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Preferred Meat Rabbit Dispatch Method - Page 3

post #21 of 28

actually here is a cut and paste from a thread that was on BYC a couple months ago about the wringer. It also lists other ways to dispatch the rabbit.

Steve

Hello, everyone--glad to see a rabbit discussion, and I may be able to help answer some questions on humane killing.

Humane killing:
    Humane killing is called 'euthanasia' and means giving the animal a fast
and painless death, minimizing or eliminating all avoidable fear, stress,
and distress.
    In rabbits, this is done by disrupting brain function as quickly as
possible, usually by way of direct trauma to either the brain or brainstem,
which results in a stun OR a kill.  Immediate decapitation or at very least
complete bleed-out of the stunned/killed animal is imperative to both ensure
death and from a food safety standpoint.

    From a humane standpoint, ALWAYS ALWAYS ALWAYS have a back-up method.
Messing it up is traumatic and painful for all concerned, not to mention
embarassing.

    There are a zillion different methods, but here are some of the most
common techniques and their humane issues:
    Blunt trauma: The old 'hit 'em on the head'.  Works well to stun or
kill; immediate decapitation or throat-slitting to the spine is required to
ensure death while the rabbit is definitely unconscious.  May be more
difficult to remove the head due to the spine remaining intact.
    Gunshot: A shot with a .22 or larger (be reasonable here, and DON'T EVER
FORGET the safety factor!!!), directed from the base of the skull toward the
mouth or tip of the nose, is generally sufficient.  NEVER perform on
anything that can cause a ricochet, even with snakeshot/birdshot loads!
Deep, soft soil free of rocks is best; a bottomless small enclosure with a
little pile of treats keeps the bun content and still.
            Note: when I trialed the use of an 'average' (non-CO2) pellet
gun, I was very disappointed with the result, which was an injurious stun
rather than the kill I'd hoped for, so be aware--decapitate or bleed out
QUICK! once stunned.
    Cervical dislocation: Breaking the neck at the base of the skull is
probably one of the more difficult skills to master doing with one's bare
hands, but there are mechanical aids which can make this more certain and
easier on all concerned.  UNDER NO CIRCUMSTANCES should one use a method
which causes pain before the spine separates from the base of the
skull...that comes under 'avoidable pain' and is NOT a humane death.
        Manual cervical dislocation is a time-honored, humane skill which I
definitely recommend one have a tutor for!  The point of pressure and the
angle at which the skull is held relative to the spine is vital to the
success of the method (that, and remembering to NEVER close one's hand
around the jaw...).  Those with limited strength or short arms may need help
adjusting the technique for success.
        'Broomsticking', done properly, is quite humane.  Use a narrow,
STRONG rod and your sense of balance to lay the rod across, stepping lightly
but firmly on one end.  Use your other foot (tip on the heel to bring the
toe and rod to the ground when ready) to pin the rabbit's head to the ground
and pull UP on the hindlegs at the same instant.  If your timing is off,
this is not a humane method.
        All of these methods of cervical dislocation may be humanely
performed/practiced on a rabbit which has been stunned by the blunt trauma
method, by the way--as long as the skull is intact and you work quickly.

I hope this is helpful information, and invite you to the Meatrabbits group
on YahooGroups if you have further questions, or you can email me directly
at RIC@cncnet.com .  There's a TON of information on butchering in the
Meatrabbits archives.

Thank you for your time.

Pamela Alley, RVT
Director, Rabbit Industry Council
ListSis, Meatrabbits

post #22 of 28

I researched this thoroughly before I started raising rabbits.  The method I came up with is---grab rabbit by back legs. then grab rabbit by the neck and pull outwards.  I found that it requires more  upper body strength than what I have.  There was no way I could have done more than the one successfully.  I now have my son help me-  he grabs by the legs, I grab by the neck.  It is quick, painless (as in they did not cry like they can if you do not dispatch quickly), effective.  this is the method I have been using for over a year.  Clubbing seemed to me to be iffy--what if the rabbit moved, what if my aim was off?, what if I didn't strike hard enough?  the method I use is fail proof.

chickens, ducks,, seasonal cornish X, horses,  sheep, a milk cow, asnd a milk goat, dogs,  cats, and eggs in the 'bator.. And the greatest family in the world!
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chickens, ducks,, seasonal cornish X, horses,  sheep, a milk cow, asnd a milk goat, dogs,  cats, and eggs in the 'bator.. And the greatest family in the world!
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post #23 of 28

Spam removed by Staff.


11. No advertising or marketing of your products or services outside of the BackYardChickens Buy / Sell section. Even posts in these areas should be in moderation.

post #24 of 28

Having milked 80 goats for 30+ years I have very strong hands. I place the rabbit on a stand with the rabbit facing my right, place the left hand on the shoulders with index finger and thumb around the base if neck, grasp head with right hand around the neck behind the ears and with a very fast hard pull the head comes off. Not even a 1/10 of a second. I learned this form one of my school teachers that raised rabbits for meat also.

My dad used to have a very sharp pointed knife and would cut the artery and/or vein in the neck at the base of the scull where it attaches to the neck. Never seen them struggle or utter a sound. I could never get the cut right it seemed.

post #25 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rabbit Wringer 

Be courteous to members at all times--namecalling is not courteous.

Edited by staff

Sal


There is no need to be rude.  I'll save the $40 and not support someone, who doesn't act in a civil manner.

post #26 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Safado 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rabbit Wringer 

Edited content deleted by staff...

Sal


There is no need to be rude.  I'll save the $40 and not support someone, who doesn't act in a civil manner.


No kidding...what better way to promote your product than to call your customers idiots!  besides, at 0.03c per round, i'd be able to "dispatch" more than 1300 rabbits for the same price!

Hey Seramas....you can really pull their heads right off?  Are you pulling apart, or pushing down on both sides of the stand you mentioned?

there's always a whirlwind of thoughts and ideas in my head.  if i drink enough it'll slow down enough for me to grab one or two, but then i forget by the next morning....
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there's always a whirlwind of thoughts and ideas in my head.  if i drink enough it'll slow down enough for me to grab one or two, but then i forget by the next morning....
Reply
post #27 of 28

I'll have to give Pam a heads up so she can defend herself. I've been following her list for quite some time and have found her to be anything but an "idiot".  I don't agree with everything she has to say, mainly due to a differing approach to agriculture, but she is a very bright woman.

I will also trust her unbiased evaluation of a product over that of the products creator.

"There are too many books in the world to read in a single lifetime; you have to draw the line somewhere." --Diane Setterfield, The Thirteenth Tale

 

What I'm reading now:  Aquaponic Gardening, by Sylvia Bernstein.

Reply

"There are too many books in the world to read in a single lifetime; you have to draw the line somewhere." --Diane Setterfield, The Thirteenth Tale

 

What I'm reading now:  Aquaponic Gardening, by Sylvia Bernstein.

Reply
post #28 of 28

WOW!

don't check a thread for a few days and I miss all kinds of fun.

I wouldn't spend $40 on a wabbit winger, neither. that fella don't sound to nice, he don't get none of my money.

Fisherman and Chicken Magnate--- Extra-ordinair
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Fisherman and Chicken Magnate--- Extra-ordinair
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