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De-worming and Wazine Concern - Page 13

post #121 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by lorenwolf View Post

Thank you so much for the information on the application of either Panacur or Ivermectin Pour on.

Welcome to BYC!

-Kathy
post #122 of 127

Hi All -

 

So I found this with my 4 week old chicks yesterday...

 

 

 

 

Went to the feed store for more feed and to get some advice on what it could be. Showed the manager the picture, he recommended Wazine to deworm. The chicks are also still on medicated starter as well.

 

However, after getting home doing research on Wazine (mainly to figure out how to dose them, we only have 5 and the bottle gives the info for 100!), I am torn.

 

Would like some other opinions of this... thank you in advance!

post #123 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by ManfreChickens View Post
 

Hi All -

 

So I found this with my 4 week old chicks yesterday...

 

 

 

 

Went to the feed store for more feed and to get some advice on what it could be. Showed the manager the picture, he recommended Wazine to deworm. The chicks are also still on medicated starter as well.

 

However, after getting home doing research on Wazine (mainly to figure out how to dose them, we only have 5 and the bottle gives the info for 100!), I am torn.

 

Would like some other opinions of this... thank you in advance!

I think it's one ounce per gallon.

 

-Kathy

post #124 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by threehorses View Post


I rarely believe anything the feed stores say anymore, seriously.  For every one feed store guy that I've met that knows anything about poultry, I've met 100 that know nothing but act like they know everything.  It would be almost amusing if I didn't know that they're out there giving seriously harmful advice to people who just want to have healthy birds.


There are plenty of dewormers for poultry.  Labeled for poultry, and those not labeled but generally accepted and recommended by universities, much less the ones that are used privately.


So ignore The Feed Store Guy.  smile.png


For your twice yearly program, here's my recommendation.  It's what I've been using personally for over 10 years, more like 12.


I'm going to probably repeat myself here, but want to have all the information in one place.



OK first I determine whether or not a bird needs the wazine worming first, what I nicknamed the "wazine pre-worming".  Here are the qualifications.   If "yes" to any of these, I do the wazine first:


Bird is over six months old, never wormed, and has been on dirt -  not wire.

Bird has an unknown worming history.

Bird has shed any worms in the feces at all.

Bird hasn't been wormed in over 9 months.



If the bird meets those qualifications, I use Wazine 17 (or equivalent piperazine 17%) as labeled in their water for 1 day.  I don't eat eggs for two weeks.  I *like* to do this when the bird is molting/not laying if possible, but worm killing > egg eating.

If you do the "wazine pre-worming", then in 2 or more weeks later (no more than 2 months) I will do the following worming which I do to all birds twice a year - fall and spring.


I gather the birds being wormed into one area where they don't usually live.  Each bird gets picked up and thoroughly examined.  Skin, inside mouth, feathers, breathing, keel score, comb/wattles, vent, etc etc.  I doctor anything that needs doctoring.  Then I worm them (see below) and place them in the pen where they usually stay.  Then i get the next bird, rinse and repeat.  It helps to have a little portable folding table on which to work, a jacket or big men's shirt, and gloves.  Keep a bucket near by with scissors and meds in case you have to clean and treat any little things.


The wormers:

Ivermectin (pour-on, injectable given orally, or paste).  aka Ivomec though  I recommend generic, not "ivomec" brand because it's all "ivermectin".  Horse paste wormers for a 1200 lbs horse labeled as "ivermectin" will work.  I don't use the other -ectins, although I know some use eprinectin (eprinex).  Personally my preference is pour-on, generic.  Broad spectrum, kills more than just intestinal worms, kills adults AND larvae in many species, kills external parasites that take blood, and gapeworm.  High safety margin.  See dosage below.


Fenbendazole aka Safe-Guard. Panacur.  Paste.  Another good broad spectrum wormer with a high safety margin.  Kills roundworms (adults), cecal worms, capillary worms, and gape worms.  You can make a bb-sized piece of it and put into the beak.  MSU says that you can use as follows:

http://msucares.com/poultry/diseases/solutions.html



    1 oz Safeguard or Panacur per 15-20 lb feed


Dissolve the fenbendazole product in one cup of water. Mix this solution well into the feed and give to the birds as their only feed source for one day. When completely consumed, untreated feed can be given. Be sure that the commercial medication contains 10% fenbendazole.



Levamisole:  Kills capillary worms, cecal worms, roundworms (adults).

