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How to reform a flogging rooster - Page 2

post #11 of 17

At 20 weeks of age a cockerel's testosterone level is starting to climb rapidly.  He is beginning to measure the extent of, and to look for ways to expand, his dominance while exercising his prerogatives.  He doesn't know `antagonizing' from antinomy (he just lives it).  Your son(s) are seen as threats to the safety/control of the flock, or as wayward members of the flock that need to be kicked into line.  There are no peace offerings (food/treat source).  He will just as likely drop the treat, give out with the `tidbitting' call to the girls and then jump to flog the owner of the hand that just passed him the goody. One of the signs that a cockerel/roo is trying to control you is his standing nearby and engaging in sham `tidbitting', i.e., picking up dead grass/gravel/etc. and tossing it to one side or the other with his beak (not making the tidbitting call, just closing the gap until WHAM).  Almost as if he's saying `yo ma hen, now get in the car, hen' (at this point ours finds himself riding on my forearm like so much pigskin, laced, and knotted up, by the humiliation of it all).

A rattlesnake is more predictable than a roo.  Rattlers usually strike if one wanders into their `space', they do not pretend to ignore you then circle around and sneak up from behind to `lay on the fangs'.  Roos will `seem' to be foraging around in the run, as you bend over to change out the water, so as to get a better shot at your face.  They will  appear to be innocently involved in ranging with the hens. as you walk past (hands empty), on the way get some straw and wood chips for the coop, timing the subsequent bushwhacking of the backs of your legs to the moment  your hands are full `can't grab me this time, human!' WHAM!

Our roo is an average example.  New, or unusual stimuli can set him off (new pair of mudboots with a yellow layer of rubbber above the sole he just had to attack - took about a week before he adjusted), he is wary and watchful of us most of the time and takes good care of his hens.  He is not fond of being picked up and carried around every time he decides to test our dominance.  Standard roos are easy to grab when they saunter up, put their head down signalng the challenge by `unfurling' the hackles: 

Bend over, knees locked and hands down just like a toe touching exercise, quickly place one hand on the roo's back and the other on a wing, slide the hand on back down on the opposite wing, grab him up, flip him around lengthwise and, if done properly, he will then be tucked up under one arm like a football.  Take the hand that's free and move it toward the roo's face like a traffic cop giving the Stop signal - roos can't get a good grip  on a flat palm with their beak.  Massage his wattles and tell him what a good guy he is (ours hates that).  I might have to cycle through this pattern three times before he realizes his hens have moved off into the garden; he'll stand there shifting from one foot to the other, working the odds, before giving out with his growly whine and off he goes.  This is usually all it takes and he pretty much ignores or tolerates us for several weeks before trying to advance to alpha again.

The only SURE way to avoid unpredictable injuries and difficult to answer questions in the ER:
http://i30.photobucket.com/albums/c331/IvanIvanovich/Visiting0608.jpg

When to pick up, or, if not so inclined, apply the BROOM, or the breading...  - I'd go with demonstrating to him, again, the `joys' of perfect submission roll :
http://i30.photobucket.com/albums/c331/IvanIvanovich/HackledOffA092707.jpg

On reaching an `understanding' our roo takes it easy and lets the _____ mammal sitting on the deck steps do predator duty:
http://i30.photobucket.com/albums/c331/IvanIvanovich/RecumbentRoo071609.jpg

A how-to guide on avoiding  a`spurious' peckng order:  http://shilala.homestead.com/roosters.html

ED
:  Get a pair of mudboots and wear them ONLY in the backyard (good to prevent spur bruises from standard roos - Bantam Roos? not so much, as someone mentioned one flying up into their face while they were on a ladder! - also the separate footwear/`shin guard' is good biosecurity measure)

ed: clarity/`gwamma'


Edited by ivan3 - 7/19/09 at 9:26pm
post #12 of 17

This will most likely be too "old school" for most of yall but a swift kick works well!
My wife had rooster problems....every time she stepped outside he went after her....one quick lesson on whos the boss and all is well. Trust me, it wont kill him!cool

post #13 of 17

It's best to keep children away from roosters because he is just doing his duty.  You don't see your sons' actions as threatening but your cock does.   Many cocks are tolerant, but most aren't.  Keeping them seperate stops these things from happening.

