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Has anyone ever used KePeg Egg Preserver? - Page 2

post #11 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by RogerA View Post
 

I have been using kepeg since I was 13 years old and am almost seventy now. This stuff has never failed me yet.. Prior to coating,  your eggs should be dry, unwashed and at least one day old but no longer than one week, and store them in a reasonably cool place...Regards..Roger

 

:welcome

 

Nice to have the voice of experience! I've not heard of it, myself, but would be willing to look into it. How long have you had eggs stay reasonably fresh? Any decline in taste or overall quality? Do they still fry up nicely?

Rachel BB

Stem cell transplant from unrelated donor in Feb 2015. Thank you to all my friends here on BYC for all your support during my treatment and ongoing recovery!

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Rachel BB

Stem cell transplant from unrelated donor in Feb 2015. Thank you to all my friends here on BYC for all your support during my treatment and ongoing recovery!

Reply
post #12 of 16

KePeg will keep your fresh eggs fresh for a year without refrigeration. KePeg is a completely natural product that was developed in New Zealand during the Great Depression in the 30's by a local chemist by the name of G. J. Penny (no relation to J.C.). You simply apply a solid coat over the egg shell which seals the pores and keeps the oxygen from penetrating the shell. You can then store them in a cool, dark and dry place for up to one year. KePeg has been tested in a research laboratory in Queensland, Australia with the results being that KePeg kept the eggs fresh for over 12 months - the test continues and the record has been three years. With the help of an Australian manufacturing company, KePeg is being packaged under strict hygienic conditions. KePeg comes in a 40 gram jar (about 1.5 oz.).

post #13 of 16

Wonders what this stuff really is and if the manufacturer has a website where the ingredients are listed?

Quick google search didn't turn much up.

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

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Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #14 of 16

I have been using Ke-Peg for a few months now (after checking  with a few grannys I know) . I consulted with  a few ladies I know who had reason to use this product years ago in the 30's and they all said that it should work. Much to my surprise it does work and none of my egg customers have had any bad experiences either. I sell my eggs as 100 % organic and wanted to make sure that this product would pass muster.  It works wonderfully and I have had no issues baking with the eggs. 

post #15 of 16

Sorry to dig up this old thread.  I'm wondering if I should get some of this for winter when I get zero eggs. What happens to the shell after coating?  Is this stuff visible on the shell after it dries? Does the egg crack differently when you do go to use if for breakfast or baking? Can it be used with the same results on duck and quail eggs?

 

I'd love to see any photos of it in use and on the eggs!


Edited by Sill - 3/9/16 at 8:41am
post #16 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sill View Post
 

Sorry to dig up this old thread.  I'm wondering if I should get some of this for winter when I get zero eggs. What happens to the shell after coating?  Is this stuff visible on the shell after it dries? Does the egg crack differently when you do go to use if for breakfast or baking? Can it be used with the same results on duck and quail eggs?

 

I'd love to see any photos of it in use and on the eggs!


Digging this up a year later!!! lol

 

Sill, did you try it?  Have any success with egg storage this winter season?

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