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Wild Ginseng found...Pa - Page 3

post #21 of 33

Time to take a walk out through the woods................

post #22 of 33
Thread Starter 

If you could train your dog to sniff it out be much easier finding it

it doesnt grow to many places here on blue mountains/Appalachia..

Took me a few years to be able to find it, lots of studying of the plant by pictures helped and also were it likes to grow and with what other plants that it grows with can make it much easier finding here.

Have never harvested any yet, but I'm thinking about getting a few plants and try to grow it here in a box if i can find more info on how to do it, would like to harvest seeds from those plants and plant all over in the mountains..but also to look at the plants right in the backyard would be neat..


Edited by wilds of pa - 8/28/09 at 10:23am
Government is not reason, it is not eloquence, it is force; like fire, a troublesome servant and a fearful master. Never for a moment should it be left to irresponsible action." - George Washington
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Government is not reason, it is not eloquence, it is force; like fire, a troublesome servant and a fearful master. Never for a moment should it be left to irresponsible action." - George Washington
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post #23 of 33

you can actually purchase potted ginseng plants!  A lot of 'specialty' (herbal) nurseries will sell them...especially "native' plants like American Ginseng.  I bought a plant last year or the year before and have planted it on the north side of my yard (heavily shaded of course) and it's doing really well there.  Of course you don't harvest it for a year or two...but i'm not planning on harvesting the ginseng.
I have lots of different 'valuable' herbal plants growing in my yard  that no one even recognizes!  (My secret little medicine cabinet if you will!)  Heck...I got some "we checked your lawn and you have plantain, red clover, dandelions, etc....and we could treat your lawn with chemicals to get rid of these horrors" pamphlets!  I laughed....the plantain treats burns and bee stings, the red clover can be used for wine, salves etc and the dandelions (if kept in check) can be eaten or their roots roasted like coffee!  Don't sound like horrors to me! 
It's a good sign everyone has found the ginseng in their areas.  I think a lot of 'wildcrafting' can have negative impacts if not kept in check.  (hence my growing of these plants in my tiny yard).  IF you wanted to grow these plants, I would suggest doing it in the ground vice containers as the tubers are what you're after....in containers, they will require much more attention like watering etc.  IF you can plant them in the ground, that would be ideal.  Good luck!

post #24 of 33
Thread Starter 

cool on the potted ginseng plant, what size pot was it planted in and how big of a plant may have it been?

if i try potting some i don't want the root only the seed the plant produces to replant else were, plus to have the plant for my own visual appeal..

You can also use the dandelion for wine as well..

Government is not reason, it is not eloquence, it is force; like fire, a troublesome servant and a fearful master. Never for a moment should it be left to irresponsible action." - George Washington
Reply
Government is not reason, it is not eloquence, it is force; like fire, a troublesome servant and a fearful master. Never for a moment should it be left to irresponsible action." - George Washington
Reply
post #25 of 33

I think I bought it as a 4" pot for like $3.  The plants also multiply by the roots as well!  (they spread by their roots/rhizomes as well as the seeds).  do an internet search for 'herb nurseries' and see who sells them.  Just make sure to compare prices with sizes as your mileage WILL vary!  I keep getting 'lucky' at our annual Mother's Day Master Gardeners sale.  Some arboretums also have plant sales around Columbus Day weekend as well.  "Local" plant sales/fairs are the best places to look!  (some farmers markets will also have people selling plants...mostly potted herbs....great place to make 'connections'!)
Good luck!

post #26 of 33

Somehow the really good ginseng buyers can tell 'wild' from 'planted'. The true wild sang can bring a pretty penny, and even the cultivated can bring a good price.

Old timers will harvest the old ginsing and just replant the berries right in the same place.

Cheri

2 grown daughters, and dear sweet enabling husband, retired Navy, and now dear FIL, retired Navy Captain. Oh yeah, chickens galore, 3 horses and a donkey.
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2 grown daughters, and dear sweet enabling husband, retired Navy, and now dear FIL, retired Navy Captain. Oh yeah, chickens galore, 3 horses and a donkey.
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post #27 of 33
Thread Starter 

Yes if planted in amended(tilled) soil the root will look like a carrot straight no personality to it and most look identical,, wild or wild grown ginseng can be of many shapes and sizes and no two are alike.

i think I'm going to try a root or two in a 8" pot and see how and if they will grow behind my house, gets about 75% shade back there, Pa ginseng season is open as of Aug 1st..

Government is not reason, it is not eloquence, it is force; like fire, a troublesome servant and a fearful master. Never for a moment should it be left to irresponsible action." - George Washington
Reply
Government is not reason, it is not eloquence, it is force; like fire, a troublesome servant and a fearful master. Never for a moment should it be left to irresponsible action." - George Washington
Reply
post #28 of 33

My Grandfather, who passed away many years ago, was an avid ginseng hunter. This was one of his favorite past times. He also took my older brothers out to find it and taught them about it. I was always too young to go. Before he passed away he planted a rather large ginseng patch near our home in the woods. It hasn't been touched in over 25 years. It is a beautiful plant, but it can be confused with other wild plants I have been told. The red berries is a dead giveaway though,...Just remember though, when you dig "seng" the roots has to be dried to sell it. It takes a pile of roots dried to make a pound. In my younger days I saw trashbags full of the roots, and didn't weigh but a few pounds. Good luck though,...it can be a lucretive hobby. thumbsup

post #29 of 33

Ginseng is a great herb! It's a muscle relaxant incase you guys hadn't known. Makes you feel tingly and mellow cool


Edited by Year of the Rooster - 8/28/09 at 9:31pm
post #30 of 33

for those who dont relize the important, i guess in the right market its worth a lot of money per pound,  anyone know mrket value?

weather will be weather,   weather ya like it , or not
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weather will be weather,   weather ya like it , or not
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