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post #14 of 17

We had a very agressive rooster a Blue Laced Wynd. named Martha that attacked out son then 6 when ever he was outside.  Martha only attacked smaller children no adults although he tried me once and only once.  Well we put Martha in the stew pot (Beautiful bird hard to do) and our other rooster a yellow japanese bantam started to do the same thing but on a much milder scale.  Both roosters only picked on smaller children.  Our son never chased the birds so I think it is a dominance thing.  Now our son just goes into the coop wiith a short stick to fend off Princess (none of the above names were picked by me).  We do not let small children into the coop or run alone just in case Princess sizes them up and decides he is bigger.  Good Luck.  We tried the holding thing and it didn't work but maybe we gave up early.  I did hold princess down with my foot for a good five minutes with his head pressed into the ground after he attacked me one time and he never tried again.

Barred Rocks, White Rock, Cochins, Yellow Japanes bantam, Australorp, Black bantam, Ameraucanas, Cornish X (pullet), Buff Orpington, RR  Silver Laced Wyandottes, Gold Laced Wyandottes, Mille Fleur d'Uccles.  Diversified and Lovely.
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Barred Rocks, White Rock, Cochins, Yellow Japanes bantam, Australorp, Black bantam, Ameraucanas, Cornish X (pullet), Buff Orpington, RR  Silver Laced Wyandottes, Gold Laced Wyandottes, Mille Fleur d'Uccles.  Diversified and Lovely.
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post #15 of 17

I wouldn't leave any child that age unsupervised with any rooster for the very simple reason that a rooster is just the right height to spur a child in the eyes. It only takes one time to do permanent damage. I mean you are standing right beside the child and can intervene immediately. And children's jerky movements tend to make roosters nervous.  Best to wait till the child is older and can be taught how to actually handle and subdue a rooster and keep them separated by fencing, as John suggested by his picture he posted above.
Quite simply, most roosters cannot be reformed. Flogging roosters don't get to stay here, period.

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Come See the ALL NEW Blue Roo Creations, where every artisan is a veteran or the spouse of a veteran!

BRC Web Store Purchases Now Include Shipping!

It Has Come to My Attention that Empathy for Others in Today's World Has Died...URGENT! Always Quarantine Newly Purchased Birds!
~A dog on its owner's property is a pet; A dog on someone else's property is a predator~

 
 

 

 

 

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post #16 of 17

We had to rehome our EE rooster because he started flogging my 2 year old.  She would be holding the hens (they are pets and tame!) and the rooster would get upset and fly up with his feet and gauge her back.  He left a lot of bloody bruises. sad  We gave him to the mailman one day, lol.  He has older kids and so far he says the rooster hasn't bothered them. 

The rooster we have now, we raised from a chick and we've been sure to hold him a lot.  He's just now about 15 weeks old and getting hormonal, but he hasn't seemed like he's going to be a flogging boy so far.  I try to hold him every day for a few minutes.  He did have a pecking problem recently--he would bite toes or fingers HARD and twist the skin and not let go.  My feet were covered in blood blisters and scabs!  One swift knee jerk kick when he was latched onto my foot with his beak and he hasn't done it since.  There's a lot to be said for a good kick!  Not that anyone should physically abuse their animals, but when you need to be dominant a quick kick to an attacking roo really gets the point across.  I tell my toddler now if a rooster starts to bother her to kick it--she always wears rubber boots outside....

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post #17 of 17

Yep what speckledhen says. I would never allow a small child to be around a rooster. It only takes a moment, and that child is scarred forever. If you want to keep that rooster, keep him in a pen that can be locked, to keep the kids out. And be aware that he will probably become more aggressive as he matures.

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