to my experiences.  I would love to see a pic showing the location of both testes from one side.  I have never sucessfully been able to remove both from one side.  Also, I've never had the skin heal over in one week unless I used stitches.  It would always be this quarter sized scab that would crack and ooze for quite a while, and often become infected, so now I just take the extra time to stitch.  It saves me infection draining time later.  Stitches come out at 1 week when the birds go back outside, and they do good.  I have had some get air puffs, which I then puncture daily with a scapel for about another week at which point it stops puffing up.  I've always used the spreader from the beginning, and I think it puts a lot of strain on the bird's ribs, so I think I will try it your way next time and not use the spreader until the very end. 

I have 4 in the starve cage now, will be ready for surgury tomorrow morning.

Farming in the City
Farming in the City
post #14 of 255
Quote:
Originally Posted by dipence71 

Dumb question here... Why? Are they pets? Obviously they can't fertilize eggs, do you use them as meat birds? Just curious..


Caponizing means tender flesh. The bird doesn't get grossly large, as some will tell you, but their flesh is more tender than an uncaponized bird.

With the sex glands removed there is no testosterone, so no fibrous muscle tissue develops - thus a tender, succulent bird results. They are also calmer, quieter birds, resembling something like an overgrow hen...

They are normally held for a longer time than other meat birds, on the order of 20-24 weeks. Average weights are in the 8-12 lb. range. Think small turkey and you get the idea. Once you get good at it, it is indeed a great way to utilize spare males that might otherwise be destroyed.

In the old days it was a common practice and there were men who made their wage, in season, doing it.

There was, in fact, a particular specialty market for them, mostly among immigrant populations. They commanded a premium price, especially in the Northeast.

The passing of the old world immigrant populations and development of fast growing meat birds (in particular the "roasting hen") eliminated the market for capons and thus their profitability. There are only a few large producers of them any more.


Edited by Davaroo - 7/6/09 at 3:04pm

Peace... David
"Poetry often comes in through the window of irrelevance"

 

Peace... David
"Poetry often comes in through the window of irrelevance"

 

post #15 of 255

Here is a fact sheet for some people who were wondering why people caponize

http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/PS051


http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-a-capon.htm


AND

While looking this up I came across this tidbit on wikipedia



....Capons are also used as broodys. When the testes are removed, the male instinct disappears, letting the "mothering" instincts show. Capons are popular as broodys because they are not as aggressive as hens are......


Has anyone heard of this?   Would they be broody all the time?

I might start a separate thread on this.

post #16 of 255
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rootball 

Here is a fact sheet for some people who were wondering why people caponize

http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/PS051


http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-a-capon.htm


AND

While looking this up I came across this tidbit on wikipedia



....Capons are also used as broodys. When the testes are removed, the male instinct disappears, letting the "mothering" instincts show. Capons are popular as broodys because they are not as aggressive as hens are......


Has anyone heard of this?   Would they be broody all the time?

I might start a separate thread on this.


Never heard of brood capons. But hey, why not?

Peace... David
"Poetry often comes in through the window of irrelevance"

 

Peace... David
"Poetry often comes in through the window of irrelevance"

 

post #17 of 255

yes I have heard that I am pretty sure it is true. there have been a few threads where those that do it have said they are great brooders, not for the sitting part per-say but for the raising part after hatch.

i am very eager to learn this.

Is it true they dont crow either?

Best darn kid in the world, and some great fowl too.
Best darn kid in the world, and some great fowl too.
post #18 of 255
Quote:
Originally Posted by AHappychick 

yes I have heard that I am pretty sure it is true. there have been a few threads where those that do it have said they are great brooders, not for the sitting part per-say but for the raising part after hatch.

i am very eager to learn this.

Is it true they dont crow either?


ah kind of like a heat lamp with legs.......or an old nutless uncle.

post #19 of 255
Quote:
Originally Posted by AHappychick 

yes I have heard that I am pretty sure it is true. there have been a few threads where those that do it have said they are great brooders, not for the sitting part per-say but for the raising part after hatch.

i am very eager to learn this.

Is it true they dont crow either?


Thats what they say....

Peace... David
"Poetry often comes in through the window of irrelevance"

 

Peace... David
"Poetry often comes in through the window of irrelevance"

 

post #20 of 255

Thank you for all the info I learn sooo much on here.

ya

Grrrrr!!!!
Grrrrr!!!!
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