Dosage at: http://msucares.com/poultry/diseases/solutions.html




IVERMECTIN:


Personally, I use pour-on ivermectin for cattle.  It's a blue solution.  250ml generic costs about $14 and will last you ages!  It's best to have a helper, but can be done on your own with a table.  You will want to fill a syringe with a needle with a little ivomec.  I use a 3cc syringe and 25g needle.  You will NOT inject it - I use the needle to make one drop at a time of a uniform sized drop.  (I'm not able to do that with a regular dropper while holding a chicken.)  I hold the syringe pointing towards its side, not down at the bird, in case she jumps so I don't poke her. 


I find a spot on the bird, about 1/2" wide, that has no feathering and no down.  The best area is low on the back of the neck, or between the shoulders.  Once I find that spot, I dispense 1 to 8 drops on the skin.  If you get it on the down, it absorbs and you don't know whether or not the bird will get it - so make sure it's on the skin.


The dosage is as follows:


1 drop for a small or OEGB sized bantam.

2 drops for a large OEGB, small but not "micro" bantam.

3 drops for a regular bantam hen.

4 drops for an average hen or smaller large fowl rooster.

5 drops for the average large fowl

6 drops for a larger large fowl

7 drops for giant breed


Here's a post on ivermectin that explains using injectable, etc:
http://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/viewtopic.php?id=185989

Hey y'all. Know this is an old post but it has some great information! I'm on the ivermectin step of the worming process today, we did see roundworms about 2 weeks ago so we treated with Wazine. Was just going to do a second dose of Wazine but after reading this I bought ivermectin and I think I'd rather treat with that. So really I just want to ask whoever knows a little more on the dosing specifics. Can they be overdosed on ivermectin?
I have 12 hens that were treated with Wazine.
2 australorps (approx 7 lbs)
5 sex links & 1 buff Orpington (approx 5-6 lbs)
1 ~7 month old Cochin (maybe 3-4 lbs)
1 18 week old faverolle (~3-4 lbs)
1 18 week old Cochin (~3 lbs)
1 tiny broody new hamshire red hen (she's definitely smaller than all the other but don't know her weight)
Just worried about overdosing the little ones. Or not giving enough to the adults.
Any experts on chicken sizes? I don't know what is considered a bantam or an average large fowl.
Thanks!!
Proud mama of the Game of Thrones chickens!
Danaerys (Dany), Arya, Cersei, Melisandre (Meli) (RIP), Sansa, Myrcella, Lady Olena, Margaery, Lyanna, Lady, Shae, Ygritte, Gilly, Catelyn (RIP) and Arryn. Currently residing in Hen's Landing and Casterly Coop!
& our newest chicks Jenna, Becky, Shady and Rochelle.
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Proud mama of the Game of Thrones chickens!
Danaerys (Dany), Arya, Cersei, Melisandre (Meli) (RIP), Sansa, Myrcella, Lady Olena, Margaery, Lyanna, Lady, Shae, Ygritte, Gilly, Catelyn (RIP) and Arryn. Currently residing in Hen's Landing and Casterly Coop!
& our newest chicks Jenna, Becky, Shady and Rochelle.
Reply
post #125 of 127
I know this is an old thread, but I suspect it is visited a lot (this is my first post ever, so bear with me please, if this has already been brought up). The question of Wazine and how long to wait to eat eggs got me thinking...what do they give people with worms? Piperazine! Here is a link from Mayo clinic with some dosage info: http://www.mayoclinic.org/drugs-supplements/piperazine-oral-route/proper-use/DRG-20065522 I am a lot less concerned about eating eggs 2 or 3 weeks after Wazine treatment, since it is also used on humans. Not that I plan to have a Wazine cocktail anytime soon smile.png
post #126 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by glhallas View Post

I know this is an old thread, but I suspect it is visited a lot (this is my first post ever, so bear with me please, if this has already been brought up). The question of Wazine and how long to wait to eat eggs got me thinking...what do they give people with worms? Piperazine! Here is a link from Mayo clinic with some dosage info: http://www.mayoclinic.org/drugs-supplements/piperazine-oral-route/proper-use/DRG-20065522 I am a lot less concerned about eating eggs 2 or 3 weeks after Wazine treatment, since it is also used on humans. Not that I plan to have a Wazine cocktail anytime soon smile.png

Welcome to BYC and thanks for the link!

 

-Kathy

post #127 of 127

Piperazine

There is one study looking at piperazine residues in the eggs of treated hens. Piperazine is approved for use in laying hens in Australia and Canada at doses ranging from 130 to 200mg/kg/body weight one time and a zero day egg and meat withdrawal. In the US, since there is no tolerance, this withdrawal needs to be extended.

 

Source:http://www.usfarad.org/drug-wdi-faqs.html